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THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 461431
09-11-2018 12:53 AM

 



Post: #46
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
Advertisement
With Antarctica included, here's the 200 "proofs" flat erfers like tout like a bible, getting pulverized.


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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 460457
09-11-2018 01:10 AM

 



Post: #47
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-11-2018 12:19 AM)
VM  Wrote: (09-10-2018 11:45 PM)
Word of warning ... UnAcceptance is a shill bait for the controllers ..

A fountain of misinformation ...

Instead of discussing the topic at hand and the information presented you just popped in to attack the messenger. Now THAT is some shill tactics right there. Move along back to your flat Earth playpen thread where facts don't matter. You'll be right at home.

Its bosses only allow it to have its ass handed to it twice a day in the Fear Earth thread.

It needs to find other threads to have its ass handed to it, because pulling with gravity is not working to remove its head from this ass.

Headass
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 459459
09-11-2018 01:13 AM

 



Post: #48
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
WHERE'S THE SKY DOME AND ICE WALL YOU'RE HIDING? WE'VE ALL SEEN BLOODY HIGH DEFINITION SNOW BEFORE DICKHEADS
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Texas Uncensored
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User ID: 138491
09-11-2018 01:16 AM

Posts: 287



Post: #49
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
Corosive  Wrote: (09-09-2018 05:24 AM)
Haha you lost me at flat earth.

LOL, lost me at some thinking it circles the Earth.

[Image: YzNbSwq.gif]

http://twitter.com/texasuncensored
http://www.texasuncensored.blogspot.com

Got crypto? https://www.coinbase.com/join/52ef494f6724376d680000d3
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 461742
09-12-2018 02:08 PM

 



Post: #50
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
LIVE cams from 21 different spots.
https://www.webkams.com/antarctica
Notify everyone if you see the 90 thousand ninjas stopping everyone from exploring Antarctica.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 461742
09-12-2018 02:57 PM

 



Post: #51
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
LIVE from McMurdo Station
https://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/mcmWebCam.cfm

McMurdo Station Weather

September 12, 2018 12:09 PM UTC
Temperature -26° C -15° F
Wind Chill Out of Range
Wind Speed 0 knots
Air Pressure 29.29 inches
More Antarctic Webcams

South Pole Station Webcams
Palmer Station Webcams

NOTE: Camera images are often obscured due to harsh and unpredictable weather conditions.

McMurdo Station (77°51'S, 166°40'E), the main U.S. station in Antarctica, is a coastal station at the southern tip of Ross Island, about 3,864 km (2,415 miles) south of Christchurch, New Zealand, and 1,360 km (850 miles) north of the South Pole. The original station was built in 1955 to 1956 for the International Geophysical Year. Today's station is the primary logistics facility for supply of inland stations and remote field camps, and is also the waste management center for much of the U.S. Antarctic Program. Year-round and summer science projects are supported at McMurdo.

The station has a harbor, landing strips on the sea ice and shelf ice, and a helicopter pad. The three airfields-the annual sea-ice runway, Pegasus White Ice Runway, and Williams Field Skiway-are used at different times of the year for different reasons. Repair facilities, dormitories, administrative buildings, a firehouse, power plant, water distillation plant, wharf, stores, clubs, warehouses, a science support center, and the first-class, 4,320 square-meter Crary Lab are linked by above-ground water, sewer, telephone, and power lines.
Additional Links and Resources

NSF - Office of Polar Programs
NSF in the Antarctic
Significant U.S. Science Discoveries from Antarctica
The Antarctic Sun, Science Section

The mean annual temperature is -18°C (0°F). Temperatures may reach 8°C (46°F) in summer and -50°C (-58°F) in winter. The average wind is 12 knots, but winds have exceeded 100 knots.

Research in multiple fields is performed at and near McMurdo Station, including Astrophysics and Geospace Sciences, Earth Sciences, Glaciology, Integrated System Science, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, and Organisms and Ecosystems. Participants of the Antarctic Artists and Writers Program also work at sites in the area. For information about projects supported at McMurdo Station--and based from McMurdo, such as deep field projects in East and West Antarctica--see the USAP Science Planning Summaries on the Science Support page. Historical information on previous seasons can be found at the Science Planning Summaries Archives.

To find out more about life at U.S. Antarctic research stations, see the Around the Continent section of The Antarctic Sun.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 461742
09-12-2018 03:22 PM

 



Post: #52
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
Australia must be involved in the cover up.
No. There is no cover up.
This is LIVE footage provided by the government of Australia.
http://www.antarctica.gov.au/webcams
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 461742
09-12-2018 07:16 PM

 



Post: #53
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
Stunning aurora from the South Pole, which is a place on a spherical earth and not onna flat erf.


