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Proper Food Storage
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 512896
08-25-2019 09:47 PM

 




Post: #16
RE: Proper Food Storage
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As a single guy, I use to waste a lot of food. It's hard to grocery shop for just one. I can't eat a head of lettuce myself before it goes bad. I can't eat an entire load of bread before it dries out or becomes moldy. I can't eat an entire pound of ground hamburger. I can't finish an entire dozen eggs before they expire. This waste was making me mad. So, I developed a plan to change all that AND even begin to eat better.

My plan involved a LOT of changes. I also bought some kitchen appliances to assist in my plan. I bought a LEM vacuum sealer and a commercial grade meat slicer. I also bought and took up sous vide cooking. I bought some larger containers to brine meats in and use for sous vide cooking. I bought bulk rolls and boxes of precut zipper lock vacuum bags and some containers with vacuum sealing lids.

I started doing a lot of bulk cooking instead of cooking stuff every day. I now make all my own sandwich meats (without preservatives and more delicious than anything you can buy at the grocery store or deli). I'll brine and sous vide cook 20 pounds of beef, chicken, turkey at the same time. I'll slice or dice for sandwiches or other meals, vac seal, freeze. When I buy a eggs, I'll buy 4 dozen and scramble them all at the same time. I'll dice up a bunch of potatoes and fry cook them all too. I'll cook a few pounds of sausage. I'll dice up an couple onions and some bell peppers, add some shredded cheddar cheese. I'll then mix this all together, portion into vac seal bags and freeze. No waste. At breakfast, I can pull a bag from the freezer and toss in a pot of simmering or boiling water. I also buy veggies that I can portion, vac seal, and freeze for later use in my favorite recipes. I make bulk batches of soup, then portion, vac seal, freeze. I buy and can seal and freeze various fruits too.

I've cut my food waste down to almost zero. I now eat better because I can buy the foods I once avoided because of too much waste. I use vac seal containers in the fridge too. Foods will stay fresher a LOT longer if you remove the oxygen from the storage container. And I portion everything before freezing some I'm only removing from the freezer that which I'll eat today.

All of this has made going camping easier too. I have a large residential fridge/freezer in my RV. I pack the freezer full of single portion meals I previously cooked. Some are leftovers from meals I made last winter. I'm go camping all summer long. I'm camping right now. In my freezer here in the RV I know I have servings of hot dishes I made last winter. I can take one out of the freezer and use my sous vide cooker to thaw and heat it up ready to eat in about 30 minutes. I go home once a month to fill up the RV freezer with more meals stored in my freezer at home (and to do laundry at the same time). My sandwich meats are best! I've corned beef briskets that I brinded, sous vide cooked, thin sliced, vac sealed, and froze last January. I've got frozen dough for the rolls. Frozen cheese too. That's what I'm going to eat tonight with some tator tots.

I'm wasting very little and eating much better. And I don't have to cook something from scratch every day. I don't have a lot of dishes to wash every day because I'm not cooking every day. I bulk cook 80%+ of what I eat once or twice a month.
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Penelope Lane
I'm super in love!!
User ID: 511542
08-25-2019 09:54 PM

Posts: 17,754




Post: #17
RE: Proper Food Storage
LoP Guest  Wrote: (08-25-2019 09:47 PM)
As a single guy, I use to waste a lot of food. It's hard to grocery shop for just one. I can't eat a head of lettuce myself before it goes bad. I can't eat an entire load of bread before it dries out or becomes moldy. I can't eat an entire pound of ground hamburger. I can't finish an entire dozen eggs before they expire. This waste was making me mad. So, I developed a plan to change all that AND even begin to eat better.

My plan involved a LOT of changes. I also bought some kitchen appliances to assist in my plan. I bought a LEM vacuum sealer and a commercial grade meat slicer. I also bought and took up sous vide cooking. I bought some larger containers to brine meats in and use for sous vide cooking. I bought bulk rolls and boxes of precut zipper lock vacuum bags and some containers with vacuum sealing lids.

