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Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
ABCDEF_Jesus
Dominios Pizza
User ID: 425858
10-11-2018 06:23 PM

Posts: 1,631



Post: #31
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
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[ ]Mo moony mo problems[/size]
[Image: Fourier_series_square_wave_circles_animation.gif]
Don't blame the moonys though.. They are just stupid particles detecting reflected waves.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 198245
10-11-2018 06:50 PM

 



Post: #32
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
they should call them satellatellites.

then the satellatellites can have satellatellatellites.
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LoP Guest
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User ID: 467240
10-11-2018 06:53 PM

 



Post: #33
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
what if the moons moon has a moon?

do you call it a moonsmoonsmoon?
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Skip.
lop guest
User ID: 457954
10-11-2018 07:07 PM

 



Post: #34
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
The word "Mom" comes from "Mon" which is where "Moon" comes from. The moon is the mother goddess. In the lunar calendar, each month (moonth) was based on the moon's cycle. Mother Mary represents the Moon and her son represents the Sun.

Mom-Moon
Son-Sun
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Bicnarok
Resistance is futile
User ID: 467396
10-11-2018 07:23 PM

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Post: #35
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
and the moons, moons, moon is called weenmoon.

[Image: 1Wlteoi.gif?1]
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Bicnarok
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User ID: 467396
10-11-2018 07:26 PM

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Post: #36
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
ABCDEF_Jesus  Wrote: (10-11-2018 06:23 PM)
[ ]Mo moony mo problems[/size]
[Image: Fourier_series_square_wave_circles_animation.gif]
Don't blame the moonys though.. They are just stupid particles detecting reflected waves.

that's a cool animation, how about explaining it.

[Image: 1Wlteoi.gif?1]
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lop guest
User ID: 457954
10-11-2018 07:27 PM

 



Post: #37
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Bicnarok  Wrote: (10-11-2018 07:26 PM)
ABCDEF_Jesus  Wrote: (10-11-2018 06:23 PM)
[ ]Mo moony mo problems[/size]
link to image: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c...mation.gif
Don't blame the moonys though.. They are just stupid particles detecting reflected waves.

that's a cool animation, how about explaining it.

Math.
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Bicnarok
Resistance is futile
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10-11-2018 07:34 PM

Posts: 752



Post: #38
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Skip.  Wrote: (10-11-2018 07:27 PM)
Bicnarok  Wrote: (10-11-2018 07:26 PM)
that's a cool animation, how about explaining it.

Math.

you obviously don't know giving such a vague response

[Image: 1Wlteoi.gif?1]
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lop guest
User ID: 457954
10-11-2018 07:36 PM

 



Post: #39
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Bicnarok  Wrote: (10-11-2018 07:34 PM)
Skip.  Wrote: (10-11-2018 07:27 PM)
Math.

you obviously don't know giving such a vague response

But I'm not wrong.... chuckle
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Sing-I'llSway
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User ID: 418032
10-11-2018 08:01 PM

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Post: #40
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Fork  Wrote: (10-11-2018 04:01 PM)
Yes, submoons are for real.

Have you ever gazed up at the night sky, looked up at the moon and wondered if it could have a moon of its own?

While you probably haven’t, a curious four-year-old did back in 2015 and on Tuesday, his astronomer mom and one of her colleague’s published a paper that essentially says: Yes, a moon can have its own moon.

The Carnegie Institution of Washington’s Juna Kollmeier AKA ‘The Junaverse’ told HuffPost that while none of the planets’ moons in our solar system currently have moons (that we know of), “Earth’s moon, one of Jupiter’s moons and two of Saturn’s moons” may all have once had moons.

But the real question is: what do you call a moon’s moon?

While Kollmeier and astronomer Sean Raymond referred to them as ‘submoons’ in their paper, the New Scientist has dubbed them ‘moonmoons.’

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/moo...d7ddef6126

Yup. The universe is a strange place. A never ending source of fascination. I was just reading yesterday how Ganymede, Jupiter's biggest moon (the biggest moon in the solar system, at that), is actually bigger than Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun.

Weird sh*t like that is always great to ponder...

I love astronomy. :)

"(He) originated the concept 'enemy of the people.' This term automatically made it unnecessary that the ideological errors of a man or men engaged in a controversy be proven. It made possible the use of the cruelest repression.”
-Nikita Kruschev, denouncing 20th-century tyrant, Joseph Stalin
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singing wilbury spider
Kraut! und Rüben!
User ID: 467371
10-11-2018 08:23 PM

Posts: 5,433



Post: #41
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Sing-IllSway  Wrote: (10-11-2018 08:01 PM)
Fork  Wrote: (10-11-2018 04:01 PM)
Yes, submoons are for real.

Have you ever gazed up at the night sky, looked up at the moon and wondered if it could have a moon of its own?

While you probably haven’t, a curious four-year-old did back in 2015 and on Tuesday, his astronomer mom and one of her colleague’s published a paper that essentially says: Yes, a moon can have its own moon.

The Carnegie Institution of Washington’s Juna Kollmeier AKA ‘The Junaverse’ told HuffPost that while none of the planets’ moons in our solar system currently have moons (that we know of), “Earth’s moon, one of Jupiter’s moons and two of Saturn’s moons” may all have once had moons.

But the real question is: what do you call a moon’s moon?

While Kollmeier and astronomer Sean Raymond referred to them as ‘submoons’ in their paper, the New Scientist has dubbed them ‘moonmoons.’

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/moo...d7ddef6126

Yup. The universe is a strange place. A never ending source of fascination. I was just reading yesterday how Ganymede, Jupiter's biggest moon (the biggest moon in the solar system, at that), is actually bigger than Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun.

