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World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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06-26-2017 07:10 AM

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Post: #31
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Advertisement
Asia’s sudden shift away from coal and toward renewable energy will have a global impact.

The sudden shift, years ahead of schedule, from coal toward renewables is remaking Asia’s energy economy – with repercussions to be felt across the world. The present – and future – does not look good for what, only a few years ago, seemed like a sure long-term bet: Coal.

“Solar is competing head to head with coal in India and winning… and in China coal use is declining, the solar market is booming. These are not temporary anomalies but rather seismic shifts,” said Nicole Ghio, senior campaign representative for the Sierra Club’s International Climate and Energy Campaign.

If Asia’s developing countries can grow using less coal and more clean energy, it gives hope not only to the global climate, but could herald a new era of development in the region at the heart of the global economy.



For years, China’s seemingly insatiable demand for coal kept prices high. China, along with India, was a rapidly growing country with huge demand for energy, and coal was the cheapest, time-tested way to provide electricity. It was, after all, coal that fueled the industrialization of Europe and North America; coal was reliable, and, at the time, cheap and plentiful. China, Indonesia, Australia, and the United States all had massive reserves and were planning or building ports to supply the transpacific market.

From 2002 to 2012, the global coal trade doubled, with the four largest Asian economies – Japan, South Korea, China, and India – accounting for the majority of imports. This was in line with a shift of energy consumption from Europe and North America to Asia, and, similarly, Asia becoming the world’s top emitter of greenhouse gases.

Few saw China’s sudden drop coming. It was not that long ago that people spoke of the country as opening a coal plant a week, negating any impact of ongoing clean energy shifts in Germany and the United States. In fact, as recently as 2013, China imported 341 million tonnes (Mt), or about $20 billion worth of coal. India was not too far behind, importing 210 Mt, with Japan and South Korea also accounting for a significant share.

In the world’s top two coal exporting nations – Australia and Indonesia – the coal boom was an economic godsend. Together, they accounted for 63 percent of traded coal in 2013, after years of rapidly expanded their mining sectors. In the United States, plans were made to develop coal export ports along the West Coast, though local opposition meant America never got to cash in on the coal boom.

In 2015, though, things dramatically changed. China’s coal imports plunged 30 percent, and fell even further last year. Now, plants are being closed and construction is being idled across the nation. But what really stunned observers was that India did not pick up the slack. There, solar is booming and already at cost parity with coal, and the industry is going through turmoil. Earlier this month, the government of India’s most populous, energy-hungry state, Uttar Pradesh, announced the cancellation of more than 7,000 MW of coal power plants.

“In India you’re seeing almost weekly news about coal projects being canceled, or already started projects being in distress,” said Lauri Myllyvirta, a China-based coal and air pollution expert for Greenpeace. “The trend has become more and more apparent.”

This has heavily impacted the chief export countries. Global sales from coal exports totaled $74.4 billion in 2016 – a 43.5 percent drop from 2012, when coal shipments were valued at $131.6 billion. Today, Australia’s economy is still feeling the impacts from the massive drop in exports to China, while in Indonesia, coal mines are now being abandoned in the chief mining region of East Kalimantan and causing serious environmental harm.

The Next Frontier – Southeast Asia

Today, the biggest investor in coal not is a country not many would expect – Japan. Despite its near complete lack of domestic resources, Japan has plans to build 49 coal plants, in part to ensure energy security in the light of the still uncertain return of nuclear power to the island nation.

more:
http://thediplomat.com/2017/06/asia-and-...l-of-coal/


If anyone can help level the playing field with dirty energy (esp.nuclear) technology-wise it will be Japan if their 20th century innovation is still strong..

Then the Germans will have to step up their game even more..
chuckle

I give coal another 5 years max

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Natura Naturans
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06-26-2017 07:19 AM

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Post: #32
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
The AC is pathetic, he doesn't want you to know that his home country Australia gets 88% of it's energy from COAL. That's right, and here is the ABC story about it:

Coal continues to supply around two-thirds of Australia's electricity generation despite an increase in renewable energy supply, according to figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Non-renewable sources, largely coal and gas, accounted for 88 per cent of Australian electricity generation in the 2014-15 financial year.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-12/co...th/7622028

“The highest activity a human being can attain is learning for understanding, because to understand is to be free.” --Baruch Spinoza
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LoP Guest
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06-26-2017 08:01 AM

 



Post: #33
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
OTEC projects around the world Cheer

Today, multiple exciting new OTEC developments are picking up worldwide. To keep track of these developments, the OTEC foundation initiated a project portal providing an overview of all relevant ongoing projects. The aim is to help you gain insight into OTEC and the market.

