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Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 405784
06-18-2017 05:11 PM

 



Post: #1
beermug Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
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The LA Times is reporting that Fisher’s death was as a result of several factors, including sleep apnea, drug use and heart disease.

“My mom battled drug addiction and mental illness her entire life. She ultimately died of it. She was purposefully open in all of her work about the social stigmas surrounding these diseases.

“She talked about the shame that torments people and their families confronted by these diseases. I know my Mom, she’d want her death to encourage people to be open about their struggles. Seek help, fight for government funding for mental health programs. Shame and those social stigmas are the enemies of progress to solutions and ultimately a cure. Love you Momby.”

So we blame the government, as the demo's did away with the mental hospitals put them on the streets as homeless. Then blame Regan here in California. S977

http://people.com/movies/carrie-fisher-cause-of-death/

As the world turns.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 397519
06-18-2017 05:13 PM

 



Post: #2
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
/As the world burns
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Isabella
Registered User
User ID: 398165
06-18-2017 05:38 PM

Posts: 20,280



Post: #3
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-18-2017 05:11 PM)
The LA Times is reporting that Fisher’s death was as a result of several factors, including sleep apnea, drug use and heart disease.

“My mom battled drug addiction and mental illness her entire life. She ultimately died of it. She was purposefully open in all of her work about the social stigmas surrounding these diseases.

“She talked about the shame that torments people and their families confronted by these diseases. I know my Mom, she’d want her death to encourage people to be open about their struggles. Seek help, fight for government funding for mental health programs. Shame and those social stigmas are the enemies of progress to solutions and ultimately a cure. Love you Momby.”

So we blame the government, as the demo's did away with the mental hospitals put them on the streets as homeless. Then blame Regan here in California. S977

http://people.com/movies/carrie-fisher-cause-of-death/

As the world turns.

"Ronald Reagan and the Federal Deinstitutionalization of Mentally Ill Patients


The lack of institutional care of critically mentally ill patients in the United States has become a complicated problem that has resulted in victimization, homelessness, and incarceration of these individuals. In 1967, the State of California was one of the first states to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients when it passed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (Lyons, 1984). This act had a profoundly negative impact on the lives of the mentally ill. So, why would the Reagan Administration choose to end “the federal government’s role in providing services to the mentally ill” (Pan, 2013)?

Ronald Reagan, the 40th president of the United States, is well known for his fiscal policies that stimulated economic growth, cut inflation and pulled America out of a recession (Cannon, 2017). What Reagan is not readily known for is the long term effect of a law he repealed that essentially deinstitutionalized mentally ill patients at the federal level (Roberts, 2013). While some of his fiscal policies had a positive effect on the U.S. economy during the 1980s, his decision to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients had a much more deleterious effect on these patients, their communities, and the agencies that were left to contend with these individuals’ mental health issues (Honberg, 2015).

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) is the statute that repealed President Carter’s Mental Health Systems Act which was supposed to continue federal funding for mental health programs. Reagan gave the appearance of making a consequentialist ethical decision because he presented his repeal of OBRA as an action that would best serve American society and do more good than harm as a result. The OBRA gave mental patients a choice to seek treatment outside of a mental institution, an option to seek treatment at clinics at the state level, and the freedom to administer their own medication (PSY533, 2017) (Pan, 2013). However, Reagan was hasty in taking unsound advice to repeal OBRA because his real motive was to cut the federal budget (Roberts, 2013). He was a leader who “never exhibited any interest in the need for research or better treatment for serious mental illness” (Torrey, 2017).

To be an ethical leader, one must attempt to gather as much knowledge as possible when making decisions, especially if one has the power to affect so many lives (Toffler, 2009). The mentally ill are amongst the most vulnerable populations in society because most are unable to make sound decisions regarding their own care due to their mental state. The consequences of Reagan’s social policy can be measured by the fact that today one-third of the homeless population are suffering from severe mental illness which puts a burden on police departments, hospitals and the penal system which lack the training and resources to deal with psychiatric emergencies (Honberg, 2015). Reagan’s unethical choice to end federal funding for mental health programs was driven by the desire to cut the budget. As a result, he did much more harm than good (PSY533, 2017)."

