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Britain Before the Romans
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 426989
12-07-2017 01:04 PM

 



Post: #16
RE: Britain Before the Romans
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Crankgorilla  Wrote: (12-07-2017 12:37 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 12:25 PM)
And the British owe the Romans for civilising them I guess.

That's the basic line but the more one finds out, the more one then knows the Romans were expansionist murderers bent on stealing all they could. Absolute genocide, brutality and enslavement.

"As many as a million people (probably 1 in 5 of the Gauls) died, another million were enslaved, 300 clans were subjugated and 800 cities were destroyed during the Gallic Wars. The entire population of the city of Avaricum (Bourges) (40,000 in all) were slaughtered. Before Julius Caesar's campaign against the Helvetii (present-day Switzerland), the Helvetians had numbered 263,000, but afterwards only 100,000 remained, most of whom Caesar took as slaves."

- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaul

Roman Empire and later Roman Church mass murdered everyone who opposed them, and burnt their writings destroying their ruins, they made sure there was no traces left of former civilisation prior to their invasions and imperial usurpations followed only by genocide - the ultimate parasite in the old world, no wonder people compare it with the US military, as the new world order parasite that has been given the power to do all that across the world, albeit to a lesser extent then the Church did, but that is yet to be observed; it is in its infancy yet..
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Homer Simpson
Homer's University of GREATNESS
User ID: 425494
12-07-2017 01:29 PM

Posts: 38,323



Post: #17
RE: Britain Before the Romans
[Image: 91b3ce6cd88c4b5926d49bf3e03a23f1-boy-tha...ckly-4.jpg]

"Go with the flow, like a twig on the shoulders of a mighty stream" Del Griffith

[Image: Trump_Golf_Ball_Hillary_Smiley.gif?resize=480%2C270]
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TRUMP IS A GOD AMONG MEN
lop guest
User ID: 412280
12-07-2017 02:12 PM

 



Post: #18
RE: Britain Before the Romans
Crankgorilla  Wrote: (12-07-2017 12:14 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 12:11 PM)
I am asking what ruins monuments non latinised scripts. I know they existed but where is the evidence before the Romans. I mean where ere you guys during Greek days e.g? You are not in the bible or during that period, it's for a school project

Learn to read. It's all in there.

Actually, it is not there because it was almost impossible to have an advanced civilization when much of the land was covered by Ice or was too cold to support much human habitation.
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singing wilbury spider
Kraut! und Rüben!
User ID: 438978
12-07-2017 03:08 PM

Posts: 2,057



Post: #19
RE: Britain Before the Romans
Richard Eldritch  Wrote: (12-07-2017 12:43 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 11:46 AM)
Did the British/Europe have any civilisation before the Romans? How come they only have fake round stones as monuments ruins compared to the rest of the world? Even Africa beats them by a mile.

Oh yes There was a Druidic Empire that was centred on the Isle of Man ( Isle of Mannan) and strecthed to the mediteranian. Thats why the Romans Invaded, to cut of the Snakes head so to speak though unlike the rest of europe it took three attempts, 400 years and was never total. We had vast forrests and had wooden cities in the trees. Thats why there's not much left. Eygpt had stone and slaves we had wood and the earth godess.

the rest of europe? Kkqqcpdh
there is a lot of europe east of the rhine Jfhgrqsf

eta: which wasn't invaded because romans got lost in german forests

learning to fly, but I ain't got wings

[Image: G2FRDqb.gif]
(This post was last modified: 12-07-2017 03:10 PM by singing wilbury spider.) Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 438970
12-07-2017 03:22 PM

 



Post: #20
RE: Britain Before the Romans
singing wilbury spider  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:08 PM)
Richard Eldritch  Wrote: (12-07-2017 12:43 PM)
Oh yes There was a Druidic Empire that was centred on the Isle of Man ( Isle of Mannan) and strecthed to the mediteranian. Thats why the Romans Invaded, to cut of the Snakes head so to speak though unlike the rest of europe it took three attempts, 400 years and was never total. We had vast forrests and had wooden cities in the trees. Thats why there's not much left. Eygpt had stone and slaves we had wood and the earth godess.

the rest of europe? Kkqqcpdh
there is a lot of europe east of the rhine Jfhgrqsf

eta: which wasn't invaded because romans got lost in german forests

Don't worry about it. This thread was a troll thread from the beginning. Pre-Roman western Europe is full of fascinating cultures of Germanic and Celtic peoples that left a rich legacy.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 438981
12-07-2017 03:25 PM

 



Post: #21
RE: Britain Before the Romans
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:22 PM)
singing wilbury spider  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:08 PM)
the rest of europe? Kkqqcpdh
there is a lot of europe east of the rhine Jfhgrqsf

eta: which wasn't invaded because romans got lost in german forests

Don't worry about it. This thread was a troll thread from the beginning. Pre-Roman western Europe is full of fascinating cultures of Germanic and Celtic peoples that left a rich legacy.

its not a troll thread.