Each project will be included in the interactive map above. The red icons represent the OTEC projects and the grey represents the Seawater Air-conditioning (SWAC) projects. ... http://www.otecnews.org/otecprojects/
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Natura Naturans
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User ID: 415819
06-26-2017 08:15 AM

Posts: 10,366



Post: #34
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-26-2017 08:01 AM)
OTEC projects around the world Cheer

Today, multiple exciting new OTEC developments are picking up worldwide. To keep track of these developments, the OTEC foundation initiated a project portal providing an overview of all relevant ongoing projects. The aim is to help you gain insight into OTEC and the market.

Each project will be included in the interactive map above. The red icons represent the OTEC projects and the grey represents the Seawater Air-conditioning (SWAC) projects. ... http://www.otecnews.org/otecprojects/

Theoretically OTEC would not be expensive to run. Somehow they haven't made it work well on the Big Island. All they use the cold water for is shrimp.

“The highest activity a human being can attain is learning for understanding, because to understand is to be free.” --Baruch Spinoza
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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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06-26-2017 08:31 AM

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Post: #35
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Natura Naturans  Wrote: (06-26-2017 07:19 AM)
The AC is pathetic, he doesn't want you to know that his home country Australia gets 88% of it's energy from COAL. That's right, and here is the ABC story about it:

Coal continues to supply around two-thirds of Australia's electricity generation despite an increase in renewable energy supply, according to figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Non-renewable sources, largely coal and gas, accounted for 88 per cent of Australian electricity generation in the 2014-15 financial year.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-12/co...th/7622028

you know very well the people running this place are neoliberal scum like you that dismantled everything they could alternative energy-wise and re-instated all they could for the same filthy industry that pays you to post the utter garbage that you post here.

Hifuck

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06-26-2017 08:35 AM

 



Post: #36
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ  Wrote: (06-26-2017 08:31 AM)
Natura Naturans  Wrote: (06-26-2017 07:19 AM)
The AC is pathetic, he doesn't want you to know that his home country Australia gets 88% of it's energy from COAL. That's right, and here is the ABC story about it:

Coal continues to supply around two-thirds of Australia's electricity generation despite an increase in renewable energy supply, according to figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Non-renewable sources, largely coal and gas, accounted for 88 per cent of Australian electricity generation in the 2014-15 financial year.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-12/co...th/7622028

you know very well the people running this place are neoliberal scum like you that dismantled everything they could alternative energy-wise and re-instated all they could for the same filthy industry that pays you to post the utter garbage that you post here.

Hifuck

People running what place?

LOP?

Are you insane?
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LoP Guest
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06-26-2017 08:44 AM

 



Post: #37
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
I buy charcoal made from hardwood trees for grilling. And I didn't need to buy any this year because I have a lot left from a year and half ago when I ordered a pallet of bags. I keep a lot as part of my emergency stores, at least a years worth. It's kept in climate controlled warehouse of mine, so it will store well for a long time. I charcoal grill a lot, year round.
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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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06-27-2017 06:42 PM

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Post: #38
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Quote:World's Biggest Coal Company Closes 37 Mines as Solar Prices Plummet

The rapid growth in renewable energy continues to put a dent in the demand for coal.

Coal India, the world's biggest coal mining company and producer of 82 percent of the country's coal, announced the closure of 37 mines that are financially "unviable."

The sites make up roughly nine percent of the total mines operated by Coal India. The company is expected save Rs 800 crore ($124 million) from the closures.

India's energy market is undergoing a rapid transformation as it moves away from fossil fuels. Last month, the country cancelled plans to build nearly 14 gigawatts of coal-fired power stations.

Notably, solar has been cheaper than coal-based electricity in India for the past several months. According to Quartz:

"At an auction for 500 megawatt (MW) of capacity at the park on May 12, the state-run Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) managed to discover a record-low tariff of Rs 2.44 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The previous low was two days before that when tariffs hit Rs 2.62 per kWh during auctions for another phase of Bhadla solar park.

"The country's largest power company, NTPC, sells electricity from its coal-based generation units at a princely Rs 3.20 per kWh."

The National Thermal Power Corporation of India said that the country currently hosts a solar power capacity of 845 megawatts, after the recent addition of a 225 megawatt solar farm, the Mandsaur Solar Power Project.

"India's solar sector has received heavy international investment, and the plummeting price of solar electricity has increased pressure on fossil fuel companies in the country," as The Independent reported. "The government has announced it will not build any more coal plants after 2022 and predicts renewables will generate 57 percent of its power by 2027—a pledge far outstripping its commitment in the Paris climate change agreement."

