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Pigs share 98% of human genes
titanic1
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User ID: 348722
01-12-2017 06:11 AM

Posts: 9,725



Post: #1
Pigs share 98% of human genes
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MpTkh6-hz6k


Like it or not, we've all got a lot in common with pigs. We're omnivorous mammals that gain weight easily and are susceptible to the flu for starters.

The sheer fact that pigs and humans are mammals means that we share some genes. But it is simplistic to put an actual figure on the amount of genetic material we have in common, says animal geneticist Professor Chris Moran from the University of Sydney's Faculty of Veterinary Science.

"Making broad comparisons by saying … 98 per cent of [human] genes are similar to a chimpanzee or whatever else … tend to be a little bit misleading," says Moran.

The amount of genetic material we share with other species depends upon what you compare.

[Image: manpig.jpg]

All living organisms have genetic information encoded in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), divided into units called genes. Information is transferred from the genes via a chemical called ribonucleic acid (RNA). Some RNA is translated into chains of amino-acid that make up proteins, the building blocks of every living cell.

Scientists have discovered about 20,000 mammalian genes that encode proteins with similar basic functions. So if you compare the protein-encoding portion of our DNA we have a lot in common with a lot of mammals.

"Mammals have most of the same genes for similar biochemical and physiological functions. If you look at the details of the genes … there'll be differences between them, but they'll still be doing the same kind of function," says Moran.

"It's a little bit like having a Ford or a Holden — it's still obviously a car but a slightly different version."

But while 20,000 similar genes sounds like a lot, only one to two per cent of our DNA actually encodes proteins. Most of the rest is transcribed into RNA.

Some RNAs that don't carry the plans for proteins have important structural or functional roles in their own right. Transfer RNAs, for example, ferry specific amino acids into a growing protein, while ribosomal RNA constitutes part of the factories in cells that manufacture proteins.

But we are only just beginning to understand what many other non-coding RNA molecules do. Some control higher level functions such as the expression of protein-encoding genes, and some have even been implicated in memory.

[Image: _72044893_dscn0816.jpg]

Evolutionary differences
Parts of the genome that don't encode proteins tend to evolve rapidly, so you can have significant regions of the genome where there's no discernible similarity between species, says Moran. This means many sequences will not line up when you compare genomes between species.

And the further away two species are on the evolutionary tree, the greater the difference.

"If we compare really closely related species, like a human and chimpanzee, we can still see the similarity between these rapidly changing sequences. If you move further away to the more distantly related pig, so many changes in the DNA will have occurred that it is no longer possible to recognise that the sequences were ever similar.

"Depending upon what it is that you are comparing you can say 'Yes, there's a very high degree of similarity, for example between a human and a pig protein coding sequence', but if you compare rapidly evolving non-coding sequences from a similar location in the genome, you may not be able to recognise any similarity at all. This means that blanket comparisons of all DNA sequences between species are not very meaningful."

One area where comparison of genome sequences isn't all that relevant, says Moran, is the emerging science of transplanting organs and tissues from pigs to humans.

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2...887206.htm

When George Orwell wrote in his classic novel Animal Farm that man and pig are almost identical he was closer to the truth than he realised, according to a new study.
Scientists have undertaken the largest ever study of the pig genome have found that swine are adaptable, easy to seduce with food and susceptible to domestication - much like humans.
The findings, published in the journal Nature, also show that pigs suffer from the same genetic and protein malfunctions that account for many human diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and obesity.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/a...z4VW7LWElQ
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 320526
01-12-2017 06:30 AM

 



Post: #2
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
That's because we were made partially from pigs. Bats also.
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 397193
01-12-2017 06:37 AM

 



Post: #3
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
Monkeys too... and the banana.
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 397193
01-12-2017 06:40 AM

 



Post: #4
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 401215
01-12-2017 06:41 AM

 



Post: #5
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
That why most cannibals mention we taste like pig!chuckle
Johntaraz
A Hunger Artist
User ID: 338414
01-12-2017 07:04 AM

Posts: 9,258



Post: #6
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
Humans and mice share nearly 90 percent of human DNA.

