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building the new garden .... on a budget .... update
something robo
lop guest
User ID: 402407
05-07-2017 04:14 AM

 



Post: #46
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
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hey guys.ive always been suckin st gardening but loved the hobby.i have east texas red and yellow clay.folks kept saying.lime it.well they was wrong.i added one bail of peat per 200sq ft of soil.my soil digs like butter now.i read 2000 page thread on organic cannabis gardening.took me two weeks.
grandmas unsulphured molasses and alaskan fish emulsion.,most bang for the buck and i dont have to worry about ph.its closest to perfection ive ever had.every veg ive grown this way is rocketing away.the peat totally changed my.soil and it doesnt take as much as you think.it chemically loosens the bonds.i have a 2000square foot garden ive tilled by shovel for ten years now and peat is awesome.
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great-grandfather
eye of the storm
User ID: 368253
05-07-2017 05:28 PM

Posts: 23,267



Post: #47
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
LoP Guest  Wrote: (05-07-2017 12:45 AM)
Will you be planting your 4 legal marijuana plants as allowed by the new marijuana laws in Canada?

maybe next year.

i wish i knew him, i wonder if i am like him, i wonder if i will ever know
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great-grandfather
eye of the storm
User ID: 368253
05-07-2017 05:33 PM

Posts: 23,267



Post: #48
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
LoP Guest  Wrote: (05-07-2017 02:18 AM)
thanks, GG. I'm sure it will be a big success.

Have you even thought about having a patch of dandelion greens? They are one of most nutrition dense items you can eat. I gathered some a couple of weeks ago and juiced them. It doesn't taste that great...but great nutrition...and I read, recently that they are less bitter if you harvest them before they flower.

One thing about them....they reseed themselves. The roots are very nutritious also.

.....im gonna go for taste Jhikpghf

asparagus
tomato
potato
lettuce
onion
garlic
kohl rabi
radishes
peas
beans
cukes
sweet peppers
habanero peppers
spaghetti squash
butternut squash
broccoli
french tarragon
basil
sage
mint
rosemary
raspberries
apples
plums
kiwi

i wish i knew him, i wonder if i am like him, i wonder if i will ever know
(This post was last modified: 05-07-2017 05:56 PM by great-grandfather.) Quote this message in a reply
great-grandfather
eye of the storm
User ID: 368253
05-07-2017 06:00 PM

Posts: 23,267



Post: #49
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
something robo  Wrote: (05-07-2017 04:14 AM)
hey guys.ive always been suckin st gardening but loved the hobby.i have east texas red and yellow clay.folks kept saying.lime it.well they was wrong.i added one bail of peat per 200sq ft of soil.my soil digs like butter now.i read 2000 page thread on organic cannabis gardening.took me two weeks.
grandmas unsulphured molasses and alaskan fish emulsion.,most bang for the buck and i dont have to worry about ph.its closest to perfection ive ever had.every veg ive grown this way is rocketing away.the peat totally changed my.soil and it doesnt take as much as you think.it chemically loosens the bonds.i have a 2000square foot garden ive tilled by shovel for ten years now and peat is awesome.




i wish i knew him, i wonder if i am like him, i wonder if i will ever know
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great-grandfather
eye of the storm
User ID: 368253
05-07-2017 11:52 PM

Posts: 23,267



Post: #50
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
this is NOT my asparagus, but for those who dont know what the mature asparagus fern looks like ..... i thought it would make a natural fence... apparently deer dont like to walk through asparagus ..... so i planted asparagus almost completely around the garden......

[Image: AlU0VFe.jpg]

[Image: eMtyeJ7.jpg]

i wish i knew him, i wonder if i am like him, i wonder if i will ever know
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 414320
05-08-2017 12:04 AM

 



Post: #51
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
Very cool. How long is the growing season?
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 400405
05-08-2017 12:09 AM

 



Post: #52
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
LoP Guest  Wrote: (05-08-2017 12:04 AM)
Very cool. How long is the growing season?

Aspargus in most cases take 2 years before they can be harvested, after that you can harvest them each year (April/may depending on climate ofcourse. They can stay alive as long as 20 years so they're a pretty awesome crop.
Not to mention delicious!

I love using them for natural fencing OP! That thought never came up in my mind, I may use that idea myself!
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great-grandfather
eye of the storm
User ID: 368253
05-08-2017 12:13 AM

Posts: 23,267



Post: #53
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
they start before most other vegetables and the ferns stay into the winter....

i started them from crowns ..... saves a year on harvesting ..... nothing this year, 20 % next year ....30 % or more following year .....then at least 15 years

i wish i knew him, i wonder if i am like him, i wonder if i will ever know
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 402407
05-08-2017 01:13 AM

 



Post: #54
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
asparagus is invasive so be watchful of its slow encroachment.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 396860
05-08-2017 04:21 AM

 



Post: #55
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
something robo  Wrote: (05-07-2017 04:14 AM)
hey guys.ive always been suckin st gardening but loved the hobby.i have east texas red and yellow clay.folks kept saying.lime it.well they was wrong.i added one bail of peat per 200sq ft of soil.my soil digs like butter now.i read 2000 page thread on organic cannabis gardening.took me two weeks.
grandmas unsulphured molasses and alaskan fish emulsion.,most bang for the buck and i dont have to worry about ph.its closest to perfection ive ever had.every veg ive grown this way is rocketing away.the peat totally changed my.soil and it doesnt take as much as you think.it chemically loosens the bonds.i have a 2000square foot garden ive tilled by shovel for ten years now and peat is awesome.
The ONLY way to bust up clay is river sand. That is a CHORE.

Clay looks like china plates under a microscope. The sand gets inbetween those clay plates. Eventually humis will build up.

