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computer experts
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 439412
06-13-2018 08:06 PM

 



Post: #31
RE: computer experts
Advertisement
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-13-2018 07:45 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-13-2018 07:11 PM)
Huzzah! A white knight to your rescue. He would like to help but unfortunately he only speaks 1337 and all his friends are 1337 h4x0r5, besides he's behind 7 proxies and a dickhead to boot. Maybe you could use a potato to access the internet.

Take your meds

What, and miss OP playing you for the asshole you are, not a chance.
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Luvapottamus
Registered User
User ID: 372884
06-13-2018 08:12 PM

Posts: 2,310



Post: #32
RE: computer experts
Every device with a network chip is easy to hack.

Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigationJump to search
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) is a United States wiretapping law passed in 1994, during the presidency of Bill Clinton (Pub. L. No. 103-414, 108 Stat. 4279, codified at 47 USC 1001-1010).

CALEA's purpose is to enhance the ability of law enforcement agencies to conduct lawful interception of communication by requiring that telecommunications carriers and manufacturers of telecommunications equipment modify and design their equipment, facilities, and services to ensure that they have built-in capabilities for targeted surveillance, allowing federal agencies to selectively wiretap any telephone traffic; it has since been extended to cover broadband Internet and VoIP traffic. Some government agencies argue that it covers mass surveillance of communications rather than just tapping specific lines and that not all CALEA-based access requires a warrant.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communicat...cement_Act

Until CALEA is repealed or ammended you are vulnerable.

There is no such thing as sovereign debt. Reinstate Greenbacks.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vb5OQUElilo
http://taxwallstreetparty.org/
United Front Against Austerity
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Luvapottamus
Registered User
User ID: 372884
06-13-2018 08:13 PM

Posts: 2,310



Post: #33
RE: computer experts
Because even if it's not Law Enforcement or Spy Agencies hacking you, hackers are figuring out all these backdoors.

That is why you have UPDATES from Microsoft and Apple.

Spook agencies have to REPLACE the vulnerabilities their employees at Microsoft and Apple wrote in with NEW ONES when they know hackers found them.

They have employees at CISCO, HP, Barracuda Networks, Cloudflare, every company...and grad students at the mirror linux servers at universities.

Inserting backdoors and updating them all the time.

So quit buying technology until congress DEALS WITH the Ed Snowden revelations.

Nobody on here (including the spooks probably) has a secure computer or secure network.

As much as they want to pretend. Can't happen. Unless they are in a SCIF

FCC rule 15 made sure of that:

This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/47/15.19

Why does your device have to accept interference that causes undesired operation?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempest_(codename)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_ANT_catalog

There is no such thing as sovereign debt. Reinstate Greenbacks.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vb5OQUElilo
http://taxwallstreetparty.org/
United Front Against Austerity
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 410972
06-13-2018 08:54 PM

 



Post: #34
RE: computer experts
I still want to know how the wifi got turned on because I don't have a wifi account.

I use a modem.
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Luvapottamus
Registered User
User ID: 372884
06-13-2018 09:02 PM

Posts: 2,310



Post: #35
RE: computer experts
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-13-2018 08:54 PM)
I still want to know how the wifi got turned on because I don't have a wifi account.

I use a modem.

The WIFI on the laptop or the modem?

If the modem has no WIFI, and they turned the WIFI on on the laptop, they rooted the laptop and gained administrator privileges.

You can remove the WIFI card on the laptop but you'll still be rooted.

Check your access logs. See who logged in.

If it's the modem, you're screwed too.

There is no such thing as sovereign debt. Reinstate Greenbacks.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vb5OQUElilo
http://taxwallstreetparty.org/
United Front Against Austerity
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 423633
06-13-2018 09:05 PM

 



Post: #36
RE: computer experts
this is why you should always store your laptop in a faraday cage

at least try wrapping it in tin foil
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Luvapottamus
Registered User
User ID: 372884
06-13-2018 09:07 PM

Posts: 2,310



Post: #37
RE: computer experts
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-13-2018 09:05 PM)
this is why you should always store your laptop in a faraday cage

at least try wrapping it in tin foil

That won't work.

chuckle

There is no such thing as sovereign debt. Reinstate Greenbacks.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vb5OQUElilo
http://taxwallstreetparty.org/
United Front Against Austerity
Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 410972
06-13-2018 09:10 PM

 



Post: #38
RE: computer experts
Luvapottamus  Wrote: (06-13-2018 09:02 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-13-2018 08:54 PM)
I still want to know how the wifi got turned on because I don't have a wifi account.