I started doing a lot of bulk cooking instead of cooking stuff every day. I now make all my own sandwich meats (without preservatives and more delicious than anything you can buy at the grocery store or deli). I'll brine and sous vide cook 20 pounds of beef, chicken, turkey at the same time. I'll slice or dice for sandwiches or other meals, vac seal, freeze. When I buy a eggs, I'll buy 4 dozen and scramble them all at the same time. I'll dice up a bunch of potatoes and fry cook them all too. I'll cook a few pounds of sausage. I'll dice up an couple onions and some bell peppers, add some shredded cheddar cheese. I'll then mix this all together, portion into vac seal bags and freeze. No waste. At breakfast, I can pull a bag from the freezer and toss in a pot of simmering or boiling water. I also buy veggies that I can portion, vac seal, and freeze for later use in my favorite recipes. I make bulk batches of soup, then portion, vac seal, freeze. I buy and can seal and freeze various fruits too.

I've cut my food waste down to almost zero. I now eat better because I can buy the foods I once avoided because of too much waste. I use vac seal containers in the fridge too. Foods will stay fresher a LOT longer if you remove the oxygen from the storage container. And I portion everything before freezing some I'm only removing from the freezer that which I'll eat today.

All of this has made going camping easier too. I have a large residential fridge/freezer in my RV. I pack the freezer full of single portion meals I previously cooked. Some are leftovers from meals I made last winter. I'm go camping all summer long. I'm camping right now. In my freezer here in the RV I know I have servings of hot dishes I made last winter. I can take one out of the freezer and use my sous vide cooker to thaw and heat it up ready to eat in about 30 minutes. I go home once a month to fill up the RV freezer with more meals stored in my freezer at home (and to do laundry at the same time). My sandwich meats are best! I've corned beef briskets that I brinded, sous vide cooked, thin sliced, vac sealed, and froze last January. I've got frozen dough for the rolls. Frozen cheese too. That's what I'm going to eat tonight with some tator tots.

I'm wasting very little and eating much better. And I don't have to cook something from scratch every day. I don't have a lot of dishes to wash every day because I'm not cooking every day. I bulk cook 80%+ of what I eat once or twice a month.

Balkpqbp Balkpqbp Balkpqbp

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Penelope Lane
I'm super in love!!
User ID: 511542
08-25-2019 10:36 PM

Posts: 17,754




Post: #18
RE: Proper Food Storage







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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 512902
08-25-2019 10:42 PM

 




Post: #19
RE: Proper Food Storage
In addition to what I posted above, I'm also looking at possibly buying a freeze dryer. There's one brand people buy the most for home use. But freeze drying is not as simple as using a microwave oven. You don't just put food in there and press a button. There's maintenance to do on the machine after every use, especially for oil based vacuum pump systems.

It can take 2 days to process 7 pounds of fresh food. It's noisy. It needs a dedicated 20 amp circuit. You have to do most of your own hardware repair if something breaks (too much effort and expense to get it onto a pallet and ship back to manufacture for repair .. and the local Maytag repair guy will likely be hesitant to touch the thing).

Freeze drying is basically a simple process . These are relatively simple and low tech machine. People have built their own freeze dryers and run them manually without a microcontroller. But it's not that difficult to screw up a batch or 2 once in a while (ice buildup, vacuum pump overheat, vacuum seal fail, electrical interruption, etc.). You need to run these in a climate controlled environment too. They will shut off if the vacuum pump overheats, and that will happen if your home or garage is not air conditioned. And you can't let the machine components freeze either.

Some food items freeze dry really well. I like freeze dried fruits. Once freeze dried, it's easy to turn it into a powder. You can then use that to flavor smoothies and milkshakes. I like freeze dried fruit in oatmeal and on cereal. I've used freeze dried veggies in fried rice and soups. If you powderize everything, then vac seal it, it will store for a very long time. Then during an emergency survival event, you can mix these various fruits, veggy, and even freeze dried meat powders into very nutritious drinks and soups. Just add water.

