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World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
NNnli
lop guest
User ID: 410039
07-08-2017 07:01 PM

 



Post: #61
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
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LoP Guest  Wrote: (07-08-2017 04:46 PM)
The UK has pledged to shut all coal fired power stations by 2025.

Wind farms have caused the electric price to double in ten years in the UK:

During the summer of 2011 great price increases decided by the UK "big six" power companies almost doubled the average household bill from £740 in 2006 to £1,345.

The British government for some time has tried to put the blame for the hike in utility prices on the energy companies that provide consumers with gas and electricity, saying that they did not act competitively with each other but arranged prices they all agreed on.

But now that argument has become difficult to defend. It's become clear that consumers are simply footing the bill for the people in power's desire to be "saviours of the planet", and by blaming the energy suppliers they try to cover up their responsibility.
Power lines

The moribund Kyoto agreement to cut carbon emissions "to stop global warming", which has not been implemented in any part in the world except Europe, Canada and New Zealand having therefore little hope of "global" impact on the climate but having a potentially enormous economic impact on the countries implementing it, has its staunchest supporter in the European Union.

The EU's commitment to the Kyoto Protocol led in 2001 to a directive establishing that by 2010 the member states had to derive as much as 22.1% , over a fifth, of their electricity consumption from renewable sources.

As a result, in the UK Tony Blair's Labour government introduced in 2002 the Renewable Obligations Order. This system obliges companies supplying electricity to purchase an annually increasing proportion of their electricity from so-called green or renewable (non-fossil) sources. This means they have to pay inflated prices, which they pass on to their customers through their electricity bills.

http://www.britaingallery.com/british-li...prices.php
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 423818
07-08-2017 07:13 PM

 



Post: #62
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
NNnli  Wrote: (07-08-2017 07:01 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (07-08-2017 04:46 PM)
The UK has pledged to shut all coal fired power stations by 2025.

Wind farms have caused the electric price to double in ten years in the UK:

During the summer of 2011 great price increases decided by the UK "big six" power companies almost doubled the average household bill from £740 in 2006 to £1,345.

The British government for some time has tried to put the blame for the hike in utility prices on the energy companies that provide consumers with gas and electricity, saying that they did not act competitively with each other but arranged prices they all agreed on.

But now that argument has become difficult to defend. It's become clear that consumers are simply footing the bill for the people in power's desire to be "saviours of the planet", and by blaming the energy suppliers they try to cover up their responsibility.
Power lines

The moribund Kyoto agreement to cut carbon emissions "to stop global warming", which has not been implemented in any part in the world except Europe, Canada and New Zealand having therefore little hope of "global" impact on the climate but having a potentially enormous economic impact on the countries implementing it, has its staunchest supporter in the European Union.

The EU's commitment to the Kyoto Protocol led in 2001 to a directive establishing that by 2010 the member states had to derive as much as 22.1% , over a fifth, of their electricity consumption from renewable sources.

As a result, in the UK Tony Blair's Labour government introduced in 2002 the Renewable Obligations Order. This system obliges companies supplying electricity to purchase an annually increasing proportion of their electricity from so-called green or renewable (non-fossil) sources. This means they have to pay inflated prices, which they pass on to their customers through their electricity bills.

http://www.britaingallery.com/british-li...prices.php

Well for a start, there was very little wind capacity added by 2011, something like 6GW that has doubled by 2015 when wind had added £18 to the average UK bill. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/...an-reality oh, if you are having problems working it out £1345-£740 is £605 not £18

Lmao
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 412093
07-08-2017 07:21 PM

 



Post: #63
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Actually, coal production WAS on a drastic decline when your Obama declared war on it 8 years ago, and invested in shovel ready jobs, and "clean" energy (Solyndra?). But the new administration has invested in ALL energy options, and you will see an increase of coal production.
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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-08-2017 10:32 PM

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Post: #64
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
'Talk Is Cheap': G20 Told to End Public Subsidy of All Dirty Fuels by 2020
New report reveals that public financing by wealthiest governments belies stated commitments to Paris climate goals


Extreme weather trends continue. CO2 emissions remain above the safe threshold. And President Donald Trump's decision to ditch the Paris climate pact underscores the need for other world leaders to live up to their promises to uphold the accord.

But a new report by a group of environmental advocacy organizations presents a sobering finding: G20 governments are bankrolling fossil fuel projects big time. In fact, they're pouring four times more public finance into fossil fuels than they are into clean energy projects.

more:
https://www.commondreams.org/news/2017/0...fuels-2020

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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-10-2017 10:34 AM

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Post: #65
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
The world might be heading for an oil supply shortage following a steep drop in investments and a lack of fresh conventional discoveries, Saudi Aramco's chief executive said on Monday.