Humans share 99.9% in common.

Its the RNA combination strains that communicate between DNA that can be entirely different.

""Depending upon what it is that you are comparing you can say 'Yes, there's a very high degree of similarity, for example between a human and a pig protein coding sequence', but if you compare rapidly evolving non-coding sequences from a similar location in the genome, you may not be able to recognise any similarity at all. This means that blanket comparisons of all DNA sequences between species are not very meaningful."

One area where comparison of genome sequences isn't all that relevant, says Moran, is the emerging science of transplanting organs and tissues from pigs to humans.

"[The success of pig-human transplants] has very little to do with whether there's a two per cent or 20 per cent difference in the genome sequence — if those numbers actually meant anything anyway — the main barrier is caused by just one gene," says Moran.

That gene is called galactose-alpha-1,3,galactotransferase — gal-transferase for short . All mammals except humans and higher apes have a working version of gal-transferase, which coats cells with an antigen (a molecule that our immune system reacts to). This means if pig tissue is transplanted into humans our immune system will mount a drastic rejection response as our bodies detect the antigen and attack it.

Scientists have come up with a solution to stop tissue rejection: genetically modifying the pigs by eliminating the gal-transferase gene. A few more human genes are also added to the pigs to make the pig tissue even more acceptable to our immune system."
http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2...887206.htm

"The unexamined life is not worth living."--Socrates"
There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true; the other is to refuse to believe what is true."
— Søren Kierkegaard
AnyoneElse
Registered User
User ID: 398112
01-12-2017 07:28 AM

Posts: 301



Post: #7
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes




Just wanted to share this. Honestly I think God would like Scientist to have at it while they still can.



(This post was last modified: 01-12-2017 07:33 AM by AnyoneElse.)
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 401241
01-12-2017 07:35 AM

 



Post: #8
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
Apex to human, Pig to human blood donations.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=w...MThE2_GYBA
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 401241
01-12-2017 07:37 AM

 



Post: #9
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
Damn word sub! Ape not Apex. Anyway...

They're blood actually is quite similar to human blood. The size of red blood cells is similar. So is the typical red blood cell life span, the hemoglobin content and structure, and other factors, plus pigs can be genetically modified to produce red blood cells that are equivalent to human type O negative.

Read more at link posted above.
Dr. Who
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User ID: 398084
01-12-2017 07:39 AM

 



Post: #10
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
My father had the first pig knee to replace his shattered elbow. This in the early thirties. They didn't know what would happen.
AnyoneElse
Registered User
User ID: 398112
01-12-2017 07:42 AM

Posts: 301



Post: #11
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
Dr. Who  Wrote: (01-12-2017 07:39 AM)
My father had the first pig knee to replace his shattered elbow. This in the early thirties. They didn't know what would happen.

Awwww Chet!

[Image: Herbert-Hoover.jpg]
titanic1
Registered User
User ID: 348722
01-12-2017 07:45 AM

Posts: 9,725



Post: #12
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
Dr. Who  Wrote: (01-12-2017 07:39 AM)
My father had the first pig knee to replace his shattered elbow. This in the early thirties. They didn't know what would happen.

Did it work out ok for him? They must've thought that it wouldn't be rejected by his body.
Munchaab
Born into a life sentence
User ID: 349851
01-12-2017 07:47 AM

Posts: 5,394



Post: #13
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
***Bananas share about 60% of the same DNA as humans![/size]
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 401231
01-12-2017 08:10 AM

 



Post: #14
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
I saw some old footage of the military testing flame throwers on pigs to see what it would do. They put a metal prod in a pigs rectum and shocked ít,these are very disturbing images I will never forget...The government is f*cking sick.Jhikpghf
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 401257
01-12-2017 08:11 AM

 



Post: #15
RE: Pigs share 98% of human genes
I'm not sharing MY jeans with a pig!

It would rip out the hip seams and punch a corky hole on my hiney area!

: )
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