I would like to get a freeze dryer, but I'm hesitant about the commitment to actually use it. I would only get to use it 6 months of the year if I keep going camping the other 6 months of the year. That limits its productivity. I've heard weed growers buy these freeze dryers for quickly and safely drying their crop. It makes trimming the buds easy too because if you give the freeze dried batch a good shake, the leaves break off. No manual manicure required.

I probably won't get one. I want one and would use it non-stop. But I prefer to go camping in the summer instead of staying home maintaining a garden and operating a freeze dryer non-stop. And the garden might not even be a good idea. These home freeze dryers can't freeze dry an entire garden harvest at the same time. Your veggies will spoil before you could freeze dry it all in 7 (maybe 10) pound batches every 2 days.

I still want one.
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Penelope Lane
I'm super in love!!
User ID: 511542
08-25-2019 10:45 PM

Posts: 17,754




Post: #20
RE: Proper Food Storage
LoP Guest  Wrote: (08-25-2019 10:42 PM)
In addition to what I posted above, I'm also looking at possibly buying a freeze dryer. There's one brand people buy the most for home use. But freeze drying is not as simple as using a microwave oven. You don't just put food in there and press a button. There's maintenance to do on the machine after every use, especially for oil based vacuum pump systems.

It can take 2 days to process 7 pounds of fresh food. It's noisy. It needs a dedicated 20 amp circuit. You have to do most of your own hardware repair if something breaks (too much effort and expense to get it onto a pallet and ship back to manufacture for repair .. and the local Maytag repair guy will likely be hesitant to touch the thing).

Freeze drying is basically a simple process . These are relatively simple and low tech machine. People have built their own freeze dryers and run them manually without a microcontroller. But it's not that difficult to screw up a batch or 2 once in a while (ice buildup, vacuum pump overheat, vacuum seal fail, electrical interruption, etc.). You need to run these in a climate controlled environment too. They will shut off if the vacuum pump overheats, and that will happen if your home or garage is not air conditioned. And you can't let the machine components freeze either.

Some food items freeze dry really well. I like freeze dried fruits. Once freeze dried, it's easy to turn it into a powder. You can then use that to flavor smoothies and milkshakes. I like freeze dried fruit in oatmeal and on cereal. I've used freeze dried veggies in fried rice and soups. If you powderize everything, then vac seal it, it will store for a very long time. Then during an emergency survival event, you can mix these various fruits, veggy, and even freeze dried meat powders into very nutritious drinks and soups. Just add water.

I would like to get a freeze dryer, but I'm hesitant about the commitment to actually use it. I would only get to use it 6 months of the year if I keep going camping the other 6 months of the year. That limits its productivity. I've heard weed growers buy these freeze dryers for quickly and safely drying their crop. It makes trimming the buds easy too because if you give the freeze dried batch a good shake, the leaves break off. No manual manicure required.

I probably won't get one. I want one and would use it non-stop. But I prefer to go camping in the summer instead of staying home maintaining a garden and operating a freeze dryer non-stop. And the garden might not even be a good idea. These home freeze dryers can't freeze dry an entire garden harvest at the same time. Your veggies will spoil before you could freeze dry it all in 7 (maybe 10) pound batches every 2 days.

I still want one.

Awesome!

I would use that a lot too!! Make my own granola with dried berries! And smoothies!




yeah3

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PuddyCat
❌I Want Tuna❌
User ID: 348173
08-25-2019 10:50 PM

Posts: 11,880




Post: #21
RE: Proper Food Storage
Penelope Lane  Wrote: (08-25-2019 08:30 PM)
How many of you are wasting your food dollars by improper storage when you get home from the store!