Weird sh*t like that is always great to ponder...

I love astronomy. :)

Ganymede also has an iron core, a magnetic field, lots of water and a thin oxygen atmosphere

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpkQEq75y18

[Image: G2FRDqb.gif]

arachnophobes beware!
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Sing-I'llSway
Equal Opportunity Skeptic
User ID: 418032
10-11-2018 08:25 PM

Posts: 2,264



Post: #42
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
LoP Guest  Wrote: (10-11-2018 06:17 PM)
Where oh where are our moons moon-moons? All those craters and yet nothing got caught in it's orbit over the centuries?

You actually bring up an interesting notion, here. My layman's guess:

First, our moon isn't terribly massive. It's pretty small. I'm guessing (I haven't read the article Fork linked to yet) the moons with moons are likely very BIG moons. Hence, massive enough to "catch" objects in its orbit.

Second, there's a reason planets don't usually (usually) fare well in binary star systems, and it has to do with the orbital mechanics of the 2 massive bodies (stars). Planets are likely to be kicked out of such systems. Our moon and Earth form a similar binary system, and so I'm guessing if the moon ever "captured" anything it wouldn't be long before it got "kicked out" via the gravitational interactions between it and Earth.

Third, I'm guessing (again, I haven't read this article yet) most moons that are orbiting moons have been "captured" during flybys, as opposed to having been created as the result of a massive impact (though I suppose it's possible?). Given how small our moon is I'm guessing only a much larger body could survive such an impact before being completely obliterated itself.

Fourth, if you look at the craters on the moon's surface most aren't that big. I'm guessing for a moon to be "created" a MASSIVE impact must take place. The majority of the craters on the moon clearly displaced fair amounts of ejecta, but seemingly not enough to re-form in orbit as a bonafide "moon".


These are the guesses of an astronomy-nerd without any formal astronomical training.

"(He) originated the concept 'enemy of the people.' This term automatically made it unnecessary that the ideological errors of a man or men engaged in a controversy be proven. It made possible the use of the cruelest repression.”
-Nikita Kruschev, denouncing 20th-century tyrant, Joseph Stalin
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Bicnarok
Resistance is futile
User ID: 467396
10-11-2018 08:26 PM

Posts: 752



Post: #43
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Skip.  Wrote: (10-11-2018 07:36 PM)
Bicnarok  Wrote: (10-11-2018 07:34 PM)
you obviously don't know giving such a vague response

But I'm not wrong.... chuckle

it's "maths" in proper English, so you are. Lmao

[Image: 1Wlteoi.gif?1]
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Sing-I'llSway
Equal Opportunity Skeptic
User ID: 418032
10-11-2018 08:31 PM

Posts: 2,264



Post: #44
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
singing wilbury spider  Wrote: (10-11-2018 08:23 PM)
Sing-IllSway  Wrote: (10-11-2018 08:01 PM)
Yup. The universe is a strange place. A never ending source of fascination. I was just reading yesterday how Ganymede, Jupiter's biggest moon (the biggest moon in the solar system, at that), is actually bigger than Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun.

Weird sh*t like that is always great to ponder...

I love astronomy. :)

Ganymede also has an iron core, a magnetic field, lots of water and a thin oxygen atmosphere

Indeed. All the Galilean Moons are pretty fascinating.

Another fun fact about Ganymede/Mercury: even though, as you point out here, Ganymede has an iron core and is MUCH larger than Mercury, Mercury is still MUCH more dense than Ganymede because its own iron core consists of nearly the whole planet.

Mercury is so interesting because it's likely the remnant core of what was once a much bigger planet. The theory goes that it was smacked by another large planet early in the solar system's history, and that collision basically blew off/vaporized the outer layers of Mercury.

What's left is a tiny planet with a ridiculously massive iron core.

Astronomy's great.

"(He) originated the concept 'enemy of the people.' This term automatically made it unnecessary that the ideological errors of a man or men engaged in a controversy be proven. It made possible the use of the cruelest repression.”
-Nikita Kruschev, denouncing 20th-century tyrant, Joseph Stalin
Quote this message in a reply
Sing-I'llSway
Equal Opportunity Skeptic
User ID: 418032
10-11-2018 08:40 PM

Posts: 2,264



Post: #45
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Bicnarok  Wrote: (10-11-2018 07:26 PM)
ABCDEF_Jesus  Wrote: (10-11-2018 06:23 PM)
[ ]Mo moony mo problems[/size]
[Image: Fourier_series_square_wave_circles_animation.gif]
Don't blame the moonys though.. They are just stupid particles detecting reflected waves.

that's a cool animation, how about explaining it.

I believe it has to do with orbital resonance.



Yesterday when I was reading about Ganymede I saw this similar display on wikipedia:

[Image: nExvDPY.gif]


In effect, my animation is showing how, for instance, Io orbits Jupiter 4 times for each time Ganymede orbits Jupiter once.

The animation ABCDEF put up I believe is displaying the same concept, just a bit more complicated because it includes little moons orbiting moons forming a more complex resonance.

The fact that it's not labeled (except for complicated math) is what makes it seem more complicated than it actually is.

"(He) originated the concept 'enemy of the people.' This term automatically made it unnecessary that the ideological errors of a man or men engaged in a controversy be proven. It made possible the use of the cruelest repression.”
-Nikita Kruschev, denouncing 20th-century tyrant, Joseph Stalin
(This post was last modified: 10-11-2018 10:18 PM by Sing-I'llSway.) Quote this message in a reply
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