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Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
He Man
Another day in paradise
User ID: 426188
06-13-2018 05:43 PM

Posts: 5,363



Post: #31
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
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Hamburgerwagon  Wrote: (06-13-2018 05:37 PM)
Nah, we will just quit bumping you and let the thread die now.

Just because it seems like the beach is still the beach does not mean that sea levels are not rising. They are and it will cause more and more flooding over time.

How Much Did Sea Levels Rise Over the Past 50 Years? A Lot If You Live on the U.S. Gulf or East Coasts

[Image: GwD9jKW.jpg]

Sea levels are rising so fast along the U.S. East and Gulf coasts that some places have seen a greater increase in the last 50 years than the global average over the past 130 years. (Examples include Atlantic City, NJ; Norfolk, VA; and Galveston, TX.)

Other tide stations, such as those at New York City and Washington, DC, have rates of sea level rise over these 50 years that approach the global rate over the 130-year period. (The 50-year rate of rise between 1963 and 2012 is drawn from the latest 50-year fit available as of this post and is compared with the global average sea level rise from 1880 to 2009.)

These and other tide stations are featured in our updated Sea Level Rise and Global Warming infographic. Those who are taking steps to prepare and protect their coastal communities are taking their local tide stations into account.

Sea levels in the U.S. are rising fastest along the East Coast and Gulf of Mexico
Updated graphic from the Sea Level Rise and Global Warming infographic, which features the latest 50-year trend (1963-2012) available at time of revision (April 2014) NOAA Data: [email protected] and updated annually at http://1.usa.gov/1mi4AHN.

Why is the rate of local sea level rise different from the global rate?
It turns out that figuring out the global mean sea level rise is notoriously difficult. This is due in part because all the factors that influence the elevation of the sea — such as variations in tidal cycles, local land movement, groundwater depletion, ocean currents, land ice changes, and so forth — have to be independently verified before local tide stations around the world, plus satellite data, can yield the mean sea level rise rate.

For example, Alaska terrain is rising much faster than global sea level rise and local sea levels there have been dropping as a result. Meanwhile, Louisiana is sinking, which contributes to large local sea level rise. It would be hard to figure out global sea level change with just those two tide stations. However, when you can compare stations around the world, and know the other factors influencing local sea elevations, one can figure out the global sea level rise rate. The most well known rate of global sea level rise published for 1880-2009 is around 8 inches (210 mm).

A note on the 50-year rate featured in the 2014 update to the infographic
With the “8 inches since 1880” global mean sea level rise as a “yardstick,” our original infographic used the linear mean sea level trend (tide station start year to 2006) to calculate sea level rise from 1880 to present. However, it was pointed out that the short record of some of the stations used provided limited confidence for extrapolating to 1880. Hence we switched to the 50-year trend for stations that had complete data over the entire 50-year period. Since NOAA updates these 50-year fits each year the full table provided by NOAA is preserved in the methodology and assumptions for the data supporting this infographic.

Given the projected increase in global sea level rise, the most recent 50-year mean sea level trends by NOAA is probably a minimum projection for the next half century.


Go here for the article and the fun infographic:
https://blog.ucsusa.org/brenda-ekwurzel/...coasts-514

Making LOP Great again since 06-07-2013!

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Lets hope 2018 is a worse year for kleptocratic regimes, oligarchies, plutocracies and autocratic hell holes.
(This post was last modified: 06-13-2018 05:44 PM by He Man.) Quote this message in a reply
Damrod
Seeker of knowledge
User ID: 445680
06-13-2018 05:46 PM

Posts: 2,815



Post: #32
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
He Man  Wrote: (06-13-2018 05:43 PM)
Hamburgerwagon  Wrote: (06-13-2018 05:37 PM)
Nah, we will just quit bumping you and let the thread die now.

Just because it seems like the beach is still the beach does not mean that sea levels are not rising. They are and it will cause more and more flooding over time.

How Much Did Sea Levels Rise Over the Past 50 Years? A Lot If You Live on the U.S. Gulf or East Coasts

[Image: GwD9jKW.jpg]

Sea levels are rising so fast along the U.S. East and Gulf coasts that some places have seen a greater increase in the last 50 years than the global average over the past 130 years. (Examples include Atlantic City, NJ; Norfolk, VA; and Galveston, TX.)

