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How much of your house do you own?
titanic1
Registered User
User ID: 348722
12-21-2016 08:41 AM

Posts: 9,723



Post: #1
How much of your house do you own?
Advertisement




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTItT-JLjdE


Even if you think you own your home free and clear, you really don’t own it at all. You lease it from the State and it sets the terms and conditions that allow you to occupy the house or sell it to another lessee. The State owns the house and land in perpetuity and you can not alter this arrangement.

When I was a kid my dad bought a new four-bedroom house in 1964 for about $28,000. He had a good job and stuck his financial neck out by taking on a whopping monthly payment of $190 on a twenty-five year mortgage. He and my mom would talk about how when they got the house paid off they would not have to pay the $190 every month and that would basically put them on Easy Street.

[Image: quote-i-enjoy-living-in-a-nice-house-and...-87-39.jpg]

My dad never made it the twenty five years. By the time my mom paid off the mortgage the monthly property tax bill was $450 per month! There is no way to pay that off once and for all and, in fact, it is subject to constant increase by political whim. Eventually the money paid in relentless property taxes exceeds the cost of the home. What was true for her is true for all homeowners.

Moreover, the terms and conditions under which you occupy “your” home are a further burden to you. You can’t add onto the home without permission, you can’t subdivide the land without permission. You can only have certain pets and only a certain number of them. You must maintain the home to a certain standard. Violation of any rule can cause you to lose the home and be evicted for repeated non-compliance with State orders. (After all, they are the true owners.)

[Image: quote-whatever-you-may-look-like-marry-a...-87-17.jpg]

Depending on your tax jurisdiction, when you die a large portion of your home’s value can be claimed by the State and your heirs would either have to pony up the cash or sell the home to pay the inheritance taxes. Then the State resets the clock with the new “tenant.”

From: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info...e37300.htm

On paper, the concept of land ownership sounds very simple- you pay money and in return you’re given unfettered access to a predetermined amount of land. But how much of that land do you actually own? Do you own the sky above it? How about the land below it? What about all the animals that may live there; do you own those too? All of these questions and more define what exactly it means to “own” a piece of land. Surprisingly, many of the answers aren’t well defined from a legal standpoint as you’ll soon see.

(Note: The laws governing one’s rights as a landowner vary considerably depending on location, even within a given country or state. With that caveat noted, we’ll endeavor to answer the above questions and a couple more in the general case for places like the United States and the UK.)

[Image: quote-we-dream-of-having-a-clean-house-b...-38-40.jpg]

First of all, let’s deal with how much of the air above your property you own since that particular question has been one of the more common queries about owning or buying land we’ve received here at Today I Found Out over the years. Historically speaking, if you owned a piece of land, you owned everything both above and below the soil from the deepest reaches of the Earth right up to the heavens themselves, giving you a near infinite amount of property in the universe with your property ever changing as the Earth rotates and the various celestial bodies move around.

A popular maxim in regards to this concept is, “Cuius est solum, eius est usque ad coelum et ad inferos” which basically translates to: “whoever owns the soil, holds title all the way up to the heavens and down to the depths of hell“.

Within the legal world, this maxim is described as “the traditional starting point of property law” and it is considered to have been instrumental in shaping what we understand as property law today. Curiously, despite its ancient sounding nature, the specific maxim can only be traced as far back as the 13th century and it is largely believed to have been the brainchild of Italian scholar, Accursius. It’s commonly assumed that the maxim made its way into English and subsequently American law thanks to Accurius’ son, who was invited to England to teach law at the request of the then King, Edward I.

Its first use in court is attributed to the case of Bury V Pope in 1587, during which the maxim was cited as justification for a large structure being erected that blocked out the natural light to another property owner’s home. Since back in those days there was no such thing as the “right to light” (essentially the right to not have the flow of natural light to your home impeded), it was decided that the building of the structure was entirely legal, since the owner of the land owned all of the air above his land too.