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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 461742
09-12-2018 07:37 PM

 



Post: #54
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
Some strange places at the South Pole. 10 minutes long. Concise and interesting.


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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 461742
09-12-2018 11:35 PM

 



Post: #55
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
If this area is forbidden to go to, then why are there cruises that go there?
https://www.expeditions.com/destinations...xperience/
Antarctica is mysterious, but not mythical. It currently resides at the South Pole on Earth. The South Pole is one of those inconvenient things not to be found on a flat-erf map.
Book your cruise now!
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 461742
09-13-2018 12:00 AM

 



Post: #56
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
HOLY EXPEDITIONS BATMAN!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_An...xpeditions
Here is a partial list for those who do not want to click the link.
Pre-exploration theories

600 BC – 300 BC — Greek Philosophers theorize Spherical Earth with North and South Polar regions.
150 AD — Ptolemy published Geographia, which notes Terra Australis Incognita

Pre-19th century

7th century — Ui-te-Rangiora claimed to have sighted southern ice fields.
13th century — Polynesians settle Auckland Islands (50° S)[1][2][3][4]
1501–1502 — Gonçalo Coelho and Amerigo Vespucci potentially sail to (52° S)
1522 — Ferdinand Magellan – first circumnavigation discovers Strait of Magellan (54° S)
1578 — Francis Drake discovers Drake Passage
1599 — Dirk Gerritsz – potentially sails to (64° S)
1603 — Gabriel de Castilla – potentially sails to (64° S)
1615 — Jacob le Maire and Willem Schouten first to sail around Cape Horn cross (56° S)
1619 — Garcia de Nodal expedition – circumnavigate Tierra del Fuego and discover Diego Ramirez Islands (56°30′S 68°43′W)
1675 — Anthony de la Roché discovers South Georgia (54°15′00″S 36°45′00″W), the first ever land discovered south of the Antarctic Convergence
1698–1699 — Edmond Halley sails to (52° S)
1720 — Captain George Shelvocke – sails to (61° 30′ S)
1739 — Jean-Baptiste Charles Bouvet de Lozier – discovers Bouvet Island (54°26′S 3°24′E)
1771 — James Cook – HM Bark Endeavour expedition
1771–1772 — First French Antarctic Expedition – led by Yves-Joseph de Kerguelen-Trémarec discovers Kerguelen Islands (49°15′S 69°35′E)
1772–1775 — James Cook – sails HMS Resolution crossing Antarctic Circle in January 1773 and December 1773. On 30 January 1774 he reaches 71° 10′ S, his Farthest South, coming within about 75 miles of the Antarctic mainland without seeing it.

