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A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
Johntaraz
A Hunger Artist
User ID: 66408
12-14-2011 07:13 AM

Posts: 7,216



Post: #31
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
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Full Circle  Wrote: (12-13-2011 07:31 AM)
I have a beautiful painting that was given to me by a woman that lived on the block that I worked and serviced. To me, it captures peace, and praise. And gratitude.

How can we NOT be grateful for what we have? Each day is a blessing of Life.
Maybe you could post a picture of it some time.
I enjoy art as well. Creating and appreciating what others have created.

Gratefulness and thankfulness are part of the breath of life.
Giving (thoughtfulness, fulfilling need) is the exhale, recieving and being grateful for the gift (thankful, satisfaction) is the inhale. The giver and receiver are rewarded.
A sacred cycle.--(Money and purchasing are without this).

Too bad they are not as common and natural as breathing.


...........Nice to hear from you Full Circle.

"The unexamined life is not worth living."--Socrates"
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
— Søren Kierkegaard
The Conspiracy Library
Quote this message in a reply
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Johntaraz
A Hunger Artist
User ID: 70327
12-30-2011 09:42 AM

Posts: 7,216



Post: #32
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka

"The unexamined life is not worth living."--Socrates"
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
— Søren Kierkegaard
The Conspiracy Library
Quote this message in a reply
Johntaraz
A Hunger Artist
User ID: 74665
01-25-2012 10:03 AM

Posts: 7,216



Post: #33
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
A Project Gutenberg of Australia eBookTitle: The Prophet
Author: Kahlil Gibran

ON LOVE
THEN said Almitra, Speak to us of Love.
And he raised his head and looked upon the people, and there fell a stillness upon them. And with a great voice he said:
When love beckons to you, follow him,
Though his ways are hard and steep.
And when his wings enfold you yield to him,
Though the sword hidden among his pinions may wound you.
And when he speaks to you believe in him,
Though his voice may shatter your dreams as the north windlays waste the garden.
FOR even as love crowns you so shall he crucify you.
Even as he is for your growth so is he for your pruning.
Even as he ascends to your height and caresses your tenderest branches
that quiver in the sun,
So shall he descend to your roots and shake them in their clinging to the earth.
LIKE sheaves of corn he gathers you unto himself.
He threshes you to make you naked.
He sifts you to free you from your husks.
He grinds you to whiteness.
He kneads you until you are pliant;
And then he assigns you to his sacred fire, that you may become sacred bread for God's sacred feast.
ALL these things shall love do unto you that you may know the secrets of your heart, and in that knowledge become a fragment of Life's heart.
BUT if in your fear you would seek only love's peace and love's pleasure,
Then it is better for you that you cover your nakedness and pass out of love's threshing-floor,
Into the seasonless world where you shall laugh, but not all of your laughter, and weep, but not all of your tears.
LOVE gives naught but itself and takes naught but from itself.
Love possesses not nor would it be possessed;
For love is sufficient unto love.
WHEN you love you should not say, "God is in my heart," but rather,"I am in the heart of God."
And think not you can direct the course of love, for love, if it finds you worthy, directs your course.
LOVE has no other desire but to fulfill itself.
But if you love and must needs have desires, let these be your desires:
To melt and be like a running brook that sings its melody to the night.
To know the pain of too much tenderness.
To be wounded by your own understanding of love;
And to bleed willingly and joyfully.
To wake at dawn with a winged heart and give thanks for another day of loving;
To rest at the noon hour and meditate love's ecstasy;
To return home at eventide with gratitude;
And then to sleep with a prayer for the beloved in your heart and a song of praise upon your lips.

http://www.scribd.com/greatsage/d/268142...he-Prophet



[Image: 194E_4F1FB6AE.gif]

"The unexamined life is not worth living."--Socrates"
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
— Søren Kierkegaard
The Conspiracy Library
Quote this message in a reply
Johntaraz
A Hunger Artist
User ID: 83881
03-16-2012 08:14 AM

Posts: 7,216



Post: #34
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
What do I sense, what do I see in this world around me.
I see nothing that is not already inside of me.
I see a little boy flying a kite that got wrapped around the wires.
He fell and cut his wrist on a broken wine bottle discarded by his parents.
Over the sea he flew on a broken kite to foreign shores and wars.
With dogs in the street and promises broken to maidens in the night.
A homeland wanting saftey and security but earning neither.
A triumphal entry into Salem with fir branches lying along the streets from the clearcuts.
Try again my little leaf to fly your kite so high, fly it far from hungry eyes on hollow hills west of Eden.