OP is asking a legitimate question, which you know the answer to - the celts and germanians were quite frankly on the same level of the african zulu before the romans came.
you just dont want to face it.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 438970
12-07-2017 03:28 PM

 



Post: #22
RE: Britain Before the Romans
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:25 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:22 PM)
Don't worry about it. This thread was a troll thread from the beginning. Pre-Roman western Europe is full of fascinating cultures of Germanic and Celtic peoples that left a rich legacy.

its not a troll thread.

OP is asking a legitimate question, which you know the answer to - the celts and germanians were quite frankly on the same level of the african zulu before the romans came.
you just dont want to face it.

You're OP, and you're a troll.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 438981
12-07-2017 03:30 PM

 



Post: #23
RE: Britain Before the Romans
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:28 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:25 PM)
its not a troll thread.

OP is asking a legitimate question, which you know the answer to - the celts and germanians were quite frankly on the same level of the african zulu before the romans came.
you just dont want to face it.

You're OP, and you're a troll.

Im not OP.
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singing wilbury spider
Kraut! und Rüben!
User ID: 438979
12-07-2017 03:42 PM

Posts: 2,057



Post: #24
RE: Britain Before the Romans
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:25 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:22 PM)
Don't worry about it. This thread was a troll thread from the beginning. Pre-Roman western Europe is full of fascinating cultures of Germanic and Celtic peoples that left a rich legacy.

its not a troll thread.

OP is asking a legitimate question, which you know the answer to - the celts and germanians were quite frankly on the same level of the african zulu before the romans came.
you just dont want to face it.

op wants somebody else to do his homework
he himself said so

and i'm just having fun slapping eldritch

learning to fly, but I ain't got wings

[Image: G2FRDqb.gif]
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Pinguu
Registered User
User ID: 438456
12-07-2017 04:07 PM

Posts: 17,343



Post: #25
RE: Britain Before the Romans
I just made this super easy for you....Click on the end Link....Its all there including how the British invented the first Quatze powered European monorail 2000 years before Christ..

The earliest traces of human habitation in the British Isles dates to about 700,000 years ago. These people were Homo Heidelbergensis, early humans who formed small, migratory groups of hunter-gatherers. They entered a Britain that was still firmly attached to the Continent by land following the end of a glacial period. As subsequent glacial periods ebbed and flowed, habitation faded and was re-established (it failed an estimated total of seven times).

Modern humans entered the British Isles around 30,000 years ago, although the ice eventually forced them out during a fresh advance. The most recent (and current) recolonisation occurred from about 12,000 BC onwards, a little over five thousand years before the last vestiges of the land bridge were submerged beneath the newly formed North Sea (the English Channel was formed much earlier). These people made up a culture with a relatively peaceful communal society, part of the Early Mesolithic Period (8300-6500 BC) and the Late Mesolithic Period (6500-4000 BC).

FeatureIt was Pytheas of Massalia who first recorded a name for the British Isles and Ireland. He was a Greek geographer and explorer who undertook a voyage of exploration around north-west Europe in the later years of the fourth century BC. During his trip he visited Britain and Ireland, which he collectively recorded as the Prettanic islands (with various spellings due to the translation from the original Greek, a name which covers all of the islands and also Ireland). Whether he coined the name himself or (more likely) gained it from the inhabitants is unknown. Later sources recorded the name of Alba for the British Isles, and Ere for Erin (Ireland) (see feature link, right, for a detailed exploration).

(Additional information by Edward Dawson, and from the Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Dr Chantal Conneller at the University of Manchester, Professor Nicky Milner at York University, and the Vale of Pickering Research Trust, and from External Links: Stonehenge, and Science.)