19th century

1780s to 1839 — American and British whalers and sealers make incidental discoveries
1819 — William Smith discovers South Shetland Islands (62°00′S 058°00′W), the first land discovered south of 60° south latitude.
1819 — San Telmo wrecks in the Drake Passage off Livingston Island
1819–1821 — Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen and Mikhail Lazarev, Admirals of Russian Imperial Navy, during Russian circumnavigation expedition, on 27 January 1820, discovers an ice shelf at Princess Martha Coast that later became known as the Fimbul Ice Shelf (69°21′28″S 2°14′50″W). Bellingshausen and Lazarev became the first explorers to see and officially discover the land of Antarctica.
1820 — Edward Bransfield with William Smith as his pilot – on 30 January 1820, sight Trinity Peninsula (63°37′S 058°20′W).
1820 — Nathaniel Palmer sights Antarctica on 17 November 1820
1821 — George Powell, a British sealer, and Nathaniel B. Palmer, an American sealer, discover the South Orkney Islands. Powell annexes them for the British.
1821 — John Davis – on 7 February 1821 disputed claim of setting foot on Antarctica at Hughes Bay (64°13′S 61°20′W)
1823–1824 — James Weddell discovers the Weddell Sea; – on 20 February 1823 his ship Jane (160 tons) reached a new Farthest South of 74° 15′ S (74°15′S 30°12′W)
1830–1833 — Southern Ocean Expedition led by John Biscoe, an English sealer; circumnavigates the continent, sets foot on Anvers Island, names and annexes Graham Land, discovers Biscoe Islands, Queen Adelaide Island (67.25°S 68.5°W) and sights Enderby Land (67°30′S 53°0′E)
1837–1840 — Second French Antarctic Expedition – led by Jules Dumont d'Urville; discovers Adelie Land and sets foot on an islet of Geologie Archipelago (66°36′19″S 140°4′0″E) 4 km from the mainland to take mineral and animal samples (66° S)
1838–1839 — John Balleny discovers Balleny Islands (66°55′S 163°45′E)
1838–1842 — United States Exploring Expedition – led by Charles Wilkes to Antarctic Peninsula (69°30′S 065°00′W) and eastern Antarctica; discovers "Termination Barrier" ("Shackleton Ice Shelf")
1839–1843 — James Clark Ross's expedition of 1839 to 1843 discovered the Ross Ice Shelf, Ross Sea, Mount Erebus, Mount Terror and Victoria Land; extended his Farthest South to 78° 10′ S on 23 January 1842
1851–1853 — Mercator Cooper landed on what is now known as Oates Coast in what is probably the first adequately-documented landing on the mainland of Antarctica.
1872–1876 — HMS Challenger under Capt. George S. Nares, becomes the first steamship to cross the Antarctic Circle; reopens the study of oceanography in the region after a 30-year gap.[5]
1892–1893 — Carl Anton Larsen led the first Norwegian expedition to Antarctica aboard the ship Jason. Larsen became the first person to ski in Antarctica where the Larsen Ice Shelf was named after him.
1892–1893 — Dundee Whaling Expedition discover Dundee Island (63°30′S 055°55′W)
1893–1894 — Carl Anton Larsen led the second Norwegian expedition to Antarctica
1893–1895 — Henryk Bull, Carstens Borchgrevink and Alexander von Tunzelmann – set foot on Antarctica at Cape Adare
1897–1899 — Belgian Antarctic Expedition – led by Adrien de Gerlache; first to winter in Antarctica
1898–1900 — Southern Cross Expedition, Carsten Borchgrevink – sails to Cape Adare, winters on Antarctica and takes Farthest South on 16 February 1900 at 78° 50′ S
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 461742
09-13-2018 12:01 AM

 



Post: #57
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-13-2018 12:00 AM)
HOLY EXPEDITIONS BATMAN!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_An...xpeditions
Here is a partial list for those who do not want to click the link.
Pre-exploration theories

600 BC – 300 BC — Greek Philosophers theorize Spherical Earth with North and South Polar regions.
150 AD — Ptolemy published Geographia, which notes Terra Australis Incognita

Pre-19th century

7th century — Ui-te-Rangiora claimed to have sighted southern ice fields.
13th century — Polynesians settle Auckland Islands (50° S)[1][2][3][4]
1501–1502 — Gonçalo Coelho and Amerigo Vespucci potentially sail to (52° S)
1522 — Ferdinand Magellan – first circumnavigation discovers Strait of Magellan (54° S)
1578 — Francis Drake discovers Drake Passage
1599 — Dirk Gerritsz – potentially sails to (64° S)
1603 — Gabriel de Castilla – potentially sails to (64° S)
1615 — Jacob le Maire and Willem Schouten first to sail around Cape Horn cross (56° S)
1619 — Garcia de Nodal expedition – circumnavigate Tierra del Fuego and discover Diego Ramirez Islands (56°30′S 68°43′W)
1675 — Anthony de la Roché discovers South Georgia (54°15′00″S 36°45′00″W), the first ever land discovered south of the Antarctic Convergence
1698–1699 — Edmond Halley sails to (52° S)
1720 — Captain George Shelvocke – sails to (61° 30′ S)
1739 — Jean-Baptiste Charles Bouvet de Lozier – discovers Bouvet Island (54°26′S 3°24′E)
1771 — James Cook – HM Bark Endeavour expedition
1771–1772 — First French Antarctic Expedition – led by Yves-Joseph de Kerguelen-Trémarec discovers Kerguelen Islands (49°15′S 69°35′E)
1772–1775 — James Cook – sails HMS Resolution crossing Antarctic Circle in January 1773 and December 1773. On 30 January 1774 he reaches 71° 10′ S, his Farthest South, coming within about 75 miles of the Antarctic mainland without seeing it.