Unconventional shale oil and alternative energy resources are an important factor to help meet future demand but it is premature to assume that they can be developed quickly to replace oil and gas, Amin Nasser told a conference in Istanbul.

"If we look at the long-term situation of oil supplies, for example, the picture is becoming increasingly worrying," Nasser said.

"Financial investors are shying away from making much needed large investments in oil exploration, long-term development and the related infrastructure. Investments in smaller increments such as shale oil will just not cut it," Nasser said.

About $1 trillion in investments have already been lost since a decline in oil prices from 2014. Studies show that 20 million barrels per day of new production will be needed to meet demand growth and offset natural decline of developed fields over the next five years, he said.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-aramco...SKBN19V0KR


Quote:Prodded in part by the utilities’ campaign, nearly every state in the country is engaged in a review of its solar energy policies. Since 2013, Hawaii, Nevada, Arizona, Maine and Indiana have decided to phase out net metering, crippling programs that spurred explosive growth in the rooftop solar market. (Nevada recently reversed its decision.)

Many more states are considering new or higher fees on solar customers.

“We believe it is important to balance the needs of all customers,” Jeffrey Ostermayer of the Edison Electric Institute, the most prominent utility lobbying group, said in a statement.

The same group of investor-owned utilities is now poised to sway solar policy at the federal level. Brian McCormack, a former top executive at the Edison institute, is Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s chief of staff. The Energy Department did not make Mr. McCormack available for an interview.

In April, Mr. Perry ordered an examination of how renewable energy may be hurting conventional sources like coal, oil and natural gas, a study that environmentalists worry could upend federal policies that have fostered the rapid spread of solar and wind power.

Charged with spearheading the study, due this summer, is Mr. McCormack.

“There’s no doubt these utilities are out to kill rooftop solar, and they’re succeeding,” said David Pomerantz, executive director of the Energy and Policy Institute, a renewable energy advocacy group. “They’re now driving the agenda.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/08/clima...bying.html

New guidelines being presented to the G20 this weekend will change the way individuals, companies, investors and regulators manage the financial risks of climate change. These risks include physical events, such as changing weather patterns and natural disasters, as well as new technologies and regulations.

As big investors adopt the guidelines, the companies in their portfolios will be pressured to report on climate change. This will make it easier for investors of all kinds to understand the impacts of climate change on their portfolios, and to assess new opportunities, such as new products and services that will be required and developed.

Companies like BHP have already begun reporting on how climate change will affect their businesses. But, until now, corporate disclosure on climate change has been patchy, shallow and not always financially relevant.

The new guidelines will create a common language for talking about climate change as a financial risk. This will drive more detailed reporting on how climate change is impacting investment portfolios, investment decisions, financial performance and strategies to manage the risk.

[Image: file-20170707-26461-1t7u9do.png]

https://theconversation.com/the-g20s-new...ange-80612

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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-15-2017 06:46 PM

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Post: #66
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
The world’s biggest oil producers are starting to take electric vehicles seriously as a long-term threat.

OPEC quintupled its forecast for sales of plug-in EVs, and oil producers from Exxon Mobil Corp. to BP Plc also revised up their outlooks in the past year, according to a study by Bloomberg New Energy Finance released on Friday. The London-based researcher expects those cars to reduce oil demand 8 million barrels by 2040, more than the current combined production of Iran and Iraq.

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more:
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/...car-demand
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Old Whatshisname staff
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07-15-2017 07:59 PM

Posts: 14,439



Post: #67
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
The Navajo Generating Station (NGS) in Page, AZ, is closing in 2019, as is the Peabody Kayenta coal mine, whose total output feeds NGS in northern Arizona. The majority shareholders quoted the lower cost of natural gas ($32/MW-hr) compared to coal ($38/MW-hr).

This will seriously impact the Navajo nation, as a large portion of the tribe's income comes from lease payments, fees, and wages to many tribal members.

Fighting ignorance -- one ignoramus at a time.
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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-16-2017 06:15 AM

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Post: #68
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Old Whatshisname  Wrote: (07-15-2017 07:59 PM)
The Navajo Generating Station (NGS) in Page, AZ, is closing in 2019, as is the Peabody Kayenta coal mine, whose total output feeds NGS in northern Arizona. The majority shareholders quoted the lower cost of natural gas ($32/MW-hr) compared to coal ($38/MW-hr).

This will seriously impact the Navajo nation, as a large portion of the tribe's income comes from lease payments, fees, and wages to many tribal members.

It seem they are branching out into renewables and have been for quite sometime.. sounds like they will get the short end of the stick regardless.