I've seen many people just toss fresh produce into the fridge anywhere, in the same bags they came home with. If you do that you're going to have food rot very quickly.

I used to bring home fresh tomatoes, and put them into the fridge! How dumb is THAT?

chuckle


Let's start with the FRIDGE.

Quote:Refrigerate - The Basics

[Image: KTW3I1c.jpg]

https://www.eatright.org/homefoodsafety/...the-basics

[Image: mhpFrZ9.jpg]
Guilty as charged

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transforms people into nincompoops.

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Penelope Lane
I'm super in love!!
User ID: 511542
08-25-2019 10:52 PM

Posts: 17,754




Post: #22
RE: Proper Food Storage
here it is. i expect it will be perfect, because... me. chuckle i expect the outside to be slightly crunchy and caramelized. I also added toasted walnuts because... i can.


[Image: NYiS4Kd.jpg]

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PuddyCat
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User ID: 348173
08-25-2019 10:54 PM

Posts: 11,880




Post: #23
RE: Proper Food Storage
Penelope Lane  Wrote: (08-25-2019 10:52 PM)
here it is. i expect it will be perfect, because... me. chuckle i expect the outside to be slightly crunchy and caramelized. I also added toasted walnuts because... i can.


[Image: NYiS4Kd.jpg]

Forget Norseman, I'm popping over Smileyhungry

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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 512904
08-25-2019 11:09 PM

 




Post: #24
RE: Proper Food Storage
Really, I try to waste nothing. I even save all the juices in the bag when sous vide cook various meats like beef sirloin, chicken & turkey breasts. That juice makes the best ever broth base for soups and sauces. I like brining most meats I cook. Steaks I eat straight up I won't brine, but I'll brine for sandwich and diced meats. I filter those juices remaining in the sous vide cooking bag, then pour into ice cube trays and freeze. Once frozen, I put them in either a vac seal container (if going to use soon) or bag and vac seal. The juice I get from sous vide cooking a lower sirloin steak is the best! I use it for soups and other foods requiring a broth. When I cook lower sirloin to make pulled beef for BBQ sandwiches, I'll cook @ 145 for 1.5 hours. This also dissolves all the fat in the meat. That fat will be in the remaining broth. If you want to separate and discard that, put in fridge. The fat will float to the top and harden, making it easy to separate. Rather than discard it, use it for cooking grease when frying.
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Penelope Lane
I'm super in love!!
User ID: 511542
08-25-2019 11:12 PM

Posts: 17,754




Post: #25
RE: Proper Food Storage
LoP Guest  Wrote: (08-25-2019 11:09 PM)
Really, I try to waste nothing. I even save all the juices in the bag when sous vide cook various meats like beef sirloin, chicken & turkey breasts. That juice makes the best ever broth base for soups and sauces. I like brining most meats I cook. Steaks I eat straight up I won't brine, but I'll brine for sandwich and diced meats. I filter those juices remaining in the sous vide cooking bag, then pour into ice cube trays and freeze. Once frozen, I put them in either a vac seal container (if going to use soon) or bag and vac seal. The juice I get from sous vide cooking a lower sirloin steak is the best! I use it for soups and other foods requiring a broth. When I cook lower sirloin to make pulled beef for BBQ sandwiches, I'll cook @ 145 for 1.5 hours. This also dissolves all the fat in the meat. That fat will be in the remaining broth. If you want to separate and discard that, put in fridge. The fat will float to the top and harden, making it easy to separate. Rather than discard it, use it for cooking grease when frying.

When I make soup, I ALWAYS chill everything off really well, wait for the fat to rise, and take it out. Super easy to do in the winter, set the pot outside.

I HATE fatty tasting soups or stew. Generally I do not care for animal fat, unless well done bacon, and rarely that.