19th century

1780s to 1839 — American and British whalers and sealers make incidental discoveries
1819 — William Smith discovers South Shetland Islands (62°00′S 058°00′W), the first land discovered south of 60° south latitude.
1819 — San Telmo wrecks in the Drake Passage off Livingston Island
1819–1821 — Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen and Mikhail Lazarev, Admirals of Russian Imperial Navy, during Russian circumnavigation expedition, on 27 January 1820, discovers an ice shelf at Princess Martha Coast that later became known as the Fimbul Ice Shelf (69°21′28″S 2°14′50″W). Bellingshausen and Lazarev became the first explorers to see and officially discover the land of Antarctica.
1820 — Edward Bransfield with William Smith as his pilot – on 30 January 1820, sight Trinity Peninsula (63°37′S 058°20′W).
1820 — Nathaniel Palmer sights Antarctica on 17 November 1820
1821 — George Powell, a British sealer, and Nathaniel B. Palmer, an American sealer, discover the South Orkney Islands. Powell annexes them for the British.
1821 — John Davis – on 7 February 1821 disputed claim of setting foot on Antarctica at Hughes Bay (64°13′S 61°20′W)
1823–1824 — James Weddell discovers the Weddell Sea; – on 20 February 1823 his ship Jane (160 tons) reached a new Farthest South of 74° 15′ S (74°15′S 30°12′W)
1830–1833 — Southern Ocean Expedition led by John Biscoe, an English sealer; circumnavigates the continent, sets foot on Anvers Island, names and annexes Graham Land, discovers Biscoe Islands, Queen Adelaide Island (67.25°S 68.5°W) and sights Enderby Land (67°30′S 53°0′E)
1837–1840 — Second French Antarctic Expedition – led by Jules Dumont d'Urville; discovers Adelie Land and sets foot on an islet of Geologie Archipelago (66°36′19″S 140°4′0″E) 4 km from the mainland to take mineral and animal samples (66° S)
1838–1839 — John Balleny discovers Balleny Islands (66°55′S 163°45′E)
1838–1842 — United States Exploring Expedition – led by Charles Wilkes to Antarctic Peninsula (69°30′S 065°00′W) and eastern Antarctica; discovers "Termination Barrier" ("Shackleton Ice Shelf")
1839–1843 — James Clark Ross's expedition of 1839 to 1843 discovered the Ross Ice Shelf, Ross Sea, Mount Erebus, Mount Terror and Victoria Land; extended his Farthest South to 78° 10′ S on 23 January 1842
1851–1853 — Mercator Cooper landed on what is now known as Oates Coast in what is probably the first adequately-documented landing on the mainland of Antarctica.
1872–1876 — HMS Challenger under Capt. George S. Nares, becomes the first steamship to cross the Antarctic Circle; reopens the study of oceanography in the region after a 30-year gap.[5]
1892–1893 — Carl Anton Larsen led the first Norwegian expedition to Antarctica aboard the ship Jason. Larsen became the first person to ski in Antarctica where the Larsen Ice Shelf was named after him.
1892–1893 — Dundee Whaling Expedition discover Dundee Island (63°30′S 055°55′W)
1893–1894 — Carl Anton Larsen led the second Norwegian expedition to Antarctica
1893–1895 — Henryk Bull, Carstens Borchgrevink and Alexander von Tunzelmann – set foot on Antarctica at Cape Adare
1897–1899 — Belgian Antarctic Expedition – led by Adrien de Gerlache; first to winter in Antarctica
1898–1900 — Southern Cross Expedition, Carsten Borchgrevink – sails to Cape Adare, winters on Antarctica and takes Farthest South on 16 February 1900 at 78° 50′ S

I will add the flat-erf expeditions as soon as they have one.
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UnAcceptance
Registered User
User ID: 461742
09-13-2018 12:22 AM