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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 421788
06-18-2017 05:42 PM

 



Post: #4
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
Carrie's problem was drug addiction, not bipolar disorder, as she was haunted by all of the pain she caused others.

When off drugs, she was kind, considerate and loving.

On drugs, she was awful, and only got worse in her later years.

She also promoted ECT which only made her worse, and she behaved as if she had dementia in public.

A 55 year old woman shouldn't have to have 'minders' just to do a little shopping or take a walk. Carrie really was incapacitated by her fifties, which does not fit the bipolar criteria, as the illness actually improves over time.

It's a sad tale and yet, she is to blame for her behavior, as she chose to stay a major drug addict while so many tried to help her.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 421789
06-18-2017 05:45 PM

 



Post: #5
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
It's best for her daughter to believe that Carrie had an untreatable illness, because knowing that your mother put drugs over you, your family, and everyone else is heartbreaking.

So yeah, Billie, you mom was bipolar.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 334909
06-18-2017 05:47 PM

 



Post: #6
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
She saw who Darth Vader was.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 421789
06-18-2017 05:48 PM

 



Post: #7
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
Carrie said that bipolar only got worse with time ....well Carrie, if you're on HEROIN I guess it does....
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 421789
06-18-2017 05:59 PM

 



Post: #8
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
That lawsuit didn't help her case either, because after all, she was being held liable for the death of a 21 year old woman who was under her 'professional' care.

Carrie was being paid BIG BUCKS to get involved with a questionable rehab program and some poor girl died of a heroin overdose under this program.

Carrie fought that but in October (two months before she Carrie died) the judge ruled that she would stand trial.

Therefore, Carrie probably used drugs, threw in the towel, and said 'f*#k it.'

Many people are very angry with Carrie as she was coddled for YEARS and had been given ALL THE SUPPORT IN THE WORLD, and still, she used drugs.

Carrie could be wonderful, and that is the Carrie I'd like to remember however, she had hurt so many, including me, and that doesn't go away.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 421308
06-18-2017 06:19 PM

 



Post: #9
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
Too much force
Jhikpghf
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 405784
06-18-2017 07:00 PM

 



Post: #10
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
Isabella  Wrote: (06-18-2017 05:38 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-18-2017 05:11 PM)
The LA Times is reporting that Fisher’s death was as a result of several factors, including sleep apnea, drug use and heart disease.

“My mom battled drug addiction and mental illness her entire life. She ultimately died of it. She was purposefully open in all of her work about the social stigmas surrounding these diseases.

“She talked about the shame that torments people and their families confronted by these diseases. I know my Mom, she’d want her death to encourage people to be open about their struggles. Seek help, fight for government funding for mental health programs. Shame and those social stigmas are the enemies of progress to solutions and ultimately a cure. Love you Momby.”

So we blame the government, as the demo's did away with the mental
hospitals put them on the streets as homeless. Then blame Regan here in California.
S977

http://people.com/movies/carrie-fisher-cause-of-death/

As the world turns.

"Ronald Reagan and the Federal Deinstitutionalization of Mentally Ill Patients


The lack of institutional care of critically mentally ill patients in the United States has become a complicated problem that has resulted in victimization, homelessness, and incarceration of these individuals. In 1967, the State of California was one of the first states to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients when it passed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (Lyons, 1984). This act had a profoundly negative impact on the lives of the mentally ill. So, why would the Reagan Administration choose to end “the federal government’s role in providing services to the mentally ill” (Pan, 2013)?

Ronald Reagan, the 40th president of the United States, is well known for his fiscal policies that stimulated economic growth, cut inflation and pulled America out of a recession (Cannon, 2017). What Reagan is not readily known for is the long term effect of a law he repealed that essentially deinstitutionalized mentally ill patients at the federal level (Roberts, 2013). While some of his fiscal policies had a positive effect on the U.S. economy during the 1980s, his decision to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients had a much more deleterious effect on these patients, their communities, and the agencies that were left to contend with these individuals’ mental health issues (Honberg, 2015).