[Image: quote-don-t-think-thinking-is-the-enemy-...-38-54.jpg]

Today, the maxim is still used as a guideline. However, as a property owner you only really have the right to the airspace above your land located in the lower stratum, the precise boundaries of which are not explicitly labelled. In the end, you are supposed to be entitled to enough airspace to reasonably enjoy the land below that air. However, exactly what this means is up for debate. For example, you can’t ask commercial planes to stop flying over your house, because the sky is considered to be a public highway. You could potentially, however, prosecute an overzealous news helicopter for hovering over your house if it was impeding your enjoyment of the land. Again, this would vary on a case-by-case basis but there have been instances of people being fined for trespassing for flying over someone’s land; so it’s not unheard of in US or British law.

The most famous case of this kind comes from 1945 when a chicken farmer named Thomas Lee Causby sued the US government for flying approximately 83 feet above his property, the noise of which caused a bunch of Causby’s chicken’s to accidentally kill themselves by running into walls. Causby won his case and the courts agreed that although a property owner wasn’t entitled to own all of the air above their land, they were entitled to enough so that planes flying overhead wouldn’t kill their chickens. Progress!

Today in the UK thanks to the Civil Aviation Act of 1982, the generally accepted amount of air above one’s roof a person is entitled to is approximately 500-1,000 feet, though again this isn’t a hard definition. Likewise, the United States has a similar estimation of about 500 feet, though this has never been officially ruled on by the Supreme Court.

In both cases, this may be soon changing with the widespread introduction of drones, both personal, commercial, and those owned by the respective governments. As such, the U.S. federal government particularly has recently been looking into significantly lowering the airspace “public highway” floor to accommodate this type of aircraft.

With that out of the way, what about the earth below your land? Well, again, this varies because owning land doesn’t necessarily mean you own the mineral rights to it. In a nutshell, the owner of the respective mineral rights to a piece of land is entitled to those substances that could potentially be sitting below a given property and it’s not uncommon for them to be sold separately to land and property rights. And there have been cases in the past of home-owners finding out that there is a huge deposit of gas under their home that they don’t have rights to, and have no right to stop the owner of the mineral rights drilling for. Beyond the loss of money from that gas if you didn’t own the mineral rights, this can sometimes kill any property value your land may have previously had.

However, if you own both the land and all the mineral rights to a property and you live in the US, everything below the ground belongs to you, unless you happen to stumble on an Indian burial ground or something, in which case you have to report it.

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/...lly-right/

LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 393202
12-21-2016 09:15 AM

 



Post: #2
RE: How much of your house do you own?
Yawn.
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 398144
12-21-2016 09:19 AM

 



Post: #3
RE: How much of your house do you own?
titanic1  Wrote: (12-21-2016 08:41 AM)



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTItT-JLjdE


Even if you think you own your home free and clear, you really don’t own it at all. You lease it from the State and it sets the terms and conditions that allow you to occupy the house or sell it to another lessee. The State owns the house and land in perpetuity and you can not alter this arrangement.

When I was a kid my dad bought a new four-bedroom house in 1964 for about $28,000. He had a good job and stuck his financial neck out by taking on a whopping monthly payment of $190 on a twenty-five year mortgage. He and my mom would talk about how when they got the house paid off they would not have to pay the $190 every month and that would basically put them on Easy Street.

link to image: http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/q...-87-39.jpg

My dad never made it the twenty five years. By the time my mom paid off the mortgage the monthly property tax bill was $450 per month! There is no way to pay that off once and for all and, in fact, it is subject to constant increase by political whim. Eventually the money paid in relentless property taxes exceeds the cost of the home. What was true for her is true for all homeowners.

Moreover, the terms and conditions under which you occupy “your” home are a further burden to you. You can’t add onto the home without permission, you can’t subdivide the land without permission. You can only have certain pets and only a certain number of them. You must maintain the home to a certain standard. Violation of any rule can cause you to lose the home and be evicted for repeated non-compliance with State orders. (After all, they are the true owners.)

link to image: http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/q...-87-17.jpg

Depending on your tax jurisdiction, when you die a large portion of your home’s value can be claimed by the State and your heirs would either have to pony up the cash or sell the home to pay the inheritance taxes. Then the State resets the clock with the new “tenant.”