Other tide stations, such as those at New York City and Washington, DC, have rates of sea level rise over these 50 years that approach the global rate over the 130-year period. (The 50-year rate of rise between 1963 and 2012 is drawn from the latest 50-year fit available as of this post and is compared with the global average sea level rise from 1880 to 2009.)

These and other tide stations are featured in our updated Sea Level Rise and Global Warming infographic. Those who are taking steps to prepare and protect their coastal communities are taking their local tide stations into account.

Sea levels in the U.S. are rising fastest along the East Coast and Gulf of Mexico
Updated graphic from the Sea Level Rise and Global Warming infographic, which features the latest 50-year trend (1963-2012) available at time of revision (April 2014) NOAA Data: [email protected] and updated annually at http://1.usa.gov/1mi4AHN.

Why is the rate of local sea level rise different from the global rate?
It turns out that figuring out the global mean sea level rise is notoriously difficult. This is due in part because all the factors that influence the elevation of the sea — such as variations in tidal cycles, local land movement, groundwater depletion, ocean currents, land ice changes, and so forth — have to be independently verified before local tide stations around the world, plus satellite data, can yield the mean sea level rise rate.

For example, Alaska terrain is rising much faster than global sea level rise and local sea levels there have been dropping as a result. Meanwhile, Louisiana is sinking, which contributes to large local sea level rise. It would be hard to figure out global sea level change with just those two tide stations. However, when you can compare stations around the world, and know the other factors influencing local sea elevations, one can figure out the global sea level rise rate. The most well known rate of global sea level rise published for 1880-2009 is around 8 inches (210 mm).

A note on the 50-year rate featured in the 2014 update to the infographic
With the “8 inches since 1880” global mean sea level rise as a “yardstick,” our original infographic used the linear mean sea level trend (tide station start year to 2006) to calculate sea level rise from 1880 to present. However, it was pointed out that the short record of some of the stations used provided limited confidence for extrapolating to 1880. Hence we switched to the 50-year trend for stations that had complete data over the entire 50-year period. Since NOAA updates these 50-year fits each year the full table provided by NOAA is preserved in the methodology and assumptions for the data supporting this infographic.

Given the projected increase in global sea level rise, the most recent 50-year mean sea level trends by NOAA is probably a minimum projection for the next half century.


Go here for the article and the fun infographic:
https://blog.ucsusa.org/brenda-ekwurzel/...coasts-514

[Image: 2l2uqs.jpg]
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 356662
06-13-2018 05:48 PM

 



Post: #33
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
Or is it land sinking, spreading out and settling as in the continuation of continental drift? How can the volume of all the waters of the world be accurately measured with the container (land) continually shifting, rising, sinking? Is all this extra water coming in from outer space? The water at the poles will be water at the poles. Plus or minus even 10 degrees centigrade when the average temperature is well below freezing STILL, means the ice and snow will still be ice and snow.
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Dr Phil
lop guest
User ID: 304026
06-13-2018 06:02 PM

 



Post: #34
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ  Wrote: (06-13-2018 04:45 PM)
Quote:Singer is arguably the granddaddy of modern-day climate change denialism. His latest commentary echoes the same misinformation as his recent Wall Street Journal commentary, “The Sea Is Rising, but Not Because of Climate Change.” It presents a virtual laundry list of discredited climate change denier talking points. No, sea levels aren’t rising at a steady rate — they are in fact accelerating. The rate of ice sheet melting in Greenland and Antarctica is also accelerating, in part due to warming oceans that erode the ice from beneath, destabilizing it.



These observations fly in the face of those who try to argue that sea level will continue to rise at the same rate, which is why legitimate scientific conclusions are reached not in op-ed pieces such as Singer’s, but through careful peer-reviewed research.

That research shows that sea levels are rising and human-caused climate change is the cause. Don’t just take our word for it; help yourself to the mountain of scientific literature demonstrating these inescapable conclusions.

Singer indeed knows that he doesn’t have the facts on his side, so he engages in distortion and diversion. For example, he takes a swipe at one of us as an “alarmist,” attacking the “Hockey Stick” curve published more than two decades ago demonstrating that recent warming is unprecedented in at least a thousand years. That work has been overwhelmingly reaffirmed and extended by subsequent work by numerous independent scientific teams. But professional climate change deniers continue to attack the curve because it is an iconic reminder of the profound impact that we are now having on this planet.