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) is the statute that repealed President Carter’s Mental Health Systems Act which was supposed to continue federal funding for mental health programs. Reagan gave the appearance of making a consequentialist ethical decision because he presented his repeal of OBRA as an action that would best serve American society and do more good than harm as a result. The OBRA gave mental patients a choice to seek treatment outside of a mental institution, an option to seek treatment at clinics at the state level, and the freedom to administer their own medication (PSY533, 2017) (Pan, 2013). However, Reagan was hasty in taking unsound advice to repeal OBRA because his real motive was to cut the federal budget (Roberts, 2013). He was a leader who “never exhibited any interest in the need for research or better treatment for serious mental illness” (Torrey, 2017).

To be an ethical leader, one must attempt to gather as much knowledge as possible when making decisions, especially if one has the power to affect so many lives (Toffler, 2009). The mentally ill are amongst the most vulnerable populations in society because most are unable to make sound decisions regarding their own care due to their mental state. The consequences of Reagan’s social policy can be measured by the fact that today one-third of the homeless population are suffering from severe mental illness which puts a burden on police departments, hospitals and the penal system which lack the training and resources to deal with psychiatric emergencies (Honberg, 2015). Reagan’s unethical choice to end federal funding for mental health programs was driven by the desire to cut the budget. As a result, he did much more harm than good (PSY533, 2017)."

Spearheaded by the New York Civil Liberties Union's (NYCLU) Mental Patients' Rights Project, the shuttered world of people confined because of mental illness and developmental disabilities was one of the next major enclaves targeted for legal action. Bruce Ennis, Director of the Project, was a prime participant in several landmark cases that became the highpoint of the civil rights movement for people with mental disabilities. In Wyatt v. Stickney (1972) and Wyatt v. Aderholt (1974), Ennis challenged the conditions of hospitalization for those with mental illness and developmental disabilities, leading to significant reductions in the institutions' populations; major increases in expenditures for mental health and rehabilitative services; improvement in psychologist-patient ratios; significant reductions in the abuse of patients; and the adoption of the then-innovative concept of specific treatment and rehabilitation plans for each individual. The principles argued for by Ennis, and included in the judge's final order, were subsequently adopted by 35 other states. Another significant result of the Wyatt litigation was the formation of the Mental Health Law Project (MHLP), now the Bazelon Center in Washington, DC.

https://www.aclu.org/other/aclu-history-...stitutions
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Mr ifnoc
Location: All of it
User ID: 411691
06-18-2017 07:17 PM

Posts: 7,221



Post: #11
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
Isabella  Wrote: (06-18-2017 05:38 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-18-2017 05:11 PM)
The LA Times is reporting that Fisher’s death was as a result of several factors, including sleep apnea, drug use and heart disease.

“My mom battled drug addiction and mental illness her entire life. She ultimately died of it. She was purposefully open in all of her work about the social stigmas surrounding these diseases.

“She talked about the shame that torments people and their families confronted by these diseases. I know my Mom, she’d want her death to encourage people to be open about their struggles. Seek help, fight for government funding for mental health programs. Shame and those social stigmas are the enemies of progress to solutions and ultimately a cure. Love you Momby.”

So we blame the government, as the demo's did away with the mental hospitals put them on the streets as homeless. Then blame Regan here in California. S977

http://people.com/movies/carrie-fisher-cause-of-death/

As the world turns.

"Ronald Reagan and the Federal Deinstitutionalization of Mentally Ill Patients


The lack of institutional care of critically mentally ill patients in the United States has become a complicated problem that has resulted in victimization, homelessness, and incarceration of these individuals. In 1967, the State of California was one of the first states to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients when it passed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (Lyons, 1984). This act had a profoundly negative impact on the lives of the mentally ill. So, why would the Reagan Administration choose to end “the federal government’s role in providing services to the mentally ill” (Pan, 2013)?

