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From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big "now"
from the photon's perspective
lop guest
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10-13-2019 02:28 AM

 




Post: #1
From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big "now"
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10-13-2019 02:29 AM

 




Post: #2
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
A Photons 2D universe?
Thread starterLHarriger Start dateOct 18, 2006
Oct 18, 2006
#1
LHarriger
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I was trying to envision the universe from the standpoint of a photon and it seems that based on the Lorentz contraction:
[itex]L = L_{0}\sqrt{1-u^2/c^2}[/itex]
since u = c this implies that, from the photons point of view, the length of the universe in the photons direction of travel contracts to zero.
Moreover, based on time dialation
[itex]\bar{t} = \frac{t}{\sqrt{1-u^2/c^2}}[/itex]
since u = c any time t-bar measured by an observer will correspond to a zero time measurement by the photon.
Does all this mean that a photon observes itself as stuck timeless and stationary on a 2D sheet?
This just seems like a curious state of affairs and I was wondering if my reasoning was correct.
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10-13-2019 02:30 AM

 




Post: #3
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
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10-13-2019 02:31 AM

 




Post: #4
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
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10-13-2019 02:31 AM

 




Post: #5
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
Length contraction is the phenomenon that a moving object's length is measured to be shorter than its proper length, which is the length as measured in the object's own rest frame.[1]
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10-13-2019 02:32 AM

 




Post: #6
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
Photon

Photons are emitted in a threaded laser beam
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10-13-2019 02:33 AM

 




Post: #7
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
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10-13-2019 02:34 AM

 




Post: #8
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
... If length contraction only contracts in the direction of motion, would we see time slow in other frames if we traveled "perpendicular" to time (what ever that may mean)?
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10-13-2019 02:35 AM

 




Post: #9
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
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10-13-2019 02:37 AM

 




Post: #10
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
dicerandom
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Well, from a geometrical outlook the time dilation and length contraction due to relative velocities in SR originates from the fact that the two observers world lines (i.e. their time axes) and therefore their lines of simultaneity (x axes) are rotated with respect to one another. If you had a second temporal dimension, and it was possible to have a velocity vector which was only rotated into one spatial and one temporal dimension, then I think you would have a situation where two observers would disagree on their spatial measurements, and on the readings of one set of their clocks, but not on the readings of their other set of clocks.

I not sure that such a situation would be possible though
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10-13-2019 02:39 AM

 




Post: #11
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
Photons are electrically neutral and are one of the rare particles that are identical to their antiparticle, the antiphoton. https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-a-phot...es-2699039
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10-13-2019 02:42 AM

 




Post: #12
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
Some particles are their own antiparticles, notably the force carriers like photons, the Z boson, and gluons, which mediate the electromagnetic force, the weak nuclear force, and the strong force, respectively. Particles that are their own antiparticles must be electrically neutral, because an aniparticle has the opposite electrical charge as its partner particle https://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=1153
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10-13-2019 02:44 AM

 




Post: #13
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
You also ask, in a follow-up question:

I have just thought of some stuff to add to my other question. When the antiphoton and photon collide, would they fuse? And if so, would they form a particle that has mass, or one that is massless. And what kind of particle is it?

The answer is yes, photons may collide and produce other particles. One familiar reaction is the low-energy annihilation of an electron and an anti-electron (known as a positron)-- the result is usually a pair of photons (sometimes you get more than two). You need at least two, in order to conserve both energy and momentum. This reaction also works in reverse -- a pair of photons may collide to make an electron-positron pair....''
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10-13-2019 02:47 AM

 




Post: #14
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
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10-13-2019 02:49 AM

 




Post: #15
RE: From my "photonic perspective" does time pass by? Is it all one big &quo...
Two-dimensional space (also known as bi-dimensional space) is a geometric setting in which

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-dimensional_space

two values (called parameters) are required to determine the position of an element (i.e., point). The set ℝ2 of pairs of real numbers with appropriate structure often serves as the canonical example of a two-dimensional Euclidian space. For a generalization of the concept, see dimension.

Two-dimensional space can be seen as a projection of the physical universe onto a plane.
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