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Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
friedrich
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User ID: 177678
10-10-2013 07:41 PM

Posts: 2,328



Post: #91
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
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Global warming Lmao
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 193901
10-10-2013 07:45 PM

 



Post: #92
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
v³Exceed  Wrote: (10-10-2013 05:10 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (10-10-2013 12:10 AM)
Snow is an insulator until it touches something warm and melts. Then snow becomes water, which freezes. Then snow becomes a refrigerator.

As a Canadian, I am intimately familiar with snow. Snow, usually falls when it's relatively warm. Not balmy warm but certainly not cold enough to freeze a cow.

A lot of times we will see the temperatures at -30 c and no snow at all for weeks at a time. Then as it warms up the snow starts to fall. To flash freeze tens of thousands of heads of cattle overnight it would have had to get -30-40 cold. Since cows "herd" they provide each other heat by proximity. So this increases the amount of cold required to actually freeze a cow to death.

I can't say what happened, but unless there are a ton of human fatalities as well, dogs, cats... etc.. something isn't right about this.

cows (and people) have frozen to death in Texas in my lifetime. up in the Panhandle. you had to factor in the wind chill and these were hurricane force winds and factor in that it was night and probably coming down so thick you would not be able to see anything. it used to be almost a yearly event that someone would get stuck on the road between in a blue northern between Panhandle and Borger and freeze to death. Usually some old couple. Sometimes, they weren't old.

Mom would always put some bags of sand in the trunk in the back, blankets, peanut butter, shovel, some boards or bricks for under the back tires to dig out, and water at the beginning of the bad winter weather. And, of course, we had chains for the tires if need be.

All through the 60s, we had doozies. We would get stuck in the house for a couple of weeks at a time. My dad got all turned around and lost in the backyard (big backyard) one time when a blizzard hit. He'd been gone so long, we were going to tie a rope to the back porch and around one of our waists and go try to feel around for him. You couldn't see anything. But, he grew up on a ranch and finally found the fence and followed it back. Had to crawl the wind was so fierce. He said he would crawl and pull himself a bit, then rest, then crawl and pull again.

After that, we tied a rope to the porch all the way out to the back fence every winter, so we could empty the trash without dying. We were in a small town. Imagine out in the country. Even colder and windier.
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v³Exceed
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User ID: 188208
10-10-2013 07:46 PM

Posts: 841



Post: #93
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
Gracie  Wrote: (10-10-2013 07:20 PM)
Hundreds of thousands of acres of rangeland where it rained several inches and the ground was already saturated "before" the huge, wet, "early" snowfall fell in the plains of western SD, one of the most sparsely populated areas of the state, and in the area of the state known for its significant beef production in the US. This, in a state that only has ~833,000 people - majority of them residing in the eastern portion of this HUGE ASS state. Seriously, what's not to understand? Just because you didn't read of power outages and damage to the homes in this rural area of the state, doesn't mean it didn't occur. The significant loss of livestock for that area was what most of the media outlets considered the "newsworthy" part of this catastrophic event.

Huge ass state?.. you have obviously never been to Canada. Nor are you familiar with what Canadian cold really is. Your American media would be all over Aunt Betsy's farm roof collapsing, yet not a single human life was lost.. you people are sheep of the worst kind.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 193901
10-10-2013 07:55 PM

 



Post: #94
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
v³Exceed  Wrote: (10-10-2013 06:52 PM)
Blue Waffle  Wrote: (10-10-2013 06:46 PM)
Maybe cows don't live in houses or have ready access to lifesaving technology (???)

Technology ...Like ...heat...ran by power... with huge storms comes power outages. FYI even a gas furnace needs power to run a fan or a furnace...

notice they have pretty much fixed it where you are not allowed to use those propane or gas heaters that don't have a fan. You just open the cock and light it and crack a window. everybody had those when i was growing up seems like up until the 1990s. where i live some people still do. they have to kind of keep quiet about it though. they are illegal now. they have to be built into the wall and have all kinds of ventilation, regs and this and that now. Can't have those gas heaters that have a copper hose anymore.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 187112
10-10-2013 08:04 PM

 



Post: #95
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
v³Exceed  Wrote: (10-10-2013 06:33 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (10-10-2013 05:47 PM)
I don't see what people can't grasp. Early season storm, cattle still had summer coats, several feet of heavy/wet snow, high winds.

I can stay outside all day at -20F with my winter gear, as long as it is dry. I will die of hypothermia in 40F while wearing the same gear if it is wet.

Not a conspiracy, just a big ass storm that hit before the cattle had grown their winter coats.

"Tens of Thousands" of cattle killed, but not one human.. At a time when NO ONE was prepared for this storm. I'm not suggesting that lots of human deaths would be a good thing, but it would be an expected thing.

Everyone who lives in the Northern Plains is more or less prepared. Coming from a northern climate, it is second nature. You watch the weather and plan accordingly.