What recipe will invoke a requiem for lost dreams
Which funeral barge sets sail upstream
Indigo skies encroach on heavy treads
Windigo children search the banks
for memories of their dead

Go now my son into the heart of the world
Tarry not astride the door for want of cloak already worn
Hungry eyes seeking your saftey whose tragic lots are cast
Upon the banks of darkened groves without another glance
Cast aside shrouds of winnowed wires
Broken hearts and scattered rivulets of pigment

In the valley of bedlam and lore they rose against a distant shore
Mocking cries of ravens searching for mates on fir boughs
Amidst those claws did pass robes from distance past
Borne by mystery dark and fierce light they rose, alighted
Glowing with the embers witnessed within a hunger tragic
Cast them down, cast them down jagged bones on mortar
Lift them up, lift them up banners crowned triumphant

Into a quiet night you see
Visions of eternity
Languish stride adrift no more
Sailing straight to distant shore

I leave now with a parting thought
One that might endure
To those that think the price is free
I wouldn't be so sure

"The unexamined life is not worth living."--Socrates"
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
— Søren Kierkegaard
The Conspiracy Library
Quote this message in a reply
Oh Bother :P
Registered User
User ID: 82995
03-16-2012 09:04 AM

Posts: 7,202



Post: #35
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
You have a beautiful thread here that I'll come back to more that once.

Heartflowers

"When you reach the heart of life you shall find beauty in all things, even in the eyes that are blind to beauty." ~ Kahlil Gibran

"No object is so beautiful that, under certain conditions, it will not look ugly." ~ Oscar Wilde


flowerysmile

I have been and still am a seeker, but I have ceased to question stars and books. I have begun to listen to the teachings my blood whispers to me: Hermann Hesse

If there be magic, let it be an art.
:Small bend from William Shakespeare


“How lucky I am to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard.”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh
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overfed and farting
lop guest
User ID: 79388
03-16-2012 10:06 AM

 



Post: #36
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
"Way to follow a GrowthMarket !" ...Congrats Franz.

......and as Franz would say: "The Trend is your friend."
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Johntaraz
A Hunger Artist
User ID: 89240
04-09-2012 08:58 AM

Posts: 7,216



Post: #37
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
A compilation of different war crimes committed by the United States, United Nations, and NATO.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3gRmgTAO2xY

__________________________

Parts from this document - the entire document can be read at the link at bottom.

Note this is only concerning the first Gulf War 1990 - 1991.

Begin quote:
--------------

International War Crimes Tribunal
United States War Crimes Against Iraq
Initial Complaint

The Charges

1. The United States engaged in a pattern of conduct beginning in or before 1989 intended to lead Iraq into provocations justifying U.S. military action against Iraq and permanent U.S. military domination of the Gulf.

2. President Bush from August 2, 1990, intended and acted to prevent any interference with his plan to destroy Iraq economically and militarily.

3. President Bush ordered the destruction of facilities essential to civilian life and economic productivity throughout Iraq.

The United States reports it flew 110,000 air sorties against Iraq, dropping 88,000 tons of bombs, nearly seven times the equivalent of the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima. 93% of the bombs were free falling bombs, most dropped from higher than 30,000 feet. Of the remaining 7% of the bombs with electronically guided systems, more than 25% missed their targets, nearly all caused damage primarily beyond any identifiable target. Most of the targets were civilian facilities.