Perhaps because of the images of flooding that now permeate news broadcasts around the world as the seas rise and invade our coastlines, we are seeing a renewed attack on climate science: this time to discredit the link between human-caused climate change and sea level rise. Yet, even wealthy stretches of coastal real estate are feeling the pain of increased coastal flooding, the incidence of which has doubled over the past 30 years.

It is time to pivot and confront this head on. Even Singer’s opinion pieces do not deny the fact that sea level is rising. This is an issue that we can all get behind. Ensuring a secure coastal economy will benefit Americans of every stripe. If in doubt, just take in the symbolism painted inside of the dome of the U.S. Capitol building next time you walk through and note Minerva (science), Neptune (marine), and Mercury (commerce).

more:
http://thehill.com/opinion/energy-enviro...level-rise

First off, Anonymous, may I ask where in the world you live?

My family has owned beachfront property for about 35 years. High tide and low tide are at the exact same levels they were the first day I played on that beach as a kid.

There are certainly places in the world that can experience sea level rise, mainly in monsoon territory, "The sea level" is not rising, or it would be rising everywhere, especially in the countries closest to the glaciers.
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Dr Phil
lop guest
User ID: 304026
06-13-2018 06:17 PM

 



Post: #35
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
He Man  Wrote: (06-13-2018 05:43 PM)
https://blog.ucsusa.org/brenda-ekwurzel/...coasts-514

Want to know how I know you don't have any beachfront property on the East Coast of USA/Canada?


Scenario: You've turned on your tv, and it says it's pouring rain in your area. You look out your window, and it's a nice sunny day without a cloud in the sky. The weather report comes on again, and says it's pouring rain. There's even a guy standing under an umbrella giving the report, with rain falling all around him. You look out your window again, and it's still sunny and clear.

Is it raining, or is it a sunny day?
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Eldog Wilbury
Registered User
User ID: 441549
06-13-2018 07:00 PM

Posts: 1,643



Post: #36
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
Eldog Wilbury  Wrote: (06-13-2018 04:55 PM)
I live by the sea,if I go by the last 40+ years of my own observations,the shoreline is exactly where it was then.

Debate over.
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grav
Registered User
User ID: 332479
06-13-2018 07:00 PM

Posts: 985



Post: #37
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
Louisiana is losing a football field sized parcel of land every 100 minutes. Or so they say. The water is not rising. The land is washing away, thanks to manmade canals and deforestation. Cypress trees are vital to the preservation of wetlands which protect inland communities.
For what great need do people have that loggers clearcut marshes for these trees? Why, for knucklehead gardeners to use cypress mulch around their banal manicured landscapes.

Just one example of why we will always be easy pickins' for the PTB. We will buy their products and send our children off to fight in wars because Homo ignoranus will never grow up.
[Image: th?id=OIP.ji0V6lupmDjslx38-PIdDwHaDf&pid=Api]

"A little learning is a dang'rous thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring"
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Illegitimi non carborundum, platygaeanae!
GE = 8xd^; FE = |___180°___|
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She Man
lop guest
User ID: 441646
06-13-2018 07:04 PM

 



Post: #38
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
My debate is this. Scream1




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPvgTVT4nxI

They will feel it first. lol
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 443824
06-13-2018 07:05 PM

 



Post: #39
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
Everybody is getting fatter. Lands are sinking.
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She Man
lop guest
User ID: 441646
06-13-2018 07:11 PM

 



Post: #40
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 434171
06-13-2018 07:31 PM

 



Post: #41
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
https://www.iceagenow.com/Milankovitch_C...e_Ages.htm


Ice Core Samples and the Milankovich Cycle. Pay attention to the graph, where we are and what will happen next.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 444910
06-13-2018 07:33 PM

 



Post: #42
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
Damrod  Wrote: (06-13-2018 05:46 PM)
He Man  Wrote: (06-13-2018 05:43 PM)
Just because it seems like the beach is still the beach does not mean that sea levels are not rising. They are and it will cause more and more flooding over time.