Posts: 1,195



Post: #58
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
Here is PART of the 20th century expeditions to a super huge island located at the South Pole on every scientificly proven map around the globe.
20th century
1901–1904 — Discovery Expedition – led by Robert Falcon Scott, on 30 December 1903, reached (82° 17′S)
1901–1903 — Gauss expedition (or First German Antarctic Expedition) – led by Erich von Drygalski
1901–1903 — Swedish Antarctic Expedition – led by Otto Nordenskjöld with captain Carl Anton Larsen
1902–1904 — Scottish National Antarctic Expedition – led by William Speirs Bruce
1903–1905 — Third French Antarctic Expedition – led by Jean-Baptiste Charcot
1907–1909 — Nimrod Expedition – On 9 January 1909, Ernest Shackleton reached 88° 23 ′S (Farthest South), and on 16 January 1909, Professor Edgeworth David reached the South Magnetic Pole at (72°25′S 155°16′E) (mean position)
1908–1910 — Fourth French Antarctic Expedition – led by Jean-Baptiste Charcot
1910–1912 — Japanese Antarctic Expedition – led by Nobu Shirase
1910–1912 — Roald Amundsen's South Pole expedition – On 14 December 1911, reached the South Pole (90° S)
1910–1913 — Terra Nova Expedition – On 17 January 1912, Robert Falcon Scott, reached the South Pole (90° S)
1911–1913 — Second German Antarctic Expedition – led by Wilhelm Filchner
1911–1914 — Australasian Antarctic Expedition – led by Douglas Mawson
1914–1916 — Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition – led by Ernest Shackleton
1914–1917 — Ross Sea Party – led by Aeneas Mackintosh
1920–1922 — British Graham Land Expedition - a British expedition to Graham Land led by John Lachlan Cope
1921–1922 — Shackleton-Rowett Expedition – led by Ernest Shackleton – the last expedition of the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration
1929–1931 — British Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) – led by Douglas Mawson
1928–1930 — Richard Evelyn Byrd – First expedition
1931 — H. Halvorsen – discovered Princess Astrid Coast
1931 — Hjalmar Riiser-Larsen – flew over Antarctica, discovered Kronprins Olav Kyst
1933–1935 — Richard Evelyn Byrd – Second expedition
1933–1939 — Lincoln Ellsworth – Aircraft expedition
1934–1937 — British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) – led by John Riddoch Rymill
1936 — Lars Christensen – dropped Norwegian flag over Prince Harald Coast
1938 — Third German Antarctic Expedition (New Swabia, or Neuschwabenland, claimed for Nazi Germany) – led by Capt. Alfred Ritscher
1939–1941 — United States Antarctic Service Expedition – led by Richard Evelyn Byrd (Byrd's third expedition)
1943–1945 — Operation Tabarin – led by Lieutenant James Marr
1946–1947 — Operation Highjump – led by Richard Evelyn Byrd (Byrd's fourth expedition)
1947 — First Chilean Antarctic Expedition
1947–1948 — Operation Windmill – led by Commander Gerald Ketchum
1947–1948 — Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition – led by Finn Ronne
1949–1950 — Adelie-Land, Ship Commandant Charcot – led by Michel Barre
1949–1952 — Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition – led by John Giaever
1954 — Mawson Station established
1955–1956 — Operation Deep Freeze – led by Richard Evelyn Byrd (Byrd's fifth expedition)
1955–1957 — Falkland Island Dependency Aerial Survey led by P G Mott
1955–1957 — 1st Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Mikhail Somov
1956 Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station established
1956–1958 — Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition – led by Vivian Fuchs
1956–1958 — 2nd Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Aleksei Treshnikov
1957–1958 — International Geophysical Year
1957–1958 — New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition
1957 — Scott Base established
1957–1958 — Luncke Expedition
1957–1959 — 3rd Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Yevgeny Tolstikov
1958–1959 — New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition
1958–1960 — 4th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Aleksandr Dralkin
1959–1961 — 5th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Yevgeny Korotkevich
1960 — South African National Antarctic Expedition
1960–1962 — 6th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by V.Driatsky
1961–1963 — 7th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Aleksandr Dralkin
1962–1962 — Vostok traverse – led by Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE)
1962–1964 — 8th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Mikhail Somov
1963–1965 — 9th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Mikhail Somov and Pavel Senko
1964-1965 — South Pole—Queen Maud Land Traverse I
1964–1966 — 10th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by M.Ostrekin, I.Petrov
1965-1966 — South Pole—Queen Maud Land Traverse II
1965–1967 — 11th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by D.Maksutov, Leonid Dubrovin
1965–1965 — Operación 90 - Terrestrial Argentine Expedition to the South Pole Led by Coronel D. Jorge Leal.
1966–1968 — 12th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Pavel Senko and Vladislav Gerbovich
1966–1967 — New Zealand Antarctic Research Programme Mariner Glacier Northern Party Expedition — led by John E S Lawrence
1967–1968 — South Pole—Queen Maud Land Traverse III
1967–1969 — 13th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Aleksei Treshnikov
1968–1970 — 14th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by D.Maksutov, Ernst Krenkel
1969–1970 — New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition
1969–1971 — 15th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Pavel Senko and Vladislav Gerbovich
1970–1972 — 16th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by I.Petrov and Yury Tarbeyev
1971–1973 — 17th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Yevgeny Korotkevich, V. Averyanov
1972–1974 — 18th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Pavel Senko
1973–1975 — 19th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by D.Maksutov, V. Ignatov
1974–1976 — 20th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by V.Serdyukov, N. Kornilov
1975–1977 — 21st Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by O.Sedov, G. Bardin
1976–1978 — 22nd Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by N.Tyabin, Leonid Dubrovin
1977–1979 — 23rd Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by V.Serdyukov, O. Sedov
1978–1980 — 24th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by A.Artemyev, O. Sedov
1979 — Air New Zealand Flight 901 – airplane crash
1979–1980 — 25th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by N.Kornilov, N. Tyabin
1980–1981 — Transglobe Expedition – led by Ranulph Fiennes
1980–1982 — 26th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by V.Serdyukov, V. Shamontyev
1981–1983 — 27th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by D.Maksutov, R. Galkin
1981-1982 — First Indian Expedition to Antarctica - led by Dr. Sayed Zahoor Qasim
1982 — Falkland Islands War
1982–1983 — First Brazilian Expedition to Antarctica -
1982–1983 — Second Indian Expedition to Antarctica - led by V. K. Raina
1982–1984 — 28th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by N.Kornilov, A. Artemyev
1983–1985 — 29th Soviet Antarctic Expedition – led by N.Tyabin, L. Bulatov
1983–1985 — Third Indian Expedition to Antarctica
1984–1987 — In the Footsteps of Scott – led by Robert Swan
1984–1985 — 1st Uruguayan Antarctic Expedition - Antarkos I Led by Lt. Col. Omar Porciúncula
1984–1986 — 30th Soviet Antarctic Expedition – led by D.Maksutov, R. Galkin
1985–1987 — 31st Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by N. Tyabin, V. Dubovtsev
1986–1988 — 32nd Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by V.Klokov, V.Vovk
1987 — Iceberg B-9 calves and carries away Little Americas I – III
1987–1989 — 33rd Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by N.A.Kornilov, Yu.A.Khabarov
1987–1988 — First Bulgarian Antarctic Expedition — St. Kliment Ohridski Base established
1988–1990 — 34th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by S.M.Pryamikov, L.V.Bulatov
1989–1990 — Antarctic crossing on foot by Reinhold Messner and Arved Fuchs.[citation needed]
1989–1990 — 1990 International Trans-Antarctica Expedition — led by American Will Steger and Frenchman Jean-Louis Étienne, first un-mechanized crossing
1989–1991 — 35th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by V.M.Piguzov
1990 — 1st North Korean Antarctic Expedition[6]
1990–1991 — 2nd North Korean Antarctic Expedition[6]
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UnAcceptance
Registered User
User ID: 461742
09-13-2018 12:31 AM

