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Egg Mountain Montana
titanic1
Registered User
User ID: 411408
03-20-2017 06:25 PM

Posts: 9,030



Post: #1
Egg Mountain Montana
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZwkISrDxdc





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yQFcqoL1eM

Egg Mountain located along the Rocky Mountain Front south of Choteau, is the site of the world's first discovery of dinosaur embryos by Museum of the Rockies paleontologists September 14, 1983. Egg Mountain is one of 16 places in Montana that a team of geologists, paleontologists and Montana historians have identified as geological wonders. An interpretive sign between mile posts 57 and 58 on U.S. Highway 287, provides travelers information about Egg Mountain.

[Image: dinosaur-eggs-gobi-expedition_dynamic_lead_slide.jpg]

In 1978, rock-shop owner Marion Brandvold found a group of small bones that paleontologists Jack Horner and Bob Makela later identified as baby bones belonging to a new species of duck-billed dinosaur. Horner and Makela named this new species Maiasaura peeblesorum, the good mother reptile.

The site where the Maiasaura bones were found was named Egg Mountain, and has since yielded the largest cache of dinosaur eggs, embryos, and baby skeletons found in the Western Hemisphere. The site has also yielded one of the largest concentrations of adult dinosaur skeletons found in the world. Paleontologists have interpreted this accumulation as a gigantic herd of Maiasaura that died in a catastrophic event, possibly resulting from a volcanic eruption or a hurricane.

Read more.... http://www.visitmt.com/listings/general/...ntain.html

Both Egg Mountain and the Maiasaura locality are rich in egg, baby, and adult fossils. The animals themselves roamed a broad flat coastal plain along the edge of the Cretaceous Interior Seaway approximately 77 million years ago. The Egg Mountain locality has produced remains of adult and embryonic Troodon (a small meat-eater) and adult Orodromeus (a small plant-eater), as well as remains of cretaceous mammals, lizards, and pterosaurs. The Maiasaura locality has yielded literally thousands of individual fossils, all believed to be from the single species of Maiasaura. The original Maiasaura nest contained remains of baby dinosaurs that had been hatched for some time before their demise. Because these individuals had remained in the nest after hatching, some individual (most likely the mother!) had to have been caring for the babies. This was the first indisputable evidence that dinosaurs were capable of any sort of complex behavior.

The Maiasaura’s round nests were six or seven feet wide and could hold up to 25 eggs. The hatched babies were about one foot long. Adult Maiasaurs weighed almost 6,000 pounds and were almost 30 feet long. The nests of Troodon at Egg Mountain itself are about half the diameter of the Maiasaura nests, but they contained roughly the same numbers of eggs.

[Image: maiasaura-dinosaur-embryo-egg.jpg]

Egg Mountain is located near Choteau, Montana, and dinosaur research continues in the area to this day. Both of Montana’s dinosaur research facilities are actively working on projects in the local Two Medicine Formation. While the Egg Mountain area is closed to the public, access to area fossils is available through public programs at the Two Medicine Dinosaur Center in Bynum, and undergraduate and graduate studies are available through Montana State University/Museum of the Rockies.

Read more... http://centralmontana.com/specialinteres...gmountain/

WEST OF THE small town of Choteau, Montana, near the Rocky Mountain Front, is a very special site known for its dinosaurs called the Beatrice Taylor Dinosaur Research Station, owned by the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana. Over the past 30 years this research area has produced the first dinosaur egg clutches known from the Western Hemisphere, the first dinosaur embryos found in the world, the first dinosaur nests containing babies and showing for the first time that dinosaurs cared for their young, evidence of the largest group of dinosaur skeletons on earth (evidence of more than 15,000 skeletons), nesting grounds for the duck-billed dinosaur Maiasaura and the little meat-eating dinosaur Troodon, and remains of one of the largest flying reptiles. The popular name for this research area is "Egg Mountain," and the camp site is called Camp Makela after the late Bob Makela, who worked with Jack Horner in this area for many years.

from: https://www.wired.com/2011/10/ff_chickensaurus-gallery/
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loNeNLI
lop guest
User ID: 266585
03-20-2017 06:41 PM

 



Post: #2
RE: Egg Mountain Montana
Bump

'77 million' is but a wild guess [since time-dimensions changed]
but bump
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 388796
03-21-2017 01:51 AM

 



Post: #3
RE: Egg Mountain Montana
sweet, my son needs a book report for his 3rd grade earth sciences class, you don't mind if we copy paste your work, do you OP ?
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 397176
03-21-2017 02:31 AM

 



Post: #4
RE: Egg Mountain Montana
I can create a fossil egg in 30 days, by hanging it from a waterfall.

Fossils: Millions of Years?
http://www.johnpratt.com/items/docs/lds/...ified.html

So while the dino egg is a dino, it is not millions of years old. In fact, through normal erosion of earth it proves this to not the case.



Eroding Ages
Dr Tasman Bruce Walker
Creationist Mechanical Engineer and Geologist

It was James Hutton, the Scottish physician-turned-geologist, who suggested in 1785 that the earth was immensely old. His famous assertion that there was ‘no vestige of a beginning, no prospect of an end’ paved the way for Darwin’s theory of evolution. Today most geologists take Hutton’s views for granted. Evolutionists generally accept that the continents formed at least 2.5 billion years ago.

These ideas are found to be wholly unconvincing once we take a closer look. We find that there are many geological processes that indicate the continents are not as old as evolutionists say. One such problem for the old-age idea is erosion. The continents cannot be billions of years old because they would have eroded away long ago. There should be nothing left.

Continents Are Young

The ‘slow and gradual’ story, suggested by the Scottish physician Hutton two hundred years ago, does not make sense. Old-earthers claim that the continents are over 2.5 billion years old, yet using their own assumptions, the continents should have eroded away in 10 million years. Note that this 10 million years is not the estimated age of the continents. Rather, it highlights the bankruptcy of uniformitarian ideas.

Geologists who believe the Bible consider that the mountains and continents we have today were formed as a consequence of the Flood of Noah’s day. When the continents were uplifted at the end of the Flood, the incredible energy of the retreating flood waters carved the landscape. Not a lot, geologically speaking, has happened in the 4,500 years since then.

http://creation.com/eroding-ages
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 252109
03-21-2017 02:56 AM

 



Post: #5
RE: Egg Mountain Montana
numerous cultures have dinos on artwork, walls, and kids toys.....


id doubt they are that old.
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Blueacres nli
lop guest
User ID: 411445
03-21-2017 03:06 AM

 



Post: #6
RE: Egg Mountain Montana
They should call that first one a "Buckbilled Clatterhoss".

Popcorn
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Folks.
lop guest
User ID: 406024
03-21-2017 03:48 AM

 



Post: #7
RE: Egg Mountain Montana
Where the he'll have you been man?!?!?!?

Have I just been missing you?

Hugs
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Heir
Registered User
User ID: 397170
03-21-2017 11:14 AM

Posts: 2,776



Post: #8
gmorning RE: Egg Mountain Montana
LoP Guest  Wrote: (03-21-2017 02:31 AM)
I can create a fossil egg in 30 days, by hanging it from a waterfall.

Then We have Mt. St. Helens .

Huge tree trunks with root balls blown into lake waters , to sink roots first and stone up in two / three years .

Lot's of fun that " Scientists Surprised " reaction .

Local Link DELETED : The Constitution - Estate in Trust for the Heirs of Freedom

See : The Legacy On Archives Org
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