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Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 387592
10-11-2018 08:50 PM

 



Post: #46
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
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Kim K's ass has its own asses too!
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Fork
fork in the road
User ID: 467410
10-11-2018 09:40 PM

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Post: #47
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Lots of good stuff added.
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[email protected]
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10-11-2018 09:51 PM

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Post: #48
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
[ ]Can moons have moons? Yes, and they're called 'moonmoons'! Earth, Saturn and Jupiter's natural satellites may have objects the size of SKYSCRAPERS in orbit around them[/size]

Earth's moon may be orbited by a mysterious smaller moon that has alluded scientists for decades, according to a new study.

This submoon, also known as a moonmoon, could be as large as a skyscraper but has yet to be spotted by astronomers.

It is one of at least four moonmoons that may exist in our solar system, according to new calculations.

Earth's moon, Jupiter's moon Callisto, and Saturn's moons Titan and Iapetus all have the perfect conditions to host one - if they exist in our star system at all.

[Image: 4962736-6266071-Earth_s_moon_may_be_orbi...184388.jpg]
Earth's moon (file photo) may be orbited by a mysterious smaller moon that has alluded scientists for decades, according to a new study. This submoon, also known as a moonmoon, could be as large as a skyscraper but has yet to be spotted by astronomers

Scientists at Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington and the University of Bordeaux team up for the new study.

Following decades of speculation, the team's calculations revealed for the first time the conditions required for a moonmoon to form.

Computer models showed such an object could only exist around large moons that are relatively distant from their parent planets.

A moonmoon would have to orbit within a very fine distance margin, researchers found.

It would need to orbit close enough to remain within the gravitational pull of its moon rather than the larger planet - but far away enough to avoid being torn apart or pulled out of orbit by its moon.

Meeting these stringent requirements would be difficult, but not impossible, according to the calculations.

[Image: 4962742-6266071-image-a-88_1539276696667.jpg]
A moonmoon would have to orbit within a very fine distance margin to avoid being pulled away by the larger planet. Jupiter's moon Callisto (top left), and Saturn's moons (top right) Titan and Iapetus all have the perfect conditions to host one. Uranus and Neptune do not

Four moons in the solar system could host a mini-satellite, including Earth's moon, Jupiter's moon Callisto, and Saturn's moons Titan and Iapetus.

Even if these moons have the right conditions to host a moonmoon, it remains extremely unlikely that one has landed in the right spot.

'Something has to kick a rock into orbit at the right speed that it would go into orbit around a moon, and not the planet or the star,' study coauthor Dr Sean Raymond, of the University of Bordeaux, told New Scientist.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/218...moonmoons/

If that moon shifted its position during the course of its evolution, as Earth's moon has, its unlikely that the moonmoon would have remained in its orbit, he said.

This may explain why a moonmoon has yet to be spotted in our solar system, experts said.

'I think we can say for sure that there's not a moonmoon that's kilometres across around Jupiter or Saturn,' Queen's University Belfast astronomer Michele Bannister, who was not involved in the study, told New Scientist.

'A moonmoon down to the size of a skyscraper could exist out there, but I'd call it moonmoonlet.'

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/...moons.html

Politics only interests me from a psychological view point.
Other than that, I couldn't careless about it.

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10-11-2018 09:53 PM

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Post: #49
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
[ ]Unusual interactions between Pluto's moons[/size]

[Image: plutosmoonss.jpg]
This composite image from the Hubble Space Telescope shows Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, at the center. Pluto's four smaller moons orbit this 'binary planet' and can be seen to the right and left. The smaller moons must be imaged with 1000 times longer exposure times because they are far dimmer than Pluto and Charon. Credit: NASA/M. Showalter

Much ink has been spilled over Pluto's reclassification as a dwarf planet. And yet, such discussions have not diminished scientific interest in Earth's most distant cousin. A new study is the first to reveal fascinating details about the orbital and rotational patterns of Pluto and its five known moons.

The study, published in the June 4 issue of the journal Nature, describes a system dominated by Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, which together form a 'binary planet." Four smaller moons —Styx, Nix, Kerberos and Hydra—orbit this pair. The paper reports the techniques used to discover the two smallest moons, Kerberos and Styx, and also provides a detailed description of the strange and unpredictable rotational states of the two slightly larger moons, Nix and Hydra.

Later this summer, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft will pass by Pluto and its five known moons, providing the most detailed look at this planetary system to date. Kerberos and Styx were discovered in 2011 and 2012, respectively, while Nix and Hydra were first discovered in 2005.