Posts: 1,195



Post: #59
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
1991–1992 — 36th Soviet Antarctic Expedition — led by Lev Savatyugin
1992–1993 - American Women's Antarctic Expedition- AWE. First team of Women to ski to the South Pole: Ann Bancroft, Sunniva Sorby,Anne DalVera, Sue Giller- 67 days
1992–1993 — British Polar Plod — led by Ranulph Fiennes with Mike Stroud (physician), first unassisted expedition crossing the continent by ski, (2,173 km in 95 days)
1992–1993 — Erling Kagge, first unassisted, and first solo expedition to the South Pole by ski, (1,310 km in 53 days)
1992–1993 — Antarctic Environmental Research Expedition — led by Kenji Yoshikawa
1994 — Liv Arnesen, first unassisted woman to the South Pole by ski, (1,200 km in 50 days)
1994 - Cato Zahl Pedersen (Norway) becomes the first person with no arms to ski to the South Pole (1400 km from Berkner Island), together with Lars Ebbesen and Odd Harald Hauge
1995 — “A Pole at the Poles” – Marek Kamiński solo expedition to the South Pole from Berkner Island (1,400 km in 53 days);
1995-1996 - Bernard Voyer and Thierry Pétry unassisted expedition to the South Pole by ski
1996 — Lake Vostok discovered
1996/97 — “Solo TransAntarctica” – Marek Kamiński attempted solo crossing of Antarctica (1,450 km);

