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Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
Upside Down
Registered User
User ID: 479653
09-10-2019 06:55 AM

Posts: 24,504



Post: #31
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
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Pasta Lover  Wrote: (09-10-2019 06:52 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-10-2019 06:47 AM)
Why do we not have any examples of static electricity moving vast distances through the earth?

People do not get zapped by lightning through the earth, even 16.5 ft away from the strike. Why? Because the earth is not a great conductor.

Popcorn

The earth can be a good conductor. It depends on the composition of the soil. If it's wet, it probably conducts fairly well. I was thinking of a wind farm in a dry area such as a desert. I would think you could have some real static charges in the ground because it doesn't conduct well. Wet highly conductive soil wouldn't hold a static charge.

there are examples.

Candle
Reality are the hearts and minds of those who try.
Everything that is not illusion is confusion.

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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 443871
09-10-2019 06:58 AM

 



Post: #32
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-10-2019 06:55 AM)
Pasta Lover  Wrote: (09-10-2019 06:52 AM)
The earth can be a good conductor. It depends on the composition of the soil. If it's wet, it probably conducts fairly well. I was thinking of a wind farm in a dry area such as a desert. I would think you could have some real static charges in the ground because it doesn't conduct well. Wet highly conductive soil wouldn't hold a static charge.

Plenty of YouTube videos of farm livestock herds all dead because they were killed by a nearby lightening strike.

Yeah, a direct hit will fry you and other things fùcking dead.

But a hit into the earth will not.
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Pasta Lover
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User ID: 418981
09-10-2019 07:00 AM

Posts: 8,161



Post: #33
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-10-2019 06:55 AM)
Pasta Lover  Wrote: (09-10-2019 06:52 AM)
The earth can be a good conductor. It depends on the composition of the soil. If it's wet, it probably conducts fairly well. I was thinking of a wind farm in a dry area such as a desert. I would think you could have some real static charges in the ground because it doesn't conduct well. Wet highly conductive soil wouldn't hold a static charge.

Yeah, but no.

Find me some examples and I will readjust my thoughts on it.

The simple fact is that static electricity does not have enough potential (current) to do what you're proposing.

If I get a chance, I'll look around. I'm not claiming someone would get shocked, I'm simply theorizing that there could be static buildups around wind turbines. No doubt they produce static electricity. Just not sure what happens to it.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 443871
09-10-2019 07:02 AM

 



Post: #34
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
Pasta Lover  Wrote: (09-10-2019 07:00 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-10-2019 06:55 AM)
Yeah, but no.

Find me some examples and I will readjust my thoughts on it.

The simple fact is that static electricity does not have enough potential (current) to do what you're proposing.

If I get a chance, I'll look around. I'm not claiming someone would get shocked, I'm simply theorizing that there could be static buildups around wind turbines. No doubt they produce static electricity. Just not sure what happens to it.

I totally agree:) no worries. It doesn't travel far.

But it still doesn't explain Luv's "situation"..
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LoP Guest
lop guest
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09-10-2019 07:03 AM

 



Post: #35
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
Static dissipates, because it has low potential.
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Pasta Lover
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User ID: 418981
09-10-2019 07:09 AM

Posts: 8,161



Post: #36
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-10-2019 07:03 AM)
Static dissipates, because it has low potential.

Static can have any potential. When a thunderstorm moves in, there is enormous static charge between the earth and the upper atmosphere. It discharges because the air loses it's ability to insulate the static charge. Yes static electricity can dissipate, but only if there is a path.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 497065
09-10-2019 07:18 AM

 



Post: #37
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
what about using a volt meter to measure DC or AC voltage between metal stakes driven into the ground and set apart at whatever distance you're interested in ... if you're interested in voltage differences that would effect people or cattle they'd only need to be a few feet apart
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2newb4u
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User ID: 515008
09-10-2019 07:22 AM

Posts: 937



Post: #38
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
Upside Down  Wrote: (09-10-2019 05:46 AM)
My training says Ground is Ground.

It is Zero Volts.

I know that is not true, but the Third extremity in an electrical plug goes to a stick that is plugged into the earth.

They call it ground for a reason.





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JnGBs88sL0

Used to in the old days, but not anymore. It is tied to neutral now.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 443871
09-10-2019 08:11 AM

 



Post: #39
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
Pasta Lover  Wrote: (09-10-2019 07:09 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-10-2019 07:03 AM)
Static dissipates, because it has low potential.

Static can have any potential. When a thunderstorm moves in, there is enormous static charge between the earth and the upper atmosphere. It discharges because the air loses it's ability to insulate the static charge. Yes static electricity can dissipate, but only if there is a path.

Yes, and it still does NOT travel through the earth..
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singing spider
krautistan terrarist
User ID: 515131
09-10-2019 09:18 AM

Posts: 10,664



Post: #40
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-10-2019 08:11 AM)
Pasta Lover  Wrote: (09-10-2019 07:09 AM)
Static can have any potential. When a thunderstorm moves in, there is enormous static charge between the earth and the upper atmosphere. It discharges because the air loses it's ability to insulate the static charge. Yes static electricity can dissipate, but only if there is a path.

Yes, and it still does NOT travel through the earth..

and how does the grounding work then? chuckle

what makes you think it doesn't?
earth is not an insulator

[Image: electricity_lines.gif]

[Image: giphy-facebook_s.jpg]

[Image: G2FRDqb.gif]


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=92i5m3tV5XY
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 443871
09-10-2019 09:20 AM

 



Post: #41
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
singing spider  Wrote: (09-10-2019 09:18 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-10-2019 08:11 AM)
Yes, and it still does NOT travel through the earth..

and how does the grounding work then? chuckle

what makes you think it doesn't?
earth is not an insulator

link to image: https://accel.wisconsinpublicservice.com..._lines.gif

Read the thread, get the context.
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singing spider
krautistan terrarist
User ID: 515131
09-10-2019 09:29 AM

Posts: 10,664



Post: #42
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-10-2019 09:20 AM)
singing spider  Wrote: (09-10-2019 09:18 AM)
and how does the grounding work then? chuckle

what makes you think it doesn't?
earth is not an insulator

link to image: https://accel.wisconsinpublicservice.com..._lines.gif

Read the thread, get the context.

I know the context
just because you don't agree with op doesn't make earth an insulator and earth currents impossible
doesn't help your cause to be wrong

[Image: giphy-facebook_s.jpg]

[Image: G2FRDqb.gif]


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=92i5m3tV5XY
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2newb4u
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User ID: 515008
09-10-2019 10:22 AM

Posts: 937



Post: #43
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
At one time physical earth ground was half way between hot and neutral, IOW, 60 VAC if measured between ground and hot and 60VAC from ground to neutral. Now "ground" is physically tied to neutral (IE. 0 VAC measured from ground to neutral and 120 VAC measured from ground to hot.) If you don't believe me, measure it yourself.
(This post was last modified: 09-10-2019 10:30 AM by 2newb4u.) Quote this message in a reply
2newb4u
Registered User
User ID: 515008
09-10-2019 10:29 AM

Posts: 937



Post: #44
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
Anyway, after giving it some thought, I think the methodology to use for this is to physically drive a 6-8' grounding rod tied to a gold leaf electroscope.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 475286
09-10-2019 10:32 AM

 



Post: #45
RE: Ground Loop to detect ground currents?
Did someone turn HAARP back on?
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