News
news The Unexplained Mystery Boom Phenomenon Continues Worldwide
news Scientists fear end to Mankind not 'decades away' but 'much sooner'
news Whitley Strieber reflects on his career
news 12-Year-Old Builds Fusion Reactor in His Family's Playroom
news Scientists build 'self-aware' robot able to repair itself
news Startup Plans to Send Pregnant Woman into Space to Give Birth
news Retailers sell out of macaroni and cheese with a 20-year shelf life
news Hunt for the Blackstar: On the Trail of the Military’s Secret 'Mothership'
news TV Series ‘Project Blue Book’ Is Based on a True UFO Story. Here It Is.
news The Mysterious Butterfly People of Missouri
news Drug to clear 'zombie cells' from body could be first anti-aging treatment


Username:
Password: or Register
 
Thread Rating:
  • 2 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
LopDude
⛔ Lop resident cat dude ⛔
User ID: 439014
03-14-2019 06:25 PM

Posts: 14,151



Post: #1
Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
Advertisement
Subaru Telescope spots 13-billion-year-old quasars powered by black holes

Source:
Princeton University
Summary:
Astronomers have discovered 83 quasars powered by supermassive black holes that were formed when the universe was only 5 percent of its current age


Astronomers from Japan, Taiwan and Princeton University have discovered 83 quasars powered by supermassive black holes in the distant universe, from a time when the universe was less than 10 percent of its present age.

"It is remarkable that such massive dense objects were able to form so soon after the Big Bang," said Michael Strauss, a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University who is one of the co-authors of the study. "Understanding how black holes can form in the early universe, and just how common they are, is a challenge for our cosmological models."

This finding increases the number of black holes known at that epoch considerably, and reveals, for the first time, how common they are early in the universe's history. In addition, it provides new insight into the effect of black holes on the physical state of gas in the early universe in its first billion years. The research appears in a series of five papers published in The Astrophysical Journal and the Publications of the Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...114728.htm

[Image: ftlol.gif]
[Image: candle.gif]
Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 429525
03-15-2019 01:07 AM

 



Post: #2
RE: Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
So after north of 10 billion years, wouldn't all them black holes have gobbled up the rest of the universe, or at least all the stuff near them?
Or evaporated?
I find their explanation to be a little myopic
Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 493156
03-15-2019 01:08 AM

 



Post: #3
RE: Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
Pathetic that these filth are still allowed to spew these delusions ...not a shred of evidence for this fairy tale
Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 465738
03-15-2019 01:13 AM

 



Post: #4
RE: Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
For us, the earth is the oldest point in the universe. For a black hole that ain't so.
Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 429525
03-15-2019 01:18 AM

 



Post: #5
RE: Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
LoP Guest  Wrote: (03-15-2019 01:08 AM)
Pathetic that these filth are still allowed to spew these delusions ...not a shred of evidence for this fairy tale

There's more evidence for this than for any religion you can name.
Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 429525
03-15-2019 01:18 AM

 



Post: #6
RE: Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
LoP Guest  Wrote: (03-15-2019 01:13 AM)
For us, the earth is the oldest point in the universe. For a black hole that ain't so.

Yes and its had more than 10 billion years to grow.
Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 465738
03-15-2019 01:22 AM

 



Post: #7
RE: Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
LoP Guest  Wrote: (03-15-2019 01:18 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (03-15-2019 01:13 AM)
For us, the earth is the oldest point in the universe. For a black hole that ain't so.

Yes and its had more than 10 billion years to grow.

Ten billion years for us is about two minutes for a black hole.
Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 429525
03-15-2019 02:07 AM

 



Post: #8
RE: Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
LoP Guest  Wrote: (03-15-2019 01:22 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (03-15-2019 01:18 AM)
Yes and its had more than 10 billion years to grow.

Ten billion years for us is about two minutes for a black hole.

Why? Cause its supposed to be moving so fast cause its so far away?
Dude that's space expanding,(or light getting tired if you go with that explanation) the object isn't moving that fast.
And besides, because of relativity we appear to be moving that fast to it. Net 0.
Quote this message in a reply
Natura Naturans
Registered User
User ID: 480998
03-15-2019 02:49 AM

Posts: 4,742



Post: #9
RE: Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
Quasars are mistakenly thought to be far distant because of the huge redshifts but they are very near stuff not so far away. Halton Arp wrote a book on his theory that the high redshifts were due to the quasar being ejected from the associated galaxy at high speed which if going away from us would explain the redshift. It means it is not farther away than the associated galaxy.

In 1967 Arp noted that several of these objects appeared on the list of quasars. In some photographs a quasar is in the foreground of known galaxies, and in others there appeared to be matter bridging the two objects, implying they are very close in space. If they are, and the redshifts were due to Hubble expansion, then both objects should have similar redshifts. The galaxies had much smaller redshifts than the quasars. Arp argued that the redshift was not due to Hubble expansion or physical movement of the objects, but must have a non-cosmological or "intrinsic" origin.

Arp also noted that quasars were not evenly spread over the sky, but tended to be more commonly found in positions of small angular separation from certain galaxies. This being the case, they might be in some way related to the galaxies. Arp's hypothesis is that quasars are local objects ejected from the core of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Nearby galaxies with both strong radio emission and peculiar morphologies, particularly M87 and Centaurus A, appeared to support Arp's hypothesis.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halton_Arp...suggestion

As far as black holes are concerned they can better be explained by large blue stars. They are found in the centers of very hot galaxies, not somewhere you would expect to find an energy sucker.

“The highest activity a human being can attain is learning for understanding, because to understand is to be free.” --Baruch Spinoza
Quote this message in a reply
GrimShaw
Raise the Black
User ID: 492485
03-15-2019 03:06 AM

Posts: 9,058



Post: #10
RE: Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe
LoP Guest  Wrote: (03-15-2019 01:22 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (03-15-2019 01:18 AM)
Yes and its had more than 10 billion years to grow.

Ten billion years for us is about two minutes for a black hole.

Theoretically speaking..

Flat Earth debunked in 2 minutes & How he filmed it

More FE debunking & More
Quote this message in a reply








Contact UsConspiracy Forum. No reg. required! Return to TopReturn to ContentRSS Syndication