From: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info...e37300.htm

On paper, the concept of land ownership sounds very simple- you pay money and in return you’re given unfettered access to a predetermined amount of land. But how much of that land do you actually own? Do you own the sky above it? How about the land below it? What about all the animals that may live there; do you own those too? All of these questions and more define what exactly it means to “own” a piece of land. Surprisingly, many of the answers aren’t well defined from a legal standpoint as you’ll soon see.

(Note: The laws governing one’s rights as a landowner vary considerably depending on location, even within a given country or state. With that caveat noted, we’ll endeavor to answer the above questions and a couple more in the general case for places like the United States and the UK.)

link to image: http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/q...-38-40.jpg

First of all, let’s deal with how much of the air above your property you own since that particular question has been one of the more common queries about owning or buying land we’ve received here at Today I Found Out over the years. Historically speaking, if you owned a piece of land, you owned everything both above and below the soil from the deepest reaches of the Earth right up to the heavens themselves, giving you a near infinite amount of property in the universe with your property ever changing as the Earth rotates and the various celestial bodies move around.

A popular maxim in regards to this concept is, “Cuius est solum, eius est usque ad coelum et ad inferos” which basically translates to: “whoever owns the soil, holds title all the way up to the heavens and down to the depths of hell“.

Within the legal world, this maxim is described as “the traditional starting point of property law” and it is considered to have been instrumental in shaping what we understand as property law today. Curiously, despite its ancient sounding nature, the specific maxim can only be traced as far back as the 13th century and it is largely believed to have been the brainchild of Italian scholar, Accursius. It’s commonly assumed that the maxim made its way into English and subsequently American law thanks to Accurius’ son, who was invited to England to teach law at the request of the then King, Edward I.

Its first use in court is attributed to the case of Bury V Pope in 1587, during which the maxim was cited as justification for a large structure being erected that blocked out the natural light to another property owner’s home. Since back in those days there was no such thing as the “right to light” (essentially the right to not have the flow of natural light to your home impeded), it was decided that the building of the structure was entirely legal, since the owner of the land owned all of the air above his land too.

link to image: http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/q...-38-54.jpg

Today, the maxim is still used as a guideline. However, as a property owner you only really have the right to the airspace above your land located in the lower stratum, the precise boundaries of which are not explicitly labelled. In the end, you are supposed to be entitled to enough airspace to reasonably enjoy the land below that air. However, exactly what this means is up for debate. For example, you can’t ask commercial planes to stop flying over your house, because the sky is considered to be a public highway. You could potentially, however, prosecute an overzealous news helicopter for hovering over your house if it was impeding your enjoyment of the land. Again, this would vary on a case-by-case basis but there have been instances of people being fined for trespassing for flying over someone’s land; so it’s not unheard of in US or British law.

The most famous case of this kind comes from 1945 when a chicken farmer named Thomas Lee Causby sued the US government for flying approximately 83 feet above his property, the noise of which caused a bunch of Causby’s chicken’s to accidentally kill themselves by running into walls. Causby won his case and the courts agreed that although a property owner wasn’t entitled to own all of the air above their land, they were entitled to enough so that planes flying overhead wouldn’t kill their chickens. Progress!

Today in the UK thanks to the Civil Aviation Act of 1982, the generally accepted amount of air above one’s roof a person is entitled to is approximately 500-1,000 feet, though again this isn’t a hard definition. Likewise, the United States has a similar estimation of about 500 feet, though this has never been officially ruled on by the Supreme Court.

In both cases, this may be soon changing with the widespread introduction of drones, both personal, commercial, and those owned by the respective governments. As such, the U.S. federal government particularly has recently been looking into significantly lowering the airspace “public highway” floor to accommodate this type of aircraft.

With that out of the way, what about the earth below your land? Well, again, this varies because owning land doesn’t necessarily mean you own the mineral rights to it. In a nutshell, the owner of the respective mineral rights to a piece of land is entitled to those substances that could potentially be sitting below a given property and it’s not uncommon for them to be sold separately to land and property rights. And there have been cases in the past of home-owners finding out that there is a huge deposit of gas under their home that they don’t have rights to, and have no right to stop the owner of the mineral rights drilling for. Beyond the loss of money from that gas if you didn’t own the mineral rights, this can sometimes kill any property value your land may have previously had.