Quote:Despite the name, there is little that is “Navajo” about NGS. The Nation has almost no control over its fate and the plant fails to reflect Navajo culture or values. However, closing the plant provides little justice for the Nation – environmental or otherwise. Instead, closing NGS becomes yet another example of placing Indigenous people into hardship for the benefit of non-Natives.

While NGS took root on the Navajo Nation, its main benefactors have always been non-Native businesses and families in the Southwest. When it closes, only the Navajo Nation will suffer.

In the 1960’s, the Navajo Nation’s first attorney, Norman Little, persuaded the council to support hydroelectric dams with the aim of providing water and power to the city of Phoenix. However, when those dams became politically contentious, the Department of Interior and regional utility operators, including SRP, abandoned the projects and settled on building a coal-fired power plant instead.

By the late 1960’s, members of the Navajo Tribal Council hoped to develop coal resources in the belief that nuclear power would eventually make coal obsolete. The council never envisioned a permanent coal economy: they saw coal as an initial step toward a more diversified economy. The Navajo Nation agreed to build NGS and over the years, council members have followed the coal agenda as it if were their own. Fifty years later, the Nation has become dependent.

Today, the same outside forces that took water from the Navajo Nation while simultaneously introducing a coal economy are at work again. That force is resource colonialism: the purchase of raw goods on reservation lands under unfavorable conditions at a fraction of their eventual wealth. But as coal becomes less profitable for SRP, the Navajo reservation is left to figure out what to do next, now that big business has no more use for the Nation.

Navajo and non-Native environmental groups have urged lawmakers to reject the “replacement” lease and have demanded the immediate closure of NGS. They have also called for a transition from coal to renewable energy technologies. However, this would be a terrible shock to the Navajo Nation budget and for hundreds of workers at the plant and the Kayenta coal mine, which feeds NGS.

If the Navajo Nation simply replaced coal with sustainable alternatives, decades from now the reservation could find itself in yet another boom and bust cycle of energy production while remaining the most marginal and exploited actor in the commodity chain. Or perhaps the Navajo Nation might embrace solar and coal simultaneously, continuing dependency and failing to reduce carbon emissions.
http://www.hcn.org/articles/analysis-tri...ajo-nation


Navajo Nation Finishes its First Solar Project
http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2017/0...oject.html

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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-17-2017 06:28 AM

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Post: #69
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Seven charts show why the IEA thinks coal investment has already peaked

Global investment in coal-fired power plants is set to decline “dramatically” after passing an all-time high during the past several years, says the International Energy Agency (IEA).

That’s one of the most striking messages from World Energy Investment 2017, published today. The report, now in its second year, offers a comprehensive picture of energy investment from fossil-fuel extraction through to transport, energy efficiency and power networks.

The IEA report is not only backwards looking, reporting money already invested. It also offers a glimpse of forthcoming trends, by reporting the value of decisions taken to invest in future.

Global investment in coal-fired power plants is set to decline “dramatically” after passing an all-time high during the past several years, says the International Energy Agency (IEA).

That’s one of the most striking messages from World Energy Investment 2017, published today. The report, now in its second year, offers a comprehensive picture of energy investment from fossil-fuel extraction through to transport, energy efficiency and power networks.

The IEA report is not only backwards looking, reporting money already invested. It also offers a glimpse of forthcoming trends, by reporting the value of decisions taken to invest in future.

Overall, investment fell again last year, as the oil-and-gas sector continued to cut back in response to low prices. Steady investment in renewables, along with falling costs, saw 50% more capacity being added in 2016 than in 2011. But gains for low-carbon wind and solar are being offset by declines in hydro and nuclear.

Carbon Brief has seven charts with the key messages from this year’s energy investment report.

Fossil fall
For the second year running, global investment in new energy supplies fell steeply, the IEA report says. This decline was mainly due to the oil-and-gas sector, where investment has fallen 44% in two years on the back of the collapse in oil prices.

These cuts have seen fossil fuels’ share of investments in new energy supplies fall below 60% for the first time, as the chart below shows.

[Image: Screen-Shot-2017-07-10-at-11.15.50.png]

more:
https://www.carbonbrief.org/seven-charts...ady-peaked



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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-17-2017 07:08 AM

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Post: #70
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
JUNE 10, 2017 | 6:00 AM
THE SOLAR INDUSTRY IS CREATING JOBS NEARLY 17 TIMES FASTER THAN THE REST OF THE US ECONOMY

In 2016, jobs in the United States solar industry increased nearly 17 times faster than the rate of the overall economy. This was part of a global trend of jobs growing in renewable energy.



The data shows it: We don’t have to choose between good jobs and the future of our planet. A new report released by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) reveals that solar jobs in the US (and around the world) are expanding rapidly.