c.10,000 BC
FeatureThe most recent ice age is now fast fading in its intensity. As the ice recedes northwards, anatomically modern human hunter-gatherers reach Britain. Their arrival may be as much as the eighth such wave of settlement over the course of 700,000 years, but the first to last any appreciable time. By this date Aborigines have been in Australia for at least 55,000 years, greatly outlasting the human occupation of the British Isles.
FeatureThese early arrivals largely live in caves. Gough's Cave in Cheddar Gorge, Somerset, is one such site for these people. It is a fairly dry place that makes a good camp, with a good food supply from the land immediately outside. The Gorge channels animals such as horse and red deer quite close to the caves, and setting up ambushes to trap game as it goes past is relatively easy.
c.9500 BC
Until now a land bridge has connected Britain to Ireland, roughly from the south-eastern tip of the latter to south-western England. Trapped between this land bridge and the ice sheet to the north, the Irish Sea is filled by melt water that forms a vast lake. At this time, the land bridge is finally submerged beneath the salt water of the Atlantic. Animals, including the Giant Deer, and the hunter-gatherers who have followed them are now cut off. The land bridge makes a few more brief appearances as short-term fluctuations interfere with average sea levels before being swallowed up permanently.

http://www.historyfiles.co.uk/KingListsB...hKings.htm

LOP GUEST WROTE... like u should be burned and then smashed into concrete and swept away with a high speed wire brush into the winds of ignorance that you wallow in.

Wow....im in Love.
(This post was last modified: 12-07-2017 04:13 PM by Pinguu.) Quote this message in a reply
LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 438970
12-07-2017 04:15 PM

 



Post: #26
RE: Britain Before the Romans
singing wilbury spider  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:42 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:25 PM)
its not a troll thread.

OP is asking a legitimate question, which you know the answer to - the celts and germanians were quite frankly on the same level of the african zulu before the romans came.
you just dont want to face it.

op wants somebody else to do his homework
he himself said so

and i'm just having fun slapping eldritch

No, definitely a troll. When given a link to an excellent site about the British museum's celtic collection, https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute...z1O9u3piJg including the Battersea shield and the Snettisham Torc, he called them "Fake news...a few misdated Roman trinkets". You wouldn't do that if you were trying to do a homework project, you would say "thanks".

He's a troll, trying to get a reaction by implying non Roman Europe was primitive, but the facts don't support that version of history.
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singing wilbury spider
Kraut! und Rüben!
User ID: 438979
12-07-2017 04:29 PM

Posts: 2,057



Post: #27
RE: Britain Before the Romans
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 04:15 PM)
singing wilbury spider  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:42 PM)
op wants somebody else to do his homework
he himself said so

and i'm just having fun slapping eldritch

No, definitely a troll. When given a link to an excellent site about the British museum's celtic collection, https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute...z1O9u3piJg including the Battersea shield and the Snettisham Torc, he called them "Fake news...a few misdated Roman trinkets". You wouldn't do that if you were trying to do a homework project, you would say "thanks".

He's a troll, trying to get a reaction by implying non Roman Europe was primitive, but the facts don't support that version of history.

ok then
a troll confusing the roman invention of "civilisation"(=urban lifestyle) with culture

learning to fly, but I ain't got wings

[Image: G2FRDqb.gif]
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Dr P
lop guest
User ID: 304026
12-07-2017 04:45 PM

 



Post: #28
RE: Britain Before the Romans
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:25 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 03:22 PM)
Don't worry about it. This thread was a troll thread from the beginning. Pre-Roman western Europe is full of fascinating cultures of Germanic and Celtic peoples that left a rich legacy.

its not a troll thread.

OP is asking a legitimate question, which you know the answer to - the celts and germanians were quite frankly on the same level of the african zulu before the romans came.
you just dont want to face it.

Sounds like you're compensating for something.

I would too, frankly. The difference in development between the 2 groups when they met 1500 years later has got to be an embarrassing pill to swallow.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 438969
12-07-2017 05:24 PM

 



Post: #29
RE: Britain Before the Romans
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 12:33 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (12-07-2017 12:23 PM)
I don't think anyone knows about pre Roman British there are no writings nor are there any standout archeological sites and ruins to learn from. I know a lot of the ten tribes Goths Lomarbs Vandals etc but I want to know if the had any philosophical schools governing etc that can be traced pre roman times. Thanks for all your inputs.

No stand out sites for pre-Roman archaeology in Britain. Lmao

If you were at all interested you would already know about about pre-Roman Britain. I am fascinated to know what country you are from, I would put good money on it not being one of the 22.

My dad is Scottish my mom African, anyway the project is based on Theology my my uni paper, I am trying to work out the order of empires in accordance to Daniel 's Statue, not being controversial and trying to figure out where the British fit in all this and wil they be the final beast Kingdom?since the bible say in the end days the most powerful nations and kings will form the four headed beast Kingdom, also trying to figure out about' until the days of the Gentiles are done. It's not taking a dig, was just looking for a different perspective. But thanks I have found some of the info you posted useful. I was a bit ignorant of a few, so sorry for any offence.
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Pinguu
Registered User
User ID: 438456
12-07-2017 05:29 PM

Posts: 17,343



Post: #30
RE: Britain Before the Romans
We invented the Beaker to drink from....