It isn't rocket science.
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Gracie
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User ID: 194633
10-10-2013 08:10 PM

Posts: 5,108



Post: #96
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
v³Exceed  Wrote: (10-10-2013 07:46 PM)
Gracie  Wrote: (10-10-2013 07:20 PM)
Hundreds of thousands of acres of rangeland where it rained several inches and the ground was already saturated "before" the huge, wet, "early" snowfall fell in the plains of western SD, one of the most sparsely populated areas of the state, and in the area of the state known for its significant beef production in the US. This, in a state that only has ~833,000 people - majority of them residing in the eastern portion of this HUGE ASS state. Seriously, what's not to understand? Just because you didn't read of power outages and damage to the homes in this rural area of the state, doesn't mean it didn't occur. The significant loss of livestock for that area was what most of the media outlets considered the "newsworthy" part of this catastrophic event.

Huge ass state?.. you have obviously never been to Canada. Nor are you familiar with what Canadian cold really is. Your American media would be all over Aunt Betsy's farm roof collapsing, yet not a single human life was lost.. you people are sheep of the worst kind.

lol

Hey, everyone has to have their conspiracy woo woo niche, and if yours is no human deaths taking place where thousands of cattle were killed by an early snowstorm, knock your socks off!
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Blue Waffle
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User ID: 168898
10-10-2013 09:09 PM

Posts: 5,479



Post: #97
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
v³Exceed  Wrote: (10-10-2013 06:52 PM)
Blue Waffle  Wrote: (10-10-2013 06:46 PM)
Maybe cows don't live in houses or have ready access to lifesaving technology (???)

Technology ...Like ...heat...ran by power... with huge storms comes power outages. FYI even a gas furnace needs power to run a fan or a furnace...

Technology like an insulated house... Blankets... Warm clothing... Fire... (???)

Jhikpghf
http://www.scribd.com/doc/37203387/LSD25...-Pollution
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v³Exceed
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User ID: 188208
10-10-2013 09:15 PM

Posts: 841



Post: #98
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
Blue Waffle  Wrote: (10-10-2013 09:09 PM)
v³Exceed  Wrote: (10-10-2013 06:52 PM)
Technology ...Like ...heat...ran by power... with huge storms comes power outages. FYI even a gas furnace needs power to run a fan or a furnace...

Technology like an insulated house... Blankets... Warm clothing... Fire... (???)

So... you have never been snowed in anywhere then... got it.
I wish many would have the opportunity to enjoy a Canadian winter in the far north. One season and you would really understand how bad winter can get.
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Gracie
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User ID: 194633
10-10-2013 09:51 PM

Posts: 5,108



Post: #99
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
v³Exceed  Wrote: (10-10-2013 09:15 PM)
Blue Waffle  Wrote: (10-10-2013 09:09 PM)
Technology like an insulated house... Blankets... Warm clothing... Fire... (???)

So... you have never been snowed in anywhere then... got it.
I wish many would have the opportunity to enjoy a Canadian winter in the far north. One season and you would really understand how bad winter can get.

I grew up in the country in Wisconsin and we always had a wood burning stove in addition to electrical heat panels. Whenever we lost power, we still stayed warm enough and added layers of clothes. Some rural families didn't have electricity until the 30s, 40s - some even later than that. The Amish don't have electricity and manage the cold, northern winters just fine. When you live in the north, you plan your lifestyle accordingly.
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daersoulkeeper
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User ID: 116126
10-10-2013 10:21 PM

Posts: 4,513



Post: #100
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
LoP Guest  Wrote: (10-10-2013 12:35 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (10-10-2013 12:10 AM)
Snow is an insulator until it touches something warm and melts. Then snow becomes water, which freezes. Then snow becomes a refrigerator.

I'm not buyin' it.

hes right. if you fall into freezing water your suppose to use the snow to wipe off the water if you have no towel or dry clothes

or use as an igloo, just don't lay on it....
(This post was last modified: 10-10-2013 10:21 PM by daersoulkeeper.) Quote this message in a reply
dirtfarmer
Forum Farmer
User ID: 150597
10-18-2013 12:04 AM

Posts: 454



Post: #101
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
http://www.keloland.com/newsdetail.cfm/s...?id=154708

Quote:South Dakota's Secretary of Agriculture is estimating cattle losses from the blizzard in western South Dakota to be between 15,000 to 25,000 head.

Losses not as high as some estimates.

The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure
and the intelligent are full of doubt.
-- Bertrand Russell

The great masses of the people will more easily fall victims to a big lie than to a small one.
Adolf Hitler

If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.
Adolf Hitler
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Gracie
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User ID: 196050
10-18-2013 01:08 AM

Posts: 5,108



Post: #102
Blizzard in South Dakota leaves Tens of thousands of cattle dead
dirtfarmer  Wrote: (10-18-2013 12:04 AM)
http://www.keloland.com/newsdetail.cfm/s...?id=154708

Quote:South Dakota's Secretary of Agriculture is estimating cattle losses from the blizzard in western South Dakota to be between 15,000 to 25,000 head.

Losses not as high as some estimates.

Gosh, that's still a heck of a lot of dead cattle. Poor cows.

Does insurance usually cover most of the financial losses for the cattle ranchers in cases like this?
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