Among the facilities targeted and destroyed were:

electric power generation, relay and transmission;
water treatment, pumping and distribution systems and reservoirs;
telephone and radio exchanges, relay stations, towers and transmission facilities;
food processing, storage and distribution facilities and markets, infant milk formula and beverage plants, animal vaccination facilities and irrigation sites;
railroad transportation facilities, bus depots, bridges, highway overpasses, highways, highway repair stations, trains, buses and other public transportation vehicles, commercial and private vehicles;
oil wells and pumps, pipelines, refineries, oil storage tanks, gasoline filling stations and fuel delivery tank cars and trucks, and kerosene storage tanks;
sewage treatment and disposal systems;
factories engaged in civilian production, e.g., textile and automobile assembly; and
historical markers and ancient sites.

4. The United States intentionally bombed and destroyed civilian life, commercial and business districts, schools, hospitals, mosques, churches, shelters, residential areas, historical sites, private vehicles and civilian government offices.

As a result of the bombing of facilities essential to civilian life, residential and other civilian buildings and areas, at least 125,000 men, women and children were killed. The Red Crescent Society of Jordan estimated 113,000 civilian dead, 60% children, the week before the end of the war.

The conduct violated the UN Charter, the Hague and Geneva Conventions, the Nuremberg Charter, and the laws of armed conflict.

5. The United States intentionally bombed indiscriminately throughout Iraq.

6. The United States intentionally bombed and destroyed Iraqi military personnel, used excessive force, killed soldiers seeking to surrender and in disorganized individual flight, often unarmed and far from any combat zones and randomly and wantonly killed Iraqi soldiers and destroyed materiel after the cease fire.

7. The United States used prohibited weapons capable of mass destruction and inflicting indiscriminate death and unnecessary suffering against both military and civilian targets.

Among the known illegal weapons and illegal uses of weapons employed by the United States are the following:

fuel air explosives capable of widespread incineration and death;
napalm;
cluster and anti-personnel fragmentation bombs; and
"superbombs," 2.5 ton devices, intended for assassination of government leaders.

Fuel air explosives were used against troops-in-place, civilian areas, oil fields and fleeing civilians and soldiers on two stretches of highway between Kuwait and Iraq. Included in fuel air weapons used was the BLU-82, a 15,000-pound device capable of incinerating everything within hundreds of yards.

One seven mile stretch called the "Highway of Death" was littered with hundreds of vehicles and thousands of dead. All were fleeing to Iraq for their lives. Thousands were civilians of all ages, including Kuwaitis, Iraqis, Palestinians, Jordanians and other nationalities. Another 60-mile stretch of road to the east was strewn with the remnants of tanks, armored cars, trucks, ambulances and thousands of bodies following an attack on convoys on the night of February 25, 1991. The press reported that no survivors are known or likely. One flatbed truck contained nine bodies, their hair and clothes were burned off, skin incinerated by heat so intense it melted the windshield onto the dashboard.

http://theuglytruth.wordpress.com/2011/0...-gulf-war/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WN6z5xr7EiI

8. The United States intentionally attacked installations in Iraq containing dangerous substances and forces.

Despite the fact that Iraq used no nuclear or chemical weapons and in the face of UN resolutions limiting the authorized means of removing Iraqi forces from Kuwait, the U.S. intentionally bombed alleged nuclear sites, chemical plants, dams and other dangerous forces.

9. President Bush ordered U.S. forces to invade Panama, resulting in the deaths of 1,000 to 4,000 Panamanians and the destruction of thousands of private dwellings, public buildings, and commercial structures.

10. President Bush obstructed justice and corrupted United Nations functions as a means of securing power to commit crimes against peace and war crimes.

11. President Bush usurped the Constitutional power of Congress as a means of securing power to commit crimes against peace, war crimes, and other high crimes.

12. The United States waged war on the environment.

Pollution from the detonation of 88,000 tons of bombs, innumerable missiles, rockets, artillery and small arms with the combustion and fires they caused and by 110,000 air sorties at a rate of nearly two per minute for six weeks has caused enormous injury to life and the ecology.

13. President Bush encouraged and aided Shiite Muslims and Kurds to rebel against the government of Iraq causing fratricidal violence, emigration, exposure, hunger and sickness and thousands of deaths. After the rebellion failed, the U.S. invaded and occupied parts of Iraq without authority in order to increase division and hostility within Iraq.