Beaker Folk liked to drink...without us inventing the Beaker you would have to drink from a shoe....Zulus if they were about were still drinking from puddles and cows tits.

Bell Beaker Culture (Britain) (Chalcolithic Age)
c.2800 - 1800 BC

MapThe Beaker folk (or Beaker culture) arrived in Britain around 2700-2500 BC, intermingling fairly peacefully with the existing Neolithic culture and adopting its henges. The Beaker folk brought new burial practices with them so that Neolithic long barrows or cairns were replaced by smaller barrows or tumuli. They also brought new metalworking techniques with them, in copper and gold, heralding the start of the Chalcolithic Age. They came from a society that stretched across Europe (covering all of Iberia, most of Germany, and northern and southern France excluding the Central Massif), and they introduced a patriarchal society in which the individual warrior-chieftain became the most important and powerful figure, replacing the existing egalitarian society that built Stonehenge. They gained their name, which is sometimes given as Bell Beaker Folk, through their use of a large number of drinking cups called beakers. Burials with these pots alongside the dead have been used by archaeologists to chart the growth and expansion of the Beaker folk.

Probably not an invasion of new people, the Beaker folk most likely represented the influx of a new ruling elite in much the same way as later waves of Celtic arrivals would dominate the country. These people were farmers and archers, wearing stone wrist guards to protect their arms from the sting of the bowstring. They introduced the roundhouse, which echoed in shape both the henges and barrow mounds, made their own, distinctive, pottery, and were eventually responsible for producing the first woven garments in Britain. They also appear to have introduced the first known alcoholic drink, a form of honey-based mead. They were the new show in town, and everyone else wanted to copy them (if they even had a choice), so within a fairly short period everyone was Beaker folk, newcomers and natives alike.

It was this Beaker culture that was disrupted in the twelfth century BC, possibly by the arrival of the first wave Celtic settlers in Prydein during a period of intense disruption that took place as far afield as the Middle East, where the collapse of the Hittite empire was a major act in a century of turmoil. Although many would have stayed put and accepted their new Celtic overlords, some would have migrated westwards to avoid them, or were already in the west. Here they remained safe from Celtic domination for much longer, and when that domination finally came, it may only have been through a warrior elite.

Even today you can actually see in Wales where the Beaker folk and Neolithic people are to some extent separated. In South Wales are Mediterranean (Bell Beaker) types with a Neolithic admixture, and in the mountains of central Wales are the stockier more round-headed Neolithics. Judging from that alone one would posit that Mediterraneans took over and settled the South Wales lowlands, without substantially settling the mountains of central Wales.

(Additional information from The Horse, the Wheel, and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World, David W Anthony, from the tv documentary, Secrets of the Stonehenge Skeletons, with Mike Parker Pearson, first screened in the UK by Channel 4 Television in 2013, and from External Link: Stonehenge.)

c.2600 - 2500 BC
With the influx of the Beaker folk adding fresh impetus to the work, the construction of Phase III of Stonehenge is begun at this time and continues until around 1600 BC. Aligned with the sunset of the winter solstice, the monument undergoes a complicated sequence of settings of large stones. This starts with a series of Bluestones placed in the Q and R Holes (Sub-Phase 3i). These are subsequently dismantled and a circle of sarsens and a horseshoe-shaped arrangement of Trilithons is erected (Sub-Phase 3ii). The Sarsen Circle is comprised of thirty upright sandstone blocks (only seventeen now remain standing). They support sarsen lintels forming a continuous circle around the top, with each sarsen probably being brought to the site from the Marlborough Downs, about thirty kilometres to the north.
FeatureA huge settlement, one of the largest seen in Britain, is used by the people who build Stonehenge. Its remains are discovered by archaeologists in 2006. The site at Durrington Walls seems to be occupied seasonally, being used for ritual feasting and funeral ceremonies. Neolithic people from all over the region are probably drawn here, enjoying massive feasts in the midwinter, where prodigious quantities of food are consumed. The bones are then tossed onto the floors of the houses to be unearthed 4600 years later. Durrington also has its own henge made of wood, which is strikingly similar in layout to Stonehenge but which aligns to the sunrise of the winter solstice.

LOP GUEST WROTE... like u should be burned and then smashed into concrete and swept away with a high speed wire brush into the winds of ignorance that you wallow in.

Wow....im in Love.
(This post was last modified: 12-07-2017 05:38 PM by Pinguu.) Quote this message in a reply
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