Ronald Reagan, the 40th president of the United States, is well known for his fiscal policies that stimulated economic growth, cut inflation and pulled America out of a recession (Cannon, 2017). What Reagan is not readily known for is the long term effect of a law he repealed that essentially deinstitutionalized mentally ill patients at the federal level (Roberts, 2013). While some of his fiscal policies had a positive effect on the U.S. economy during the 1980s, his decision to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients had a much more deleterious effect on these patients, their communities, and the agencies that were left to contend with these individuals’ mental health issues (Honberg, 2015).

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) is the statute that repealed President Carter’s Mental Health Systems Act which was supposed to continue federal funding for mental health programs. Reagan gave the appearance of making a consequentialist ethical decision because he presented his repeal of OBRA as an action that would best serve American society and do more good than harm as a result. The OBRA gave mental patients a choice to seek treatment outside of a mental institution, an option to seek treatment at clinics at the state level, and the freedom to administer their own medication (PSY533, 2017) (Pan, 2013). However, Reagan was hasty in taking unsound advice to repeal OBRA because his real motive was to cut the federal budget (Roberts, 2013). He was a leader who “never exhibited any interest in the need for research or better treatment for serious mental illness” (Torrey, 2017).

To be an ethical leader, one must attempt to gather as much knowledge as possible when making decisions, especially if one has the power to affect so many lives (Toffler, 2009). The mentally ill are amongst the most vulnerable populations in society because most are unable to make sound decisions regarding their own care due to their mental state. The consequences of Reagan’s social policy can be measured by the fact that today one-third of the homeless population are suffering from severe mental illness which puts a burden on police departments, hospitals and the penal system which lack the training and resources to deal with psychiatric emergencies (Honberg, 2015). Reagan’s unethical choice to end federal funding for mental health programs was driven by the desire to cut the budget. As a result, he did much more harm than good (PSY533, 2017)."
When the deeds done to the institutionalized are finally revealed to the masses. America, will go berseker!

People where buried by #s, experimented upon like labs rats, and murdered for the "sake of understanding", necessary risks to find "false cures", to made up diagnosis.

Rats!

Big Pharma took up where asylums like Gowanda left off, a changing of genocidal guards. That is all it has been.

If they don't get ya with electro shock therapeutic treatment. They will get you with alchemical explosion processes in the "medicine", deemed "legal".
Sheep, that is all we are to them.

There's a Newdawnrising Heartflowers


Rest in peace Galaxy.:( Candle

Spiddy said, 3/22/15: I generally plug my cerebral cortex into a vagina but I guess you're close enough Fred.
:)

"Hilderbeast" ,(hillderbeast), or any variation of, are belonging to me! ®©™ per Fork!:)

Pray for Uli <3
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Isabella
Registered User
User ID: 398165
06-18-2017 07:19 PM

Posts: 20,280



Post: #12
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-18-2017 07:00 PM)
Isabella  Wrote: (06-18-2017 05:38 PM)
"Ronald Reagan and the Federal Deinstitutionalization of Mentally Ill Patients


The lack of institutional care of critically mentally ill patients in the United States has become a complicated problem that has resulted in victimization, homelessness, and incarceration of these individuals. In 1967, the State of California was one of the first states to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients when it passed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (Lyons, 1984). This act had a profoundly negative impact on the lives of the mentally ill. So, why would the Reagan Administration choose to end “the federal government’s role in providing services to the mentally ill” (Pan, 2013)?

Ronald Reagan, the 40th president of the United States, is well known for his fiscal policies that stimulated economic growth, cut inflation and pulled America out of a recession (Cannon, 2017). What Reagan is not readily known for is the long term effect of a law he repealed that essentially deinstitutionalized mentally ill patients at the federal level (Roberts, 2013). While some of his fiscal policies had a positive effect on the U.S. economy during the 1980s, his decision to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients had a much more deleterious effect on these patients, their communities, and the agencies that were left to contend with these individuals’ mental health issues (Honberg, 2015).