However, if you own both the land and all the mineral rights to a property and you live in the US, everything below the ground belongs to you, unless you happen to stumble on an Indian burial ground or something, in which case you have to report it.

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/...lly-right/

DOes it matter?
All of us have a time stamp and when we die we take nothing with us to the other side.
All we "own" here is an illusion.
Skippy
Keep the Yule in Yuletide
User ID: 278823
12-21-2016 09:22 AM

Posts: 36,786



Post: #4
RE: How much of your house do you own?
Hey Titanic... I want one of your black background quote memes...
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 393202
12-21-2016 09:22 AM

 



Post: #5
RE: How much of your house do you own?
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-21-2016 09:19 AM)
titanic1  Wrote: (12-21-2016 08:41 AM)



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTItT-JLjdE


Even if you think you own your home free and clear, you really don’t own it at all. You lease it from the State and it sets the terms and conditions that allow you to occupy the house or sell it to another lessee. The State owns the house and land in perpetuity and you can not alter this arrangement.

When I was a kid my dad bought a new four-bedroom house in 1964 for about $28,000. He had a good job and stuck his financial neck out by taking on a whopping monthly payment of $190 on a twenty-five year mortgage. He and my mom would talk about how when they got the house paid off they would not have to pay the $190 every month and that would basically put them on Easy Street.

link to image: http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/q...-87-39.jpg

My dad never made it the twenty five years. By the time my mom paid off the mortgage the monthly property tax bill was $450 per month! There is no way to pay that off once and for all and, in fact, it is subject to constant increase by political whim. Eventually the money paid in relentless property taxes exceeds the cost of the home. What was true for her is true for all homeowners.

Moreover, the terms and conditions under which you occupy “your” home are a further burden to you. You can’t add onto the home without permission, you can’t subdivide the land without permission. You can only have certain pets and only a certain number of them. You must maintain the home to a certain standard. Violation of any rule can cause you to lose the home and be evicted for repeated non-compliance with State orders. (After all, they are the true owners.)

link to image: http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/q...-87-17.jpg

Depending on your tax jurisdiction, when you die a large portion of your home’s value can be claimed by the State and your heirs would either have to pony up the cash or sell the home to pay the inheritance taxes. Then the State resets the clock with the new “tenant.”

From: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info...e37300.htm

On paper, the concept of land ownership sounds very simple- you pay money and in return you’re given unfettered access to a predetermined amount of land. But how much of that land do you actually own? Do you own the sky above it? How about the land below it? What about all the animals that may live there; do you own those too? All of these questions and more define what exactly it means to “own” a piece of land. Surprisingly, many of the answers aren’t well defined from a legal standpoint as you’ll soon see.

(Note: The laws governing one’s rights as a landowner vary considerably depending on location, even within a given country or state. With that caveat noted, we’ll endeavor to answer the above questions and a couple more in the general case for places like the United States and the UK.)

link to image: http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/q...-38-40.jpg

First of all, let’s deal with how much of the air above your property you own since that particular question has been one of the more common queries about owning or buying land we’ve received here at Today I Found Out over the years. Historically speaking, if you owned a piece of land, you owned everything both above and below the soil from the deepest reaches of the Earth right up to the heavens themselves, giving you a near infinite amount of property in the universe with your property ever changing as the Earth rotates and the various celestial bodies move around.

A popular maxim in regards to this concept is, “Cuius est solum, eius est usque ad coelum et ad inferos” which basically translates to: “whoever owns the soil, holds title all the way up to the heavens and down to the depths of hell“.

Within the legal world, this maxim is described as “the traditional starting point of property law” and it is considered to have been instrumental in shaping what we understand as property law today. Curiously, despite its ancient sounding nature, the specific maxim can only be traced as far back as the 13th century and it is largely believed to have been the brainchild of Italian scholar, Accursius. It’s commonly assumed that the maxim made its way into English and subsequently American law thanks to Accurius’ son, who was invited to England to teach law at the request of the then King, Edward I.