Look at this video explaining soil composition. Most of the subsoil is clay and sand.
In fact, you can extract clay to make pots in this way.



http://www.bachmans.com/Garden-Care/divH...thClaySoil
Quote: Amending Clay Soil: Unfortunately, many of the other plants that we want to grow will either struggle or fail to survive in clay. So the next option is to make changes to the soil. If you opt to change and amend the soil, it is very important to understand that it will take lots and lots of the right type of amendments. Just adding a bag or two of sand or manure will only make the situation worse.

The key to amending clay soil is to amend a large area and use enough coarse sand and coarse organic matter. Avoid trying to change a small area. Plants will have a difficult time making the transition to the surrounding clay soil, effectively limiting their growth to the amended area. And again, remember not to work clay soils while they are wet. Two of the best amendments for clay soil are coarse sand and coarse organic matter such as compost. Coarse sand is also sometimes called builders’ sand. The particles are relatively large, especially when compared to the finer sands used for sandboxes and such. Finer sands may actually make your problem worse. There are lots of types of organic matter available for gardening but not all of them will help improve clay soil. It needs to be coarse. Avoid fine-textured material such as peat moss or the packaged manures. If possible, find a source for a coarse compost or aged manure. Check with your city to see if they have a compost site for leaves and such.

How much? And how? First, calculate the area you are amending. Length x Width = Square Feet. Ideally, you should use equal parts of coarse sand and coarse organic matter to amend the soil, but extra sand can be used if necessary. You will need to cover the area with a 3-4 inch layer of organic matter and a 3-4 inch layer of sand. Bagged products won’t be practical, since they usually hold a half cubic foot or less and would only cover a couple of square feet. Look for a source of bulk material. It will probably be measured by the cubic yard (27 cubic feet).

The general rule of thumb is that one cubic yard will cover approximately 100 square feet with 3 inches of material. One hundred square feet may sound like a lot of space, but that is only a 10’ by 10’ area. A mature tree’s roots can fill many times that area. First spread the organic matter over the area to be amended and work it into the top 6 inches of the soil. Next spread the sand over the clay/organic matter layer and mix it in. A tiller works well for this task. If you don’t own one, they can be rented. Check the pH and texture of any amended soil on a regular basis to see how it is changing. The organic matter will decay and seem to disappear. Since clay soils tend to be naturally alkaline and the decaying organic matter will slowly acidify, it will be important to have the pH tested to check its continued suitability for the plants you are growing.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 396860
05-08-2017 04:27 AM

 



Post: #56
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
To rapidly improve clay soil, you typically play rapeseed to deeply penetrate the awful hardpan in clay soil.

Then also plant buckwheat and till it under. That will add a lot of organic material as a green manure.


[/quote]
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 396860
05-08-2017 04:35 AM

 



Post: #57
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
What is hardpan? In poor soil, a farmer have not improved the soil, but dumped chemical fertilizer on it. Therefore the roots were shallow and never penetrated down deep. So a hard layer exists in the subsoil.

Then old spent farms were sold as suburban lots, which then grew lawns.



A gardener, dealing with that mess, is trying to heal the soil by double digging with a garden fork to bust it up, but that is nigh impossible with heavy clay soil. So you use green manure crops like rape and buckwheat to do it naturally.

Sometimes it is so bad, you need a real tractor to bust sod as even a rear tine tiller like a Troy-bilt has trouble.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 402407
05-08-2017 05:59 AM

 



Post: #58
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
yea sand is bad as this clay already has sand in it but was bound up.onc3 i added the peat.it totally changed its texture.i was shocked.before for 8 years it was like hardpan each time i busted it.once i added the peat.wow.about an inch thick or less.hand tilled by shovel.into it and my ph fell in line,weeds pulled out easier.plants grew faster and produced more.im now spacing my rows 4feet apart and 10 inches high shaped like hills or an ac sign wave.
the old trench is filled with leaves and the next year the dirt is moved over into the old trench.the old trench acts as a hardpan trough ,decaying the leaves and holding water.with a mound of soil over the top of it about 20inches from pan to top of hill.

i cut a slit down the middle of the rows for more even watering and then plant.

raised beds are big yielders but high demand water too.im going by natures rain alone,so my engineering has to be right or else.
molasses,you can.thank me later.tablespoon per gallon.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 402407
05-08-2017 06:13 AM

 



Post: #59
RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
i also use to use rabbit poo because its the best single manure fertilizer you can get.well i said im gonna bypass the rabbit and last year threw out rabbit feed in the garden.so i get alfalfa in the winter now.which just adds more benefit year round.almost my whole 3 acres is covered now from all the wildlife feeding off it.i found it 3/4 mile away at neighbors because the same deer travel there too.blame robo for east texas alfalfa infestation.lol
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 417373
05-08-2017 06:15 AM

 



Post: #60
banana RE: building the new garden .... on a budget ....
great-grandfather  Wrote: (05-07-2017 05:33 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (05-07-2017 02:18 AM)
thanks, GG. I'm sure it will be a big success.

Have you even thought about having a patch of dandelion greens? They are one of most nutrition dense items you can eat. I gathered some a couple of weeks ago and juiced them. It doesn't taste that great...but great nutrition...and I read, recently that they are less bitter if you harvest them before they flower.

One thing about them....they reseed themselves. The roots are very nutritious also.

.....im gonna go for taste Jhikpghf

asparagus
tomato
potato
lettuce
onion
garlic
kohl rabi
radishes
peas
beans
cukes
sweet peppers
habanero peppers
spaghetti squash
butternut squash
broccoli
french tarragon
basil
sage
mint
rosemary
raspberries
apples
plums
kiwi



ducks yeah Cheer
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