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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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06-30-2017 08:50 AM

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Post: #39
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-05-2017 08:46 AM

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Post: #40
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Summary
  • We're seeing big price declines in fossil fuels.
  • Technology is the hero -- or culprit, depending on your point of view.
  • EVs will be the death knell for oil.
  • The move away from fossil fuels: Is it just in time?
  • Here are three clean energy stocks to consider.




In January, Exxon Mobil (XOM) wrote $2 billion off the value of its U.S. natural gas fields. Then, in February, the company wiped 3.3 billion barrels of oil off its books. Exxon Mobil is not alone. As of mid-2016, oil and gas companies wrote off over $185 billion off the value of their fossil fuel reserves.

Big price declines in fossil fuels

Not too long ago, investors (myself included), thought some of the best companies to invest in were those which controlled huge amounts of coal, oil, or gas. After all, a growing, energy-hungry world needs increasing amounts of these fossil fuels. Right?

And how well did that strategy work out?

Well... Peabody (BTU), the U.S.'s largest coal producer, went bankrupt. Canadian Oil Sands (OTCQX:COSWF), with its massive oil sand holdings, failed. Chesapeake Energy (CHK) has extensive natural gas acreage yet saw its stock fall 90%.

In retrospect, investing in energy companies which control large amounts of coal, oil, and gas was a terrible strategy. Only a few years ago, with Peak Oil thinking in vogue, who would've guessed?

Today, all three major fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- are priced below their 2009 Great Recession lows. This is especially surprising considering the huge central bank fueled monetary supply expansions since 2007. (Wasn't that was supposed to be inflationary?)

[Image: 326389-14989338455576904.jpg]
Peabody and other coal company bankruptcies show that renewables are killing coal in the U.S., China, India, and elsewhere. In a touch of irony some coal plants are being resurrected as solar farms. (I guess they figure much of the infrastructure can be recycled and there are likely very few other buyers for old coal power facilities.)

more:
https://seekingalpha.com/article/4085441...ets?page=2

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LoP Guest
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07-05-2017 12:08 PM

 



Post: #41
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Once batteries reach $100 per kWh everything will change.
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07-05-2017 12:11 PM

 



Post: #42
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-26-2017 08:35 AM)
spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ  Wrote: (06-26-2017 08:31 AM)
you know very well the people running this place are neoliberal scum like you that dismantled everything they could alternative energy-wise and re-instated all they could for the same filthy industry that pays you to post the utter garbage that you post here.

Hifuck



Are you insane?

I'm pretty sure you are.. yeah3
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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-06-2017 07:30 AM

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Post: #43
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
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Hopes that the world’s huge carbon emissions might not drive temperatures up to dangerous levels have been dashed by new research.

The work shows that temperature rises measured over recent decades do not fully reflect the global warming already in the pipeline and that the ultimate heating of the planet could be even worse than feared.

How much global temperatures rise for a certain level of carbon emissions is called climate sensitivity and is seen as the single most important measure of climate change. Computer models have long indicated a high level of sensitivity, up to 4.5C for a doubling of CO2 in the atmosphere.

However in recent years estimates of climate sensitivity based on historical temperature records from the past century or so have suggested the response might be no more than 3C. This would mean the planet could be kept safe with lower cuts in emissions, which are easier to achieve.

But the new work, using both models and paleoclimate data from warming periods in the Earth’s past, shows that the historical temperature measurements do not reveal the slow heating of the planet’s oceans that takes place for decades or centuries after CO2 has been added to the atmosphere.

“The hope was that climate sensitivity was lower and the Earth is not going to warm as much,” said Cristian Proistosescu, at Harvard University in the US, who led the new research. “There was this wave of optimism.”

The new research, published in the journal Science Advances, has ended that. “The worrisome part is that all the models show there is an amplification of the amount of warming in the future,” he said. The situation might be even worse, as Proistosescu’s work shows climate sensitivity could be as high as 6C.

Prof Bill Collins, at the University of Reading, UK, and not part of the new research, said: “Some have suggested that we might be lucky and avoid dangerous climate change without taking determined action if the climate is not very sensitive to CO2 emissions. This work provides new evidence that that chance is remote.” He said greater long term warming had implications for melting of the world’s ice sheets and the rise of sea levels that already threatens many coastal cities.


more:
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/...w-research

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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-06-2017 07:34 AM

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Post: #44
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Volvo Cars announced Wednesday that every car it launches from 2019 will have an electric motor, marking a "historic end" to the internal combustion engine.

This makes Volvo the first traditional carmaker to fully embrace electrification.

"This is a clear commitment towards reducing our carbon footprint as well as contributing to better air quality in our cities," Håkan Samuelsson, president and chief executive, said. He then stated goals of selling 1 million electrified cars by 2025.