14. President Bush intentionally deprived the Iraqi people of essential medicines, potable water, food, and other necessities.

15. The United States continued its assault on Iraq after the cease fire, invading and occupying areas at will.

16. The United States has violated and condoned violations of human rights, civil liberties and the U.S. Bill of Rights in the United States, in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and elsewhere to achieve its purpose of military domination.

17. The United States, having destroyed Iraq's economic base, demands reparations which will permanently impoverish Iraq and threaten its people with famine and epidemic.

18. President Bush systematically manipulated, controlled, directed, misinformed and restricted press and media coverage to obtain constant support in the media for his military and political goals.

19. The United States has by force secured a permanent military presence in the Gulf, the control of its oil resources and geopolitical domination of the Arabian Peninsula and Gulf region.

Ramsey Clark
May 9, 1991
http://deoxy.org/wc/warcrim2.htm

end quote

"The unexamined life is not worth living."--Socrates"
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
— Søren Kierkegaard
The Conspiracy Library
Quote this message in a reply
Johntaraz
A Hunger Artist
User ID: 89240
04-10-2012 08:57 AM

Posts: 7,216



Post: #38
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
The typing will make it happen, because no other form of expression is available or suitable to convey anything at this point in time. So outside it is cool night I felt the darkness wrap around me rather soothing. For me there is less fear in the near darkness because everything is somehow closer. It seems strange but for me it is a reality.
I remember one of the first times I was unafraid of the dark was with a large German Shepard/Saint Bernard mix that loved to romp through the dark woods and logging roads with me. We would run like dogs of war through the darkness and somehow I knew with him everything was safe and that made it exhilarating.
Darkness has been said to embody our fears of the unknown, but as I age it seems that the only thing that is truly the cause of fear is oneself. If there is an appropriate action, non-action, reaction to anything in this world, which there may be, then it is our own reaction that may be wrong and perhaps unknowingly that is the source for fear.

"The unexamined life is not worth living."--Socrates"
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
— Søren Kierkegaard
The Conspiracy Library
Quote this message in a reply
Oh Bother :P
Registered User
User ID: 90281
04-17-2012 11:34 AM

Posts: 7,202



Post: #39
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
“A good poem helps to change the shape and significance of the universe,
helps to extend everyone's knowledge of himself and the world around him.”
Dylan Thomas

----------


History in Poetry: Nabinchandra Sen's Palashir Yuddha and the Question of Truth ROSINKA CHAUDHURI

In the process of writing about how modern Western history essentially began at the moment of differentiation between the present and the past, Michel de Certeau notes without disagreement that in India, "new forms never drive the older ones away" Already, right at the start of The Writing of History, Certeau establishes that in historiography, as in modern Western culture, "intelligibility is established through a relation with the other; it moves (or pro gresses') by changing what it makes of its other....

...........
When the nineteenth-century Bengali poet Nabinchandra Sen s stirring epic poem Palashir Yuddha (The Battle of Plassey) was finally released in the public sphere on April 15,1875, in Calcutta, a huge storm erupted in the literary world almost instantly.

After several well-known journals of the time brought out extensive reviews, Bengals most eminent man of letters, Bankimchandra Chatterjee, published a detailed discussion in his own periodical, Bangadarsan.
.........

By September of the same year, it was put up as a play by a group called the New Aryan Theatre, where the famous actor-director Girishchandra Ghosh is said to have first made a name for himself when he acted the part of Clive (Sen 1985, 359). The controversies and disputes that arose with the publication of this work were so great in number and so complicated in nature that they continued well into the turn of the century, returning time and again to haunt the author at every juncture.

But by far the most pointed charge among the many that Nabinchandra faced in his lifetime was made in 1897 by the historian Akshaykumar Maitreya, who, for the first time, raised the question, apropos of Palashir Yuddha, of the relationship of history to poetry and to truth. In his book Sirajuddaula, which had been appearing serially in the journals Sadhana and Bharati in 1895 and 1896, Maitreya devoted an entire section of the crucial chapter describing the actual battle at Palashi in 1757 (called the battle of Plassey by the British) to Nabinchandra Sen s work.