21st century

2000-2001- Norwegian Liv Arnesen and the American Ann Bancroft crossed Antarctica on ski-sail from Blue 1 Runaway November 13th reaching after 94 days of expedition McMurdo, passing through the South Pole. [7]
2001/2 - First and longest sea kayak expedition by New Zealanders Graham Charles, Marcus Waters and Mark Jones paddle unsupported from Hope Bay to Adelaide Island in 35 days.
2004 — Scot100 First ever Scottish Expedition to South Pole [8] began in October 2004 - a century after a historic expedition led by William Speirs Bruce, Edinburgh's "unknown" explorer, who Craig Mathieson views as "truly the greatest polar explorer of all time".
2004 — Together to the Pole - a Polish four-man expedition led by Marek Kamiński, with Jan Mela (a teenage double amputee, who in the same year reached also the North Pole)
2004–2005 — Chilean South Pole Expedition.
2004–2005 — Tangra 2004/05 created Camp Academia.
2005 — Ice Challenger Expedition travelled to the South Pole in a six-wheeled vehicle.[9]
2005–2006 — Spanish Trans-Antarctic Expedition, led by Ramon Larramendi, reached the Southern Pole of Inaccessibility using kite-sleds.[10]
2006 Hannah McKeand sets coast-to-pole solo/unsupported record of 39 days, 9 hours and 33 minutes[11]
2006-2007 — Jenny and Ray Jardine 57-day ski trek to South Pole [12]
2007 — Pat Falvey leads an Irish team to reach the South Pole, skiing 1140 km only weeks after completing an unsupported Ski traverse of the Greenland Ice Cap in August 2007 in honour of Irish Polar Explorers such as Shakelton and Tom Crean. Clare O'Leary becomes the first Irish female to reach the South Pole.
2007–2008 — Norwegian-U.S. Scientific Traverse of East Antarctica.[13]
2007–2008 — British Army Antarctic Expedition 2007–2008 [14]
2008 — Todd Carmichael sets coast-to-pole solo/unsupported record of 39 days, 7 hours and 49 minutes[15]
2008 — First Venezuelan Scientific Expedition to Antarctica.
2008–2009 — Impossible 2 Possible (i2P) unsupported South Pole quest by Ray Zahab, Kevin Vallely and Richard Weber.[16]
2009 — Azerbaijan Scientific Expedition
2009 — Kaspersky Commonwealth Antarctic Expedition, largest and most international group of women to ski to South Pole.
2009 — Second Venezuelan Scientific Expedition to Antarctica.
2009−2010 — Unsupported/Unassisted Antarctica Ski Traverse from Berkner Island to South Pole to Ross Sea by Cecilie Skog and Ryan Waters.
2010 — Moon Regan Transantarctic Crossing, first wheeled transantarctic crossing and first bio-fuelled vehicle to travel to the South Pole.[17]
2010 — Third Venezuelan Scientific Expedition to Antarctica.
2011 — Fourth Venezuelan Scientific Expedition to Antarctica.
2011−2012 — From Novolazarevskaya to Pole of Inaccessibility to South Pole to Hercules inlet by Sebastian Copeland and Eric McNair Landry by kites and skis.[18]
2011−2012 — British Services Antarctic Expedition 2012[19]
2011-2012 – Expedition by Ramon Hernando de Larramendi, by Inuit WindSled.[20]
2012 — Felicity Aston becomes the first person to ski alone across Antarctica using only personal muscle power, as well as the first woman to cross Antarctica alone.[21][22] Her journey began on 25 November 2011, at the Leverett Glacier, and continued for 59 days and a distance of 1,084 miles (1,744 kilometers).[23]
2012 — Fifth Venezuelan Scientific Expedition to Antarctica.
2012−2013 — Aaron Linsdau becomes the second American to ski solo from the Hercules Inlet to the South Pole. His original plan was to make a round trip but through a series of problems, like all other expeditions this year, was unable to make the return journey.[24]
2012 — Eric Larsen attempts a bicycle ride from coast to South Pole. Completes a quarter of the distance.
2012 — Grant Korgan becomes the first person with a spinal cord injury to literally "push" himself to the geographic South Pole![25][26][27][28][29]
2012−2013 — Shackleton's centenary re-enactment expedition of the journey of the James Caird aboard the replica Alexandra Shackleton. Six British and Australian Explorers completed the "double journey" on 10 February 2013 after the 800-mile journey from Elephant Island to South Georgia and the mountain crossing.[30]
2013 — Sixth Venezuelan Scientific Expedition to Antarctica.
2013–2014 — Ben Saunders and Tarka L'Herpiniere make the first ever completion of the Terra Nova Expedition first taken by Robert Falcon Scott in January 1912. Their 1,801-mile, 105-day return journey to the South Pole is the longest ever polar journey on foot.[31]
2013 — Parker Liautaud and Douglas Stoup attempt in December 2013 the Willis Resilience Expedition [32] to set a "coast to Pole" speed record [33] by reaching the geographical South Pole on skis in the fastest miles per hour ever recorded from an interior of continent start while being followed by a support vehicle.