The company will still produce older Volvos with pure combustion engines after 2019, but its latest move signals its eventual phasing out conventional gas guzzlers. As the New York Times noted, other major car manufacturers have introduced EVs or hybrids to their line but none have entirely ditched making new cars powered solely by gasoline or diesel fuel.

"This is about the customer," Samuelsson added. "People increasingly demand electrified cars and we want to respond to our customers' current and future needs."



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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-08-2017 03:50 AM

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Post: #45
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Quote:The Connecticut Green Bank, the nation’s first, has generated an average of $6 of private investment in clean-energy products for every public dollar, leading to the creation of nearly 13,000 jobs since 2011. In total, it has put approximately $1 billion into play behind sustainable energy production, financed more than 215 megawatts of clean power across more than 20,000 projects, and reduced CO2 emissions by more than 2.6 million tons. Last year, for example, the bank financed the installation of solar panels on the roof of a 250,000 square-foot family-owned manufacturing business – saving the business more than $30,000 a year in energy costs and dramatically reducing its carbon output. Imagine the benefits to our economy and our climate if businesses across the country had access to the same resource.

The green banks of other states have seen similar successes. New York’s green bank is on pace to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 5.4 million metric tons over the next 19 years – the equivalent of taking 60,000 cars off the road. Loans from California’s new Lending for Energy and Environmental Needs Center were used last year to retrofit streetlights with LED technology in Huntington Beach, which will save businesses and residents up to $14 million over the next 20 years.

Why do we need a National Green Bank? The single greatest barrier for state green bank growth is a lack of access to capital. Clean-energy and energy-efficiency technologies are still fairly new to the market, and a lack of large-scale financing models for these technologies creates uncertainty for lenders. That’s where a National Green Bank comes into play.

Under our proposal, financing support – provided by the National Green Bank – will come in the form of loans, loan guarantees, debt securitization, insurance, and other forms of risk management. To help scale up a clean-energy economy, green banks provide more favorable terms to eligible institutions, including lower interest rates and a lower cost of debt.

Climate change will likely prove the defining economic and social challenge of the century. Too much hangs in the balance to take a “do nothing” approach to combating it. Creating a National Green Bank gives us a chance to reclaim our nation’s leadership in renewable energy and create a cleaner, brighter future for our children.

more:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/594b...254f3a5bf0

Quote:In 2016, jobs in the United States solar industry increased nearly 17 times faster than the rate of the overall economy. This was part of a global trend of jobs growing in renewable energy.


The data shows it: We don’t have to choose between good jobs and the future of our planet. A new report released by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) reveals that solar jobs in the US (and around the world) are expanding rapidly.

As of November 2016, the American solar industry employed 260,077 workers – an increase of 24.5 percent from 2015. When you crunch the numbers, that means the solar industry is growing just shy of 17 times faster than the American economy as a whole. That’s incredible progress.
Code:
In 2012, renewables employed 5.7 million people worldwide. In 2016, it was up to almost 10 million people! Retweet if you have #ClimateHope. pic.twitter.com/m3blDovb5A
— Climate Reality (@ClimateReality) June 7, 2017
So in what areas of the industry are these jobs? The lion’s share (241,900) were in solar photovoltaic (PV). According to IRENA, the worldwide growth in solar PV jobs had to do with “declining costs and supportive policy frameworks in several countries around the world [that] led to a record year for solar in 2016.”
In addition to photovoltaic, an additional 13,000 American solar jobs were in solar heating and cooling, and the remaining 5,200 were in concentrated solar power (CSP).

In terms of job function, more than half of all solar jobs in the US were in installation. Another 15 percent were in manufacturing, with 13 percent in project development, 12 percent in sales and distribution, and a final 6 percent in other areas, including research and development.

It’s important to remember: Not only is the solar industry booming – but the jobs pay well, too. As costs for materials continue to drop, solar jobs remain a well-compensated area for blue-collar workers. Bryan Birsic, CEO of Wunder Capital, said, "It seems to be one of the few areas of high-paying, blue-collar jobs – and you don't have to learn to code.”

Another sign of improvement? The solar labor force is becoming more diverse, with the number of women workers at 28 percent in 2016, up from 19 percent from 2013. This means more women have jobs in solar than in the conventional energy industry, although women in solar still lag behind their representative 47 percent of the US economy.

A RENEWABLE FUTURE
Solar isn’t the only thriving industry in the US economy right now – the wind industry put about 102,500 people to work in 2016. In fact, wind turbine technician is the single fastest growing occupation in the United States. IRENA projects the industry will grow to 147,000 jobs by 2020.

more:
https://www.climaterealityproject.org/bl...us-economy

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