Its first use in court is attributed to the case of Bury V Pope in 1587, during which the maxim was cited as justification for a large structure being erected that blocked out the natural light to another property owner’s home. Since back in those days there was no such thing as the “right to light” (essentially the right to not have the flow of natural light to your home impeded), it was decided that the building of the structure was entirely legal, since the owner of the land owned all of the air above his land too.

link to image: http://www.azquotes.com/picture-quotes/q...-38-54.jpg

Today, the maxim is still used as a guideline. However, as a property owner you only really have the right to the airspace above your land located in the lower stratum, the precise boundaries of which are not explicitly labelled. In the end, you are supposed to be entitled to enough airspace to reasonably enjoy the land below that air. However, exactly what this means is up for debate. For example, you can’t ask commercial planes to stop flying over your house, because the sky is considered to be a public highway. You could potentially, however, prosecute an overzealous news helicopter for hovering over your house if it was impeding your enjoyment of the land. Again, this would vary on a case-by-case basis but there have been instances of people being fined for trespassing for flying over someone’s land; so it’s not unheard of in US or British law.

The most famous case of this kind comes from 1945 when a chicken farmer named Thomas Lee Causby sued the US government for flying approximately 83 feet above his property, the noise of which caused a bunch of Causby’s chicken’s to accidentally kill themselves by running into walls. Causby won his case and the courts agreed that although a property owner wasn’t entitled to own all of the air above their land, they were entitled to enough so that planes flying overhead wouldn’t kill their chickens. Progress!

Today in the UK thanks to the Civil Aviation Act of 1982, the generally accepted amount of air above one’s roof a person is entitled to is approximately 500-1,000 feet, though again this isn’t a hard definition. Likewise, the United States has a similar estimation of about 500 feet, though this has never been officially ruled on by the Supreme Court.

In both cases, this may be soon changing with the widespread introduction of drones, both personal, commercial, and those owned by the respective governments. As such, the U.S. federal government particularly has recently been looking into significantly lowering the airspace “public highway” floor to accommodate this type of aircraft.

With that out of the way, what about the earth below your land? Well, again, this varies because owning land doesn’t necessarily mean you own the mineral rights to it. In a nutshell, the owner of the respective mineral rights to a piece of land is entitled to those substances that could potentially be sitting below a given property and it’s not uncommon for them to be sold separately to land and property rights. And there have been cases in the past of home-owners finding out that there is a huge deposit of gas under their home that they don’t have rights to, and have no right to stop the owner of the mineral rights drilling for. Beyond the loss of money from that gas if you didn’t own the mineral rights, this can sometimes kill any property value your land may have previously had.

However, if you own both the land and all the mineral rights to a property and you live in the US, everything below the ground belongs to you, unless you happen to stumble on an Indian burial ground or something, in which case you have to report it.

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/...lly-right/

DOes it matter?
All of us have a time stamp and when we die we take nothing with us to the other side.
All we "own" here is an illusion.

Dumbasses be dumbassing...
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 398149
12-21-2016 10:18 AM

 



Post: #6
RE: How much of your house do you own?
Donald Trump knows it well.

He has used eminent domain in Two nations to try and steal multiple people's homes and land.
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 398150
12-21-2016 10:18 AM

 



Post: #7
RE: How much of your house do you own?
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-21-2016 09:22 AM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-21-2016 09:19 AM)
DOes it matter?
All of us have a time stamp and when we die we take nothing with us to the other side.
All we "own" here is an illusion.