I use a modem.

The WIFI on the laptop or the modem?

If the modem has no WIFI, and they turned the WIFI on on the laptop, they rooted the laptop and gained administrator privileges.

You can remove the WIFI card on the laptop but you'll still be rooted.

Check your access logs. See who logged in.

If it's the modem, you're screwed too.

The wifi is on the laptop.

These (but I think that it is one person with superior computer skills; he had a business "helping authors" that seemed to be about comps).

I don't know how to check "access logs," but this gives me a start to get some tech assistance here. Thank you.

This is a guy who thinks that he was born with "administrator privileges."
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Luvapottamus
Registered User
User ID: 372884
06-13-2018 09:21 PM

Posts: 2,310



Post: #39
RE: computer experts
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-13-2018 09:10 PM)
Luvapottamus  Wrote: (06-13-2018 09:02 PM)
The WIFI on the laptop or the modem?

If the modem has no WIFI, and they turned the WIFI on on the laptop, they rooted the laptop and gained administrator privileges.

You can remove the WIFI card on the laptop but you'll still be rooted.

Check your access logs. See who logged in.

If it's the modem, you're screwed too.

The wifi is on the laptop.

These (but I think that it is one person with superior computer skills; he had a business "helping authors" that seemed to be about comps).

I don't know how to check "access logs," but this gives me a start to get some tech assistance here. Thank you.

This is a guy who thinks that he was born with "administrator privileges."

That's fine.

Easiest thing to do is wipe the hard disk, reinstall windows and drivers AFTER REMOVING the WIFI CARD.

But it takes a long time, and you have to backup all your crap first.

In any case have your geek friend check the logs.

Also there's a recently discovered VPN problem:

VPNFilter router malware is a lot worse than everyone thought
More affected devices. More damage. And what looks like an escalation in attacks
By Richard Chirgwin 7 Jun 2018 at 05:02

Asus, D-Link, Huawei, Ubiquiti, UPVEL, and ZTE: these are the vendors newly named by Cisco's Talos Intelligence whose products are being exploited by the VPNFilter malware.

As well as the expanded list of impacted devices, Talos warned that VPNFilter now attacks endpoints behind the firewall, and sports a “poison pill” to brick an infected network device if necessary.

When it was discovered last month, VPNFilter had hijacked half a million devices – but only SOHO devices from Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and QNAP storage kit, were commandeered....

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/06/07...e_thought/

There is no such thing as sovereign debt. Reinstate Greenbacks.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vb5OQUElilo
http://taxwallstreetparty.org/
United Front Against Austerity
(This post was last modified: 06-13-2018 09:24 PM by Luvapottamus.) Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 410972
06-13-2018 09:45 PM

 



Post: #40
RE: computer experts
Luvapottamus  Wrote: (06-13-2018 09:21 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-13-2018 09:10 PM)
The wifi is on the laptop.

These (but I think that it is one person with superior computer skills; he had a business "helping authors" that seemed to be about comps).

I don't know how to check "access logs," but this gives me a start to get some tech assistance here. Thank you.

This is a guy who thinks that he was born with "administrator privileges."

That's fine.

Easiest thing to do is wipe the hard disk, reinstall windows and drivers AFTER REMOVING the WIFI CARD.

But it takes a long time, and you have to backup all your crap first.

In any case have your geek friend check the logs.

Also there's a recently discovered VPN problem:

VPNFilter router malware is a lot worse than everyone thought
More affected devices. More damage. And what looks like an escalation in attacks
By Richard Chirgwin 7 Jun 2018 at 05:02

Asus, D-Link, Huawei, Ubiquiti, UPVEL, and ZTE: these are the vendors newly named by Cisco's Talos Intelligence whose products are being exploited by the VPNFilter malware.

As well as the expanded list of impacted devices, Talos warned that VPNFilter now attacks endpoints behind the firewall, and sports a “poison pill” to brick an infected network device if necessary.

When it was discovered last month, VPNFilter had hijacked half a million devices – but only SOHO devices from Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and QNAP storage kit, were commandeered....

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/06/07...e_thought/

Thank you.
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