.............
He said there that he had written to the poet asking him why he had invented imaginary depravities for the character of the nawab Sirajuddaula in the poem and whether he had any historical information on the subject. In reply, an interlo cutor (the editor of Sahitya, Sureshchandra Samajpati) said on behalf of the poet, "Not a single line [was based on historical fact] (ek line o noi). Palashir Yuddha is poetry, not history?

That is what he has permitted me to write you." Maitreya continued, "Not everyone realises that Palashir Yuddha is not history! A lot of people will not easily have the courage to surmise that a patrio tic, erudite man of letters like him would have followed his poetic muse so far as to unnecessarily stain Siraj s character from head to toe with scandals created in his own imagination? many people accept his Palashir Yuddha as history!"

........
In a footnote, Maitreya quotes from the preface to this "history" book edition: "Not only has a complete poem like this a merit of its own superior to that of mere compilation of fugitive pieces but as it is also the history of Bengal of the period in verse, the introduction of such a book into our schools will be doubly beneficial to the students and an encouragement to real talent and for the literature of Bengal"

Maitreya takes exception to this, asserting, It may be that "the poet's path knows no impediments," but in his selec tion of historical portraiture he cannot in all places act without restraint. If the poet had stuck to "real history" (prakrita itihas) while writing about this unfortunate young king who was tricked, imprisoned, and then met with an untimely death, his composition would have touched our hearts much more. In fact, it would perhaps have been better had the poet taken refuge in his own imagination, then his imagination would not have been so much in the mould of Macaulay at ever step. Macaulay's Battle of Plassey is also poetry?


........
It is not history. If the poet had not clung to him with all the eagerness with which a blind man clutches his cane then the unfortunate Sirajuddaula's ghost could have been protected from the harsh hand of so many baseless attacks. That is the only reason that has compelled me to write an analysis of the calamitous mistakes made by one of our country's most celebrated poets. The phrase "the poets path knows no impediments," literally, "the poet's path has no thorns" (nishkantak),


........................

I have been and still am a seeker, but I have ceased to question stars and books. I have begun to listen to the teachings my blood whispers to me: Hermann Hesse

If there be magic, let it be an art.
:Small bend from William Shakespeare


“How lucky I am to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard.”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh
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Johntaraz
A Hunger Artist
User ID: 90040
04-22-2012 11:44 AM

Posts: 7,216



Post: #40
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
[Image: 45BE_4F93CB62.jpg]
De Chirico, Giorgio, 1888-1978.
The Soothsayer’s Recompense. 1913.
Oil on canvas. The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA.

sooth·say·er (sthsr)
n.
One who claims to be able to foretell events or predict the future; a seer.
Word History: The truth is not always soothing, but our verb soothe is related to soothsayer, the word for one who tells the truth, especially beforehand. The archaic adjective and noun sooth, "true, truth," comes from the Old English adjective and noun sth with the same meanings. The Old English form derives from Germanic *santh-az, "true," which comes from Indo-European *sont-, one of the participles from the Indo-European root -es-, "to be": the truth is that which is. Old English also formed a verb from sth, namely sthian, "to confirm to be true." This is the ancestor of soothe; its meaning changed from "to assent to be true, say 'yes' to" to "humor by assenting, placate." Doing the latter on occasion requires something less than the truth.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language

rec·om·pense (rkm-pns)
tr.v. rec·om·pensed, rec·om·pens·ing, rec·om·pens·es
1. To award compensation to: recompensed the victims of the accident.
2. To award compensation for; make a return for: recompensed their injuries.
n.
1. Amends made, as for damage or loss.
2. Payment in return for something, such as a service.
[Middle English recompensen, from Old French recompenser, from Late Latin recompnsre : Latin re-, re- + Latin compnsre, to compensate; see compensate.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language

The seer makes amends.

The prophet's retribution.

The bitter(sweet?) reward for seeing the future.