2013 — Antony Jinman will walk to the South Pole solo for the 2013 ETE Teachers South Pole Mission, during which he will be in daily contact with schoolchildren from across the United Kingdom and will make films using the world's first drone flights at the South Pole.
2013 — Maria Leijerstam completes the first tricycle ride from coast to South Pole.
2013−14 — Lewis Clarke (aged 16 years and 61 days) guided by Carl Alvey (aged 30) became the youngest person to trek from the Antarctic coast at Hercules Inlet to the South Pole. His expedition was in support of the Prince's Trust and his achievement is recognised by Guinness World Records.
2013-14 — Married couple Christine (Chris) Fagan and Marty Fagan became the first American married couple (and second married couple in history) to complete a full unguided, unsupported, unassisted ski from the Antarctic coast to the South Pole. They join just over 100 people in history who have traveled to the South Pole in this manner. Their expedition took 48 days. Their achievement is recognized by Guinness World Records. Learn more at http://www.3belowzero.com and http://www.christinefagan.com. A book about the expedition is forthcoming.
2013−14 — Daniel P. Burton completes the first bicycle ride from coast to the South Pole.
2013−14 — Chris Turney led an expedition, entitled "Spirit of Mawson", aimed at highlighting the decline in sea ice due to climate change. The expedition was abandoned when its Russian ship became stuck in unusually large amounts of sea ice.
2013 — In December 2013 the Expeditions 7 Team led by Scott Brady made a successful east-to-west crossing in four-wheel drive vehicles from Novolazarevskaya to the Ross Ice Shelf via the Scott-Amundsen South Pole Station. Expeditions 7’s logistic plan included providing assistance to the Walking With The Wounded expedition, which was required at latitude 88°S. From the Ross Ice Shelf the Expeditions 7 team returned to Novolazarevskaya via the same route.
2015−16 — Henry Worsley died while attempting to complete the first solo and unaided crossing of the Antarctic.[34]
2016−17 — Spear17, a six-man team from the British Army Reserves successfully completed a full traverse of Antarctica. They set off on 16 November from Hercules Inlet, arrived at the South Pole on Christmas Day, and completed a full traverse reaching Ross Ice Shelf on 20 January 2017. The aim of the expedition was to raise the profile of the army reservists, and to honour the memory of fellow explorer Henry Worsley. The team was led by Capt Lou Rudd MBE [35]
2016−17 — February 7 Mike Horn completes first ever solo, unsupported north-to-south traverse of Antarctica from the Princess Astrid Coast (lat -70.1015 lon 9.8249) to the Dumont D'urville Station (lat -66.6833 lon 139.9167) via the South Pole. He arrived at the pole on February 7, 2017. A total distance of 5100 km was covered utilizing kites and skis in 57 days.[36]
2017-2018 - Astrid Forhold (Norway), supported by Jan Sverre Sivertsen, becomes the woman to have skied the longest part of the original Roald Amundsen route from Bay of Whales to the South Pole
These are events. Real people. Factual documentation.
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UnAcceptance
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User ID: 461742
09-13-2018 01:10 AM

Posts: 1,195



Post: #60
RE: THE NEW ANTARCTICA. FULL DISCLOSURE
LoP Guest  Wrote: (09-09-2018 08:12 AM)
UnAcceptance  Wrote: (09-09-2018 04:54 AM)
It does not circle the planet as some may have thought.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technolog...smsnnews11
The NY Times chimes in.........oh my!
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/07/scien...rema.html/
Dailymail has something to say too.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/a...-made.html
...and for the wealthy, something from Fortune
http://fortune.com/2018/09/08/antarctica-map/
All of these not NASA places must be in cahoots in keeping the biggest secret of ALL TIME, that the Erf is Flat.
Because if even ONE is right.......
The last time even 144,000 people tried to keep a secret, the truth came out.

All the links posted are 100% correct.
Still no wall to be seen.

Lmonkey All links from MAINSTREAM MEDIA outlets who have yet to tell us the truth on ANY matter.

Then I challenge you to post your credible sources.
All of mine have resource material and verification.
You have a laughing monkey.
I have centuries of exploration information.
You have a laughing monkey.
I have and share a scientific method.
You have a laughing monkey. Bump
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