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) is the statute that repealed President Carter’s Mental Health Systems Act which was supposed to continue federal funding for mental health programs. Reagan gave the appearance of making a consequentialist ethical decision because he presented his repeal of OBRA as an action that would best serve American society and do more good than harm as a result. The OBRA gave mental patients a choice to seek treatment outside of a mental institution, an option to seek treatment at clinics at the state level, and the freedom to administer their own medication (PSY533, 2017) (Pan, 2013). However, Reagan was hasty in taking unsound advice to repeal OBRA because his real motive was to cut the federal budget (Roberts, 2013). He was a leader who “never exhibited any interest in the need for research or better treatment for serious mental illness” (Torrey, 2017).

To be an ethical leader, one must attempt to gather as much knowledge as possible when making decisions, especially if one has the power to affect so many lives (Toffler, 2009). The mentally ill are amongst the most vulnerable populations in society because most are unable to make sound decisions regarding their own care due to their mental state. The consequences of Reagan’s social policy can be measured by the fact that today one-third of the homeless population are suffering from severe mental illness which puts a burden on police departments, hospitals and the penal system which lack the training and resources to deal with psychiatric emergencies (Honberg, 2015). Reagan’s unethical choice to end federal funding for mental health programs was driven by the desire to cut the budget. As a result, he did much more harm than good (PSY533, 2017)."

Spearheaded by the New York Civil Liberties Union's (NYCLU) Mental Patients' Rights Project, the shuttered world of people confined because of mental illness and developmental disabilities was one of the next major enclaves targeted for legal action. Bruce Ennis, Director of the Project, was a prime participant in several landmark cases that became the highpoint of the civil rights movement for people with mental disabilities. In Wyatt v. Stickney (1972) and Wyatt v. Aderholt (1974), Ennis challenged the conditions of hospitalization for those with mental illness and developmental disabilities, leading to significant reductions in the institutions' populations; major increases in expenditures for mental health and rehabilitative services; improvement in psychologist-patient ratios; significant reductions in the abuse of patients; and the adoption of the then-innovative concept of specific treatment and rehabilitation plans for each individual. The principles argued for by Ennis, and included in the judge's final order, were subsequently adopted by 35 other states. Another significant result of the Wyatt litigation was the formation of the Mental Health Law Project (MHLP), now the Bazelon Center in Washington, DC.

https://www.aclu.org/other/aclu-history-...stitutions

Thanks for that.
This was also in the early 70's ,the time line of "Willow Brook".
In my area which has a well known Psychiatric Hospital quite a few patients who have been discharged remain in the area and are/become homeless and also refuse to take their medications.
It has become a vicious cycle for some, getting arrested for whatever,sometimes the family tries to get a court order to enforce medications which is just abut impossible to do since they have the right to remain homeless by choice as long as they aren't at risk of hurting themselves or anyone else.
I'm definitely for civil rights for the mentally ill yet seeing how some live is heart wrenching and many have families that have just given up, which is also understandable
What's the solution?.

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Isabella
Registered User
User ID: 398165
06-18-2017 07:27 PM

Posts: 20,280



Post: #13
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
LoP Guest  Wrote: (06-18-2017 05:11 PM)
The LA Times is reporting that Fisher’s death was as a result of several factors, including sleep apnea, drug use and heart disease.

“My mom battled drug addiction and mental illness her entire life. She ultimately died of it. She was purposefully open in all of her work about the social stigmas surrounding these diseases.

“She talked about the shame that torments people and their families confronted by these diseases. I know my Mom, she’d want her death to encourage people to be open about their struggles. Seek help, fight for government funding for mental health programs. Shame and those social stigmas are the enemies of progress to solutions and ultimately a cure. Love you Momby.”

So we blame the government, as the demo's did away with the mental hospitals put them on the streets as homeless. Then blame Regan here in California. S977

http://people.com/movies/carrie-fisher-cause-of-death/

As the world turns.

I don't get how her daughter can even begin to compare her mother's addictions and the access that she had to the best doctors and rehabs to the average addicted person, no less the mentally ill who have addictions.
imo, the biggest problem was when the medical boards declared that addictions to alcohol and drugs are diseases, along with obesity.