The metaphysical is an abstraction tool for excising truths from their empirical fortress built in the mind as part of the megalith.
The deserted plaza, Greek reclining figure, arches, distant train, clock, architectural symbols of the historical progress of humankind.
Two palm trees framed by an arch leaning away from each other, the only sign of life.
Described as melancholy.
I find plenty of meaning and content in the barren, alienating, descriptiveness and non-descriptiveness of this.
Form is emptiness, emptiness is form.
99 years later.

"The unexamined life is not worth living."--Socrates"
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
— Søren Kierkegaard
The Conspiracy Library
Quote this message in a reply
ManInTheMirror
There's a Storm coming
User ID: 52073
04-22-2012 12:28 PM

Posts: 1,291



Post: #41
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
Thanks for sharing,

Nice to read before bed time.

Heartflowers

You Can't handle My truth, so trust your own

http://themindtrap19.blogspot.com.au/201...-trap.html


Stop_war Hugs
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Johntaraz
A Hunger Artist
User ID: 90040
04-22-2012 12:53 PM

Posts: 7,216



Post: #42
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
ManInTheMirror  Wrote: (04-22-2012 12:28 PM)
Thanks for sharing,

Nice to read before bed time.

Heartflowers
Welcome always.Heartflowers

Visited the blog in your signature, very enlightened and nourishing.

Found this an important truth:

Quote:There is one thing that EVERY person CAN DO, to make the world a better place, if not perfect. What would it be?

The answer is helping. You were supposed to figure it out for yourselves, but at this rate, it could take forever. Helping is the only thing that causes us to evolve. If nothing helped, including all animals and plants, nothing would survive. Everything is here to do a job, and no matter how big or small, it is all helping with the great cycle of life. Everything living does this; plants, animals, even you, without being aware of it. We are all the caretakers of this world, if we all do not take care of it well, then it dies. That is no good to any of us. The best thing about humans is that we can become aware of what it is that we are doing.
http://themindtrap19.blogspot.com.au/201...world.html

"The unexamined life is not worth living."--Socrates"
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
— Søren Kierkegaard
The Conspiracy Library
Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 91899
04-22-2012 03:41 PM

 



Post: #43
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
Look at your body, a painted puppet,
A poor toy of jointed parts ready to collapse,
A diseased and suffering thing
With a head full of false imaginings.
(Dhammapada).
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ManInTheMirror
There's a Storm coming
User ID: 52073
04-23-2012 09:35 AM

Posts: 1,291



Post: #44
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
Johntaraz  Wrote: (04-22-2012 12:53 PM)
ManInTheMirror  Wrote: (04-22-2012 12:28 PM)
Thanks for sharing,

Nice to read before bed time.

Heartflowers
Welcome always.Heartflowers

Visited the blog in your signature, very enlightened and nourishing.

Found this an important truth:

Quote:There is one thing that EVERY person CAN DO, to make the world a better place, if not perfect. What would it be?

The answer is helping. You were supposed to figure it out for yourselves, but at this rate, it could take forever. Helping is the only thing that causes us to evolve. If nothing helped, including all animals and plants, nothing would survive. Everything is here to do a job, and no matter how big or small, it is all helping with the great cycle of life. Everything living does this; plants, animals, even you, without being aware of it. We are all the caretakers of this world, if we all do not take care of it well, then it dies. That is no good to any of us. The best thing about humans is that we can become aware of what it is that we are doing.
http://themindtrap19.blogspot.com.au/201...world.html

Why thank you :)

I notice you have put a lot more info here, so I have bookmarked to read after Heartflowers

You Can't handle My truth, so trust your own

http://themindtrap19.blogspot.com.au/201...-trap.html


Stop_war Hugs
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Motherduck
Kiwi Duck
User ID: 49375
04-23-2012 11:28 AM

Posts: 8,984



Post: #45
RE: A Hunger Artist -- Franz Kafka
It is ANZAC day on the 25th, to me it is a day to remember my grandfather and the friends he lost at war TissueHeartflowers

This is a traditional poem spoken at the ANZAC day speeches

"Ode of Remembrance."

"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them."

Fourth stanza of 'For the Fallen' by Laurence Binyon (1869 - 1943)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4tguISahMI


it is a day to cry and a day to celebrate

Love, live and laugh
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