As of November 2016, the American solar industry employed 260,077 workers – an increase of 24.5 percent from 2015. When you crunch the numbers, that means the solar industry is growing just shy of 17 times faster than the American economy as a whole. That’s incredible progress.

In 2012, renewables employed 5.7 million people worldwide. In 2016, it was up to almost 10 million people! Retweet if you have #ClimateHope. pic.twitter.com/m3blDovb5A

more
https://www.climaterealityproject.org/bl...us-economy


In his campaign, Donald Trump seized on that resonance with an odd kind of fervor, using miners as props in political rallies and promising, again and again, to put them back to work. He has managed to make the fate of coal miners a synecdoche for the fate of the white working class writ large.

What’s distasteful about the whole thing is that Trump has won the allegiance of coal communities by reinforcing and amplifying the same lie they have been told by right-wing media and politicians for years: that Obama’s pollution regulations on the US coal industry are responsible for its (and their) recent woes.

It’s not true. And the information that shows it’s not true is easily available, so they should know it’s not true. Many probably do. But it is a convenient lie, one that riles up a reliable political constituency and serves as a bludgeon in the culture war.

It is not, however, a benign lie. The struggles facing Appalachian coal country are very real. Unemployment, ill health, drug addiction, stress, and depression have ravaged the region. Now thousands of retired coal miners are in danger of losing their pensions and health care benefits.

(Guess who has refused to schedule a vote on a bill that would address that crisis? One Addison Mitchell McConnell, Republican leader of the Senate. Guess who had a plan to funnel $30 billion to suffering Appalachian communities? One Hillary Rodham Clinton, the competent, boring president America might have had, if not for emails.)

It does people in the region no good to believe that coal jobs will come roaring back once pesky pollution regulations are overturned. It sets them up for more disappointment and wastes time and energy they could be devoting to finding a new and better future for their communities.

So let’s put this story to rest once and for all, with numbers.

more
https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environme...tions-coal

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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-17-2017 07:14 AM

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Post: #71
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Geothermal Could Put Thousands from Alberta’s Oil and Gas Sector Back to Work

Abandoned oil and gas wells in Alberta are on the rise — but where many see a growing liability, Alberta’s fledgling geothermal industry sees massive opportunity.

“We’ve got these old wells that we know are hot and we’re going to fill them with cement and walk away,” says Tim Davies, CEO of geothermal company Turkana. “It’s just stupid.”

There’s currently no permitting framework for geothermal in Alberta, leaving the renewable energy out of play.

“I own the well, I own the land and I own the oil. But I can’t own the heat,” Davies said. “There’s just no mechanism for that in place.”

“The oil business has drilled 400,000 wells in Alberta alone,” Alison Thompson, president of the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association, told DeSmog Canada. “They’ve already found all the hot water the province has.”

“The oil patch has those skills to get the most out of every well,” Thompson said, adding the workforce has been hamstrung by a lack of forward thinking policies.

more:
https://www.desmog.ca/2016/05/03/geother...-back-work

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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-21-2017 09:19 AM

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Post: #72
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-22-2017 12:01 PM

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Post: #73
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
Quote:“For years, coal and oil and gas have been Wyoming’s bedrock. 40% of U.S. coal is still produced in the state but the industry is in decline. 1,000 coal jobs have been lost here in the past few years. But now, wind energy is making its presence felt. Several large wind farms will soon be built in Wyoming.”




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DanfromtheHills
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07-22-2017 12:41 PM

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Post: #74
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record



19 Arabs, with boxcutters.
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spɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
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07-22-2017 01:29 PM

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Post: #75
RE: World Coal Production Just Had Its Biggest Drop on Record
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Virginia now has more jobs in the solar industry than the coal industry. Numbers from the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy show a 40% drop in the number of people working in the coal industry over the last five years. Henry Childress with the Virginia Coal and Energy Alliance says coal produces more energy with fewer employees.

“Coal will produce more jobs I think in the long term. But we’ve had to cut back because everyone feels like it’s not worth it to use coal anymore. And I feel that there will be a time when we will have to turn back to coal to meet the demand.”

For now, though, the solar industry has more employees in Virginia than the coal industry. That’s a dramatic shift for a state that has a long history with coal. Alexander Winn at the Solar Foundation says he’s hopeful some of those jobs might move from coal to solar.

“There are efforts to retrain some coal workers, and hopefully those will continue to grow as solar becomes an increasingly large employment sector in the Virginia energy industry.”

Most solar energy jobs are in installation, construction and manufacturing. Numbers from the Solar Foundation show that the industry grew by about 65% over the last year alone.

http://wvtf.org/post/first-time-history-...s-virginia

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