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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 421793
06-18-2017 07:27 PM

 



Post: #14
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
Those mental wards kept many people their entire lives, drugged up, some sexually abused, sterilized either by drugs or by surgery, and tortured by brutal shock treatments.

Shock treatment was/is still used as a form of punishment in psych wards, mostly done to 'angry and uncooperative' women.

People can and do overcome mental illness, as bipolar disorder mellows out with age and most depression can be turned around in time.

Carrie was an 'angry and uncooperative ' woman at times. I know, I was there. It's no accident that her last decades were scarred by ECT.

ECT WAS THE TRADITIONAL PUNISHMENT FOR WILD, INDEPENDENT WOMEN.

Carrie aged beyond her years, slurred her speech, and behaved like she had dementia, all after she began her shock treatments.
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Isabella
Registered User
User ID: 398165
06-18-2017 07:33 PM

Posts: 20,280



Post: #15
RE: Carrie Fisher’s cause of death revealed by Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office
Mr ifnoc  Wrote: (06-18-2017 07:17 PM)
Isabella  Wrote: (06-18-2017 05:38 PM)
"Ronald Reagan and the Federal Deinstitutionalization of Mentally Ill Patients


The lack of institutional care of critically mentally ill patients in the United States has become a complicated problem that has resulted in victimization, homelessness, and incarceration of these individuals. In 1967, the State of California was one of the first states to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients when it passed the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (Lyons, 1984). This act had a profoundly negative impact on the lives of the mentally ill. So, why would the Reagan Administration choose to end “the federal government’s role in providing services to the mentally ill” (Pan, 2013)?

Ronald Reagan, the 40th president of the United States, is well known for his fiscal policies that stimulated economic growth, cut inflation and pulled America out of a recession (Cannon, 2017). What Reagan is not readily known for is the long term effect of a law he repealed that essentially deinstitutionalized mentally ill patients at the federal level (Roberts, 2013). While some of his fiscal policies had a positive effect on the U.S. economy during the 1980s, his decision to deinstitutionalize mentally ill patients had a much more deleterious effect on these patients, their communities, and the agencies that were left to contend with these individuals’ mental health issues (Honberg, 2015).

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) is the statute that repealed President Carter’s Mental Health Systems Act which was supposed to continue federal funding for mental health programs. Reagan gave the appearance of making a consequentialist ethical decision because he presented his repeal of OBRA as an action that would best serve American society and do more good than harm as a result. The OBRA gave mental patients a choice to seek treatment outside of a mental institution, an option to seek treatment at clinics at the state level, and the freedom to administer their own medication (PSY533, 2017) (Pan, 2013). However, Reagan was hasty in taking unsound advice to repeal OBRA because his real motive was to cut the federal budget (Roberts, 2013). He was a leader who “never exhibited any interest in the need for research or better treatment for serious mental illness” (Torrey, 2017).

To be an ethical leader, one must attempt to gather as much knowledge as possible when making decisions, especially if one has the power to affect so many lives (Toffler, 2009). The mentally ill are amongst the most vulnerable populations in society because most are unable to make sound decisions regarding their own care due to their mental state. The consequences of Reagan’s social policy can be measured by the fact that today one-third of the homeless population are suffering from severe mental illness which puts a burden on police departments, hospitals and the penal system which lack the training and resources to deal with psychiatric emergencies (Honberg, 2015). Reagan’s unethical choice to end federal funding for mental health programs was driven by the desire to cut the budget. As a result, he did much more harm than good (PSY533, 2017)."
When the deeds done to the institutionalized are finally revealed to the masses. America, will go berseker!

People where buried by #s, experimented upon like labs rats, and murdered for the "sake of understanding", necessary risks to find "false cures", to made up diagnosis.

Rats!

Big Pharma took up where asylums like Gowanda left off, a changing of genocidal guards. That is all it has been.

If they don't get ya with electro shock therapeutic treatment. They will get you with alchemical explosion processes in the "medicine", deemed "legal".
Sheep, that is all we are to them.

Included now in pharmaceutical web are the millions of average people who say that they suffer from anxiety/depression and are on a cocktail of drugs.

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