"Like good children, our moon and most others keep one face focused attentively on their parent planet," said Douglas Hamilton, professor of astronomy at the University of Maryland and a co-author of the Nature study. "What we've learned is that Pluto's moons are more like ornery teenagers who refuse to follow the rules."

The imbalanced and dynamically shifting gravitational field created by Pluto and Charon sends the smaller moons tumbling in unpredictable ways. The effect is amplified by the fact that the moons are roughly football shaped, rather than rounded spheres. The findings are the result of a comprehensive analysis of Hubble Space Telescope data regarding the orbits and properties of the four smaller moons.

[Image: 1-plutosmoonss.jpg]
Pluto and its five moons from a perspective looking away from the sun. Approaching the system, the outermost moon is Hydra, seen in the bottom left corner. The other moons are scaled to the sizes they would appear from this perspective. Credit: NASA/M. Showalter

In contrast to these seemingly random rotational motions, the moons follow a surprisingly predictable pattern as they orbit the binary planet formed by Pluto and Charon. Three of them—Nix, Styx and Hydra—are locked together in resonance, meaning that their orbits follow a clockwork pattern of regularity. The same effect can be seen in three of Jupiter's large moons.

"The resonant relationship between Nix, Styx and Hydra makes their orbits more regular and predictable, which prevents them from crashing into one another," Hamilton said. "This is one reason why tiny Pluto is able to have so many moons."

The study also revealed that Kerberos is as dark as charcoal, while the other moons are as bright as white sand. "This is a very provocative result," said lead author Mark Showalter, a senior research scientist at the SETI Institute. Astronomers had predicted that dust created by meteorite impacts should coat all the moons evenly, giving their surfaces a uniform look.

[Image: unusualinter.jpg]
This set of illustrations of Pluto’s moon Nix shows how the orientation of the moon changes unpredictably as it orbits the Pluto-Charon system. This illustration is based on a computer simulation which calculated the chaotic movement of the four smaller moons in the Pluto-Charon system. Astronomers used this simulation to try and understand the unpredictable changes in reflected light from Nix as it orbits Pluto-Charon. They also found that Pluto’s moon Hydra undergoes a chaotic spin as well. The football-shape of both moons contributes to their wild motion. Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Showalter (SETI Inst.), G. Bacon (STScI)

"Prior to the Hubble observations, nobody appreciated the intricate dynamics of the Pluto system," Showalter said. The New Horizons flyby in July may help solve the mystery of Kerberos' dark surface, and will refine scientists' understanding of the odd rotational and orbital patterns uncovered by Hubble. The New Horizons team is using Showalter and Hamilton's discoveries to help guide science planning efforts.

Among other expected insights, a more detailed study of the chaotic Pluto-Charon system could reveal how planets orbiting a distant binary star might behave. Although many exoplanets have been found to orbit binary stars, these star systems are too far away to figure out their rotational patterns using existing technology.

"We are learning that chaos may be a common trait of binary systems," Hamilton said. "It might even have consequences for life on planets orbiting binary stars."

https://phys.org/news/2015-06-unusual-in...moons.html

Politics only interests me from a psychological view point.
Other than that, I couldn't careless about it.

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10-11-2018 09:55 PM

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Post: #50
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons




Nehcakpi S278

Politics only interests me from a psychological view point.
Other than that, I couldn't careless about it.

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big Dorito
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User ID: 467437
10-11-2018 10:52 PM

 



Post: #51
heart RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Moonmoons !

chuckle
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Mr ifnoc nli
lop guest
User ID: 467432
10-11-2018 11:02 PM

 



Post: #52
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Proof that these scientists are idiots. Lay with in the lack of imagination used for naming new discoveries. I mean really? Moonmoon? Jptdknpa

Did they ask the publics opinion? No?

What would you name one Fork? I'd call them Microlites. chuckle
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 466907
10-11-2018 11:55 PM

 



Post: #53
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
They are all planets at that point
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Bao2
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User ID: 422170
10-12-2018 12:11 AM

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Post: #54
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
LoP Guest  Wrote: (10-11-2018 04:11 PM)
Skip.  Wrote: (10-11-2018 04:10 PM)
Our Moon's name isn't "Moon". That's just a description of it. Like calling Earth "The Planet".

Anyone here know the Moon's name? Anyone....?

Luna

Luna and Sol is "moon" and "sun" in spanish
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Fork
fork in the road
User ID: 361628
10-12-2018 09:01 AM

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Post: #55
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
Puddycat! Thanks for adding that great info!
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Fork
fork in the road
User ID: 361628
10-12-2018 09:03 AM

Posts: 12,140



Post: #56
RE: Bigger Moons Have Moons called Moonmoons
My Daddy named me 2Moons.

Leet
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