Except for butter, that's different.

chuckle

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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 425114
08-25-2019 11:30 PM

 




Post: #26
RE: Proper Food Storage
Penelope Lane  Wrote: (08-25-2019 10:52 PM)
here it is. i expect it will be perfect, because... me. chuckle i expect the outside to be slightly crunchy and caramelized. I also added toasted walnuts because... i can.


link to image: https://i.imgur.com/NYiS4Kd.jpg

Nice... I would butter that bread slowly and sprinkle some cinnamon sugar on it!

chuckle
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Penelope Lane
I'm super in love!!
User ID: 511542
08-25-2019 11:44 PM

Posts: 17,754




Post: #27
RE: Proper Food Storage
LoP Guest  Wrote: (08-25-2019 11:30 PM)
Penelope Lane  Wrote: (08-25-2019 10:52 PM)
here it is. i expect it will be perfect, because... me. chuckle i expect the outside to be slightly crunchy and caramelized. I also added toasted walnuts because... i can.


link to image: https://i.imgur.com/NYiS4Kd.jpg

Nice... I would butter that bread slowly and sprinkle some cinnamon sugar on it!

chuckle

chuckle

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sterling malory archer
Registered User
User ID: 465858
08-26-2019 12:21 AM

Posts: 297




Post: #28
RE: Proper Food Storage
LoP Guest  Wrote: (08-25-2019 09:47 PM)
I can't finish an entire dozen eggs before they expire.

my wife is in the food business, she has taught me a lot. For example, eggs take a long time to expire in the fridge. It takes us about 4-5 days to go through a dozen eggs and... she leaves them on the counter! They're fine. She also doesn't refrigerate butter.

A lot of what we've been told is lies. Or at least an extreme response to legal protection.

If you do NOT clean eggs after they've been laid, meaning you leave on the oils from the hen, they can be fine upwards of 9 months without refrigeration.
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Farmer Frank
lop guest
User ID: 512917
08-26-2019 12:53 AM

 




Post: #29
RE: Proper Food Storage
I have been freezing fresh made spaghetti sauce in JARS. I don't like plastic touching my food. And the paste tomatoes are really producing right now.

The problem with freezing liquids in glass jars is that water explands when it freezes and this can cause the glass to break. The sides of the jars make the expansion go upwards so you have to leave enough space that it won't reach the neck of the jar. But I have discovered that Ball makes freezer jars now. They don't have a neck at all, the lid is as wide as the sides of the jar.

Put up seven pints of sauce for the winter, and I have a lot more to go. Maybe I'll make tomato soup instead.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 512919
08-26-2019 01:05 AM

 




Post: #30
RE: Proper Food Storage
sterling malory archer  Wrote: (08-26-2019 12:21 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (08-25-2019 09:47 PM)
I can't finish an entire dozen eggs before they expire.

my wife is in the food business, she has taught me a lot. For example, eggs take a long time to expire in the fridge. It takes us about 4-5 days to go through a dozen eggs and... she leaves them on the counter! They're fine. She also doesn't refrigerate butter.

A lot of what we've been told is lies. Or at least an extreme response to legal protection.

If you do NOT clean eggs after they've been laid, meaning you leave on the oils from the hen, they can be fine upwards of 9 months without refrigeration.

I've been RV camping all summer. There are chickens around here where I'm camping now. I've found their eggs nests. They move from time to time. They share nests, I'm finding different colored eggs. I have a thermal image camera that helps me find the chickens hiding among the ground foliage. I take their freshest eggs, those on top that are still warm. I've become friends with 5 of the chickens. They'll come see me if they hear me outside. They follow me around. Three of them let me pick them up. They even sit outside my RV door waiting for me to come out. Sometimes they call for me and they've even knocked at the door with their beaks. All of them look delicious. They immediately started hanging around me when I started providing them a dish of clean water and sharing with them some Quaker oats and fresh veggies and fruits. They come out of the woods when I call them now. Very convenient storage solution if I ever get hungry for a broiled chicken. chuckle
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