How Much Did Sea Levels Rise Over the Past 50 Years? A Lot If You Live on the U.S. Gulf or East Coasts

link to image: https://i.imgur.com/GwD9jKW.jpg

Sea levels are rising so fast along the U.S. East and Gulf coasts that some places have seen a greater increase in the last 50 years than the global average over the past 130 years. (Examples include Atlantic City, NJ; Norfolk, VA; and Galveston, TX.)

Other tide stations, such as those at New York City and Washington, DC, have rates of sea level rise over these 50 years that approach the global rate over the 130-year period. (The 50-year rate of rise between 1963 and 2012 is drawn from the latest 50-year fit available as of this post and is compared with the global average sea level rise from 1880 to 2009.)

These and other tide stations are featured in our updated Sea Level Rise and Global Warming infographic. Those who are taking steps to prepare and protect their coastal communities are taking their local tide stations into account.

Sea levels in the U.S. are rising fastest along the East Coast and Gulf of Mexico
Updated graphic from the Sea Level Rise and Global Warming infographic, which features the latest 50-year trend (1963-2012) available at time of revision (April 2014) NOAA Data: [email protected] and updated annually at http://1.usa.gov/1mi4AHN.

Why is the rate of local sea level rise different from the global rate?
It turns out that figuring out the global mean sea level rise is notoriously difficult. This is due in part because all the factors that influence the elevation of the sea — such as variations in tidal cycles, local land movement, groundwater depletion, ocean currents, land ice changes, and so forth — have to be independently verified before local tide stations around the world, plus satellite data, can yield the mean sea level rise rate.

For example, Alaska terrain is rising much faster than global sea level rise and local sea levels there have been dropping as a result. Meanwhile, Louisiana is sinking, which contributes to large local sea level rise. It would be hard to figure out global sea level change with just those two tide stations. However, when you can compare stations around the world, and know the other factors influencing local sea elevations, one can figure out the global sea level rise rate. The most well known rate of global sea level rise published for 1880-2009 is around 8 inches (210 mm).

A note on the 50-year rate featured in the 2014 update to the infographic
With the “8 inches since 1880” global mean sea level rise as a “yardstick,” our original infographic used the linear mean sea level trend (tide station start year to 2006) to calculate sea level rise from 1880 to present. However, it was pointed out that the short record of some of the stations used provided limited confidence for extrapolating to 1880. Hence we switched to the 50-year trend for stations that had complete data over the entire 50-year period. Since NOAA updates these 50-year fits each year the full table provided by NOAA is preserved in the methodology and assumptions for the data supporting this infographic.

Given the projected increase in global sea level rise, the most recent 50-year mean sea level trends by NOAA is probably a minimum projection for the next half century.


Go here for the article and the fun infographic:
https://blog.ucsusa.org/brenda-ekwurzel/...coasts-514

link to image: http://i67.tinypic.com/2l2uqs.jpg

They evacuated and got to higher ground. Good for them!
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Luvapottamus
Registered User
User ID: 372884
06-13-2018 07:38 PM

Posts: 2,289



Post: #43
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
[Image: 12_15_seaLevel_left.gif]
(from NASA)
I predict it will rise at least another 150mm(6 inches) during the next century.

Over the long term however:

[Image: seaLevelChangeThroughTime.jpg]
http://www.bgs.ac.uk/discoveringGeology/...astal.html
(From the British geological survey)

Goes up and down.

There is no such thing as sovereign debt. Reinstate Greenbacks.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vb5OQUElilo
http://taxwallstreetparty.org/
United Front Against Austerity
(This post was last modified: 06-13-2018 07:41 PM by Luvapottamus.) Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 445867
06-13-2018 08:06 PM

 



Post: #44
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
Ice shrinking in one place, growing in others. Yes, the beaches are still where they used to be. Has not changed all that much. What else ya got?
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Hamburgerwagon
Head LOP Data Miner
User ID: 249781
06-13-2018 08:09 PM

Posts: 4,429



Post: #45
RE: Let’s have a worthy debate about sea level rise
So, here is what I gather from this thread.

2 people want to try really hard to push this agenda using customized facts.

Everyone else thinks it is retarded and the most stupid thing they have ever heard.

I dont think your indoctrination techniques are working here.
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