Dumbasses be dumbassing...

do not be so hard on yourself, stupid ass

th poster was right and you are blind
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 397437
12-21-2016 10:40 AM

 



Post: #8
RE: How much of your house do you own?
But still, it is better than renting.
LopDude
Meow
User ID: 391318
12-21-2016 10:52 AM

Posts: 8,294



Post: #9
RE: How much of your house do you own?
our house was taken away many years ago -before there was reverse mortgage..before there was a trend of bank owned crisis. we are renting now. even renting is a double edged sword, it sucks bad man

[Image: np57gsp-gif.3372]
[Image: aldupoa15b5.png]
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 300849
12-21-2016 11:09 AM

 



Post: #10
RE: How much of your house do you own?
TP.inc  Wrote: (12-21-2016 10:52 AM)
our house was taken away many years ago -before there was reverse mortgage..before there was a trend of bank owned crisis. we are renting now. even renting is a double edged sword, it sucks bad man

Everything in this world is on a loan base, we do not own anything really. When we die we leave it all behind.
Fukunova
Arbor scientiae
User ID: 363637
12-21-2016 11:10 AM

Posts: 6,295



Post: #11
RE: How much of your house do you own?
So you live a happy life in your own home you paid for.
You worked your ass of your entire life, only to die in that same house.

Then someone else will buy your house, for a much higher price, since the owner before (you) put so much money in it took make it look better, and feel more like 'home', So you will feel special about yourself.

Consume you fools! We want you to feel better about yourself! You are so special! Everyone is so fvcking special..



*Why is this pinned?

More, give me more. Give me more
If I had a heart I could love you
If I had a voice I would sing
After the night when I wake up
I'll see what tomorrow brings
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 397198
12-21-2016 11:14 AM

 



Post: #12
RE: How much of your house do you own?
I call bullshit on the article.

He claims that in 1964 , his dad bought the house for about $28,000 and it had a 25 year mortgage, which was paid off by his mom....which takes us to the year 1989......and then he claims the monthly property taxes were $450 , which is almost $5000 a year ......this does not make any sense, unless they were living in 1 of the most prestigious areas on earth, in a mansion with 100 acres of land.


I would guess that the author is a bullshitter, or his parents were living beyond their means and needed to find a home they could afford to upkeep.
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 397198
12-21-2016 11:17 AM

 



Post: #13
RE: How much of your house do you own?
Fukunova  Wrote: (12-21-2016 11:10 AM)
So you live a happy life in your own home you paid for.
You worked your ass of your entire life, only to die in that same house.

Then someone else will buy your house, for a much higher price, since the owner before (you) put so much money in it took make it look better, and feel more like 'home', So you will feel special about yourself.

Consume you fools! We want you to feel better about yourself! You are so special! Everyone is so fvcking special..



*Why is this pinned?

Your scenario is not always valid.

You claim, " someone else will purchase your house, for a much higher price....not always true.

I sold my residence back in 2007, right before the housing market crash, for $250,000 ......then that person sold it in 2015 for $140,000 .
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 397198
12-21-2016 11:19 AM

 



Post: #14
RE: How much of your house do you own?
Live is not nearly as hard, as people make it.

Live within your means, be happy with the simple things , and stay away from losers, troublemakers and pessismistic people.

Dont have kids, unless you know you can afford to raise them for 20 years

Dont go into massive debt.

etc.
Fukunova
Arbor scientiae
User ID: 363637
12-21-2016 11:21 AM

Posts: 6,295



Post: #15
RE: How much of your house do you own?
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-21-2016 11:17 AM)
Fukunova  Wrote: (12-21-2016 11:10 AM)
So you live a happy life in your own home you paid for.
You worked your ass of your entire life, only to die in that same house.

Then someone else will buy your house, for a much higher price, since the owner before (you) put so much money in it took make it look better, and feel more like 'home', So you will feel special about yourself.

Consume you fools! We want you to feel better about yourself! You are so special! Everyone is so fvcking special..



*Why is this pinned?

Your scenario is not always valid.

You claim, " someone else will purchase your house, for a much higher price....not always true.

I sold my residence back in 2007, right before the housing market crash, for $250,000 ......then that person sold it in 2015 for $140,000 .

Keyword being "housing market crash" here^

Also, that person is a dumbass for not waiting a few years.

Or maybe he was not happy, and did not feel special at all..

More, give me more. Give me more
If I had a heart I could love you
If I had a voice I would sing
After the night when I wake up
I'll see what tomorrow brings
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