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Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
singing wilbury spider
Kraut! und Rüben!
User ID: 1337
02-13-2018 10:51 AM

Posts: 3,728



Post: #16
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
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about the elephants:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_African_elephant
The North African elephant (Loxodonta africana pharaoensis) was the subspecies of the African bush elephant (Loxodonta africana), or possibly a separate elephant species, that existed in North Africa north of the Sahara until becoming extinct in Roman times. These were the famous war elephants used by Carthage in the Punic Wars, their conflict with the Roman Republic. Although the subspecies has been formally described,[1][2] it has not been widely recognized by taxonomists. Other names for this animal include the North African forest elephant, Carthaginian elephant, and Atlas elephant. Originally, its natural range probably extended across North Africa and down to the present Sudanese and Eritrean coasts.

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LoP Guest
lop guest
User ID: 1337
02-13-2018 03:11 PM

 



Post: #17
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
I ended up watching the Boudica one instead.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=araooKV_2DM
There are some definite past life connections for me there.
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LoP Guest
lop guest
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02-13-2018 03:15 PM

 



Post: #18
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
LoP Guest  Wrote: (02-13-2018 03:11 PM)
I ended up watching the Boudica one instead.




There are some definite past life connections for me there.

:thumbup
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LoP Guest
lop guest
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02-13-2018 04:49 PM

 



Post: #19
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
PuddyCat  Wrote: (02-13-2018 04:02 AM)
Hannibal vs. Rome: Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History

link to image: http://nationalinterest.org/files/styles...k=6eeOGGce

One of the most pivotal battles in Western history, the Battle of Cannae, was fought 2,232 years ago to the year. The Battle of Cannae occurred on August 2, 216 BCE in southeast Italy between Carthaginian forces led by Hannibal Barca and Roman forces led by Lucius Aemilius Paullus and Gaius Terentius Varro. Both forces also included various allied soldiers. The battle, which ended in a major Roman defeat, is considered to be of great importance because of its tactical lessons for posterity, as well as the fact that it was the closest the Roman state had come to destruction in its history up to that point.

Of course, the Battle of Cannae did not spell the end of the Roman Republic; it not only survived the disaster, but ended up beating and eventually annexing the Carthaginians. Eventually, the Roman Republic became an empire whose cultural, political and legal legacy to the world is incalculable. But Rome might have never learned the lessons of toughness that made it so great had it not faced the existential crisis brought on by Hannibal’s invasion of Italy.

After the Roman Republic beat Carthage in the First Punic War (264-241 BCE), the Carthaginians looked for ways to strengthen themselves militarily and economically. As a result of the war, the Romans became the dominant naval power in the Mediterranean. One way in which this was achieved was the colonization of Iberia, then a mineral-rich region inhabited by various tribes. This effort was spearheaded by a Carthaginian general, Hamilcar Barca. Eventually, by 218 BCE, Hamilcar’s son Hannibal commanded Carthaginian forces in Iberia while using its resources to build up a significant force. That year, the Second Punic War began when Hannibal attacked the cited of Saguntum in Iberia, which had allied with the Romans despite being in the Carthaginian sphere of influence. Hannibal then took the initiative and invaded the Roman heartland of Italy through the Alps with about 38 thousand infantry, eight thousand cavalry and 37 elephants.

Once in Italy, Hannibal had the upper hand, and many tribes that had been conquered by the Romans either failed to assist the Romans or aided Hannibal. Direct confrontations between Roman and Carthaginian forces led to Roman defeats at Trebia (218) and Lake Trasimene (217), the latter of which is often described as the largest ambush in history. The Romans, by then desperate, appointed a dictator, Fabius Maximus, who adapted a non-confrontational strategy, avoiding open battles and engaging in guerilla warfare. However, as Hannibal marched to southern Italy, where he aimed to persuade many Greek and Italian allies of Rome to switch sides, hotter heads prevailed, and Paullus and Varro were elected Consuls. They raised an army of forty thousand Roman legionaries, forty thousand allied infantry, and 2,500 cavalry to confront Hannibal, who awaited them at Cannae.

From the start, even before the battle began, Hannibal demonstrated the strategic genius for which he is remembered for today. For example, he chose to camp his army in Cannae because it was a food magazine for the Romans, and was located in a region where Rome acquired much of its grain supply. These facts put much pressure on the Roman army. After the Romans arrived, Hannibal sent his cavalry to prevent the Romans from accessing water from the only river in the area, thus provoking a fight on his terms.

http://nationalinterest.org/blog/hanniba...most-18763





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFhuWHMkUQo

This bit of history about Hannibal is fascinating Popcorn

How would things be different today 'IF' Rome was defeated? The documentary paints Romes rise as a direct result of Hannibal.

Thanks for such an interesting and informative post and video!

Cmicsfee
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LoP Guest
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User ID: 1337
02-13-2018 06:56 PM

 



Post: #20
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
PuddyCat  Wrote: (02-13-2018 04:02 AM)
Hannibal vs. Rome: Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History

link to image: http://nationalinterest.org/files/styles...k=6eeOGGce

One of the most pivotal battles in Western history, the Battle of Cannae, was fought 2,232 years ago to the year. The Battle of Cannae occurred on August 2, 216 BCE in southeast Italy between Carthaginian forces led by Hannibal Barca and Roman forces led by Lucius Aemilius Paullus and Gaius Terentius Varro. Both forces also included various allied soldiers. The battle, which ended in a major Roman defeat, is considered to be of great importance because of its tactical lessons for posterity, as well as the fact that it was the closest the Roman state had come to destruction in its history up to that point.

Of course, the Battle of Cannae did not spell the end of the Roman Republic; it not only survived the disaster, but ended up beating and eventually annexing the Carthaginians. Eventually, the Roman Republic became an empire whose cultural, political and legal legacy to the world is incalculable. But Rome might have never learned the lessons of toughness that made it so great had it not faced the existential crisis brought on by Hannibal’s invasion of Italy.

After the Roman Republic beat Carthage in the First Punic War (264-241 BCE), the Carthaginians looked for ways to strengthen themselves militarily and economically. As a result of the war, the Romans became the dominant naval power in the Mediterranean. One way in which this was achieved was the colonization of Iberia, then a mineral-rich region inhabited by various tribes. This effort was spearheaded by a Carthaginian general, Hamilcar Barca. Eventually, by 218 BCE, Hamilcar’s son Hannibal commanded Carthaginian forces in Iberia while using its resources to build up a significant force. That year, the Second Punic War began when Hannibal attacked the cited of Saguntum in Iberia, which had allied with the Romans despite being in the Carthaginian sphere of influence. Hannibal then took the initiative and invaded the Roman heartland of Italy through the Alps with about 38 thousand infantry, eight thousand cavalry and 37 elephants.

Once in Italy, Hannibal had the upper hand, and many tribes that had been conquered by the Romans either failed to assist the Romans or aided Hannibal. Direct confrontations between Roman and Carthaginian forces led to Roman defeats at Trebia (218) and Lake Trasimene (217), the latter of which is often described as the largest ambush in history. The Romans, by then desperate, appointed a dictator, Fabius Maximus, who adapted a non-confrontational strategy, avoiding open battles and engaging in guerilla warfare. However, as Hannibal marched to southern Italy, where he aimed to persuade many Greek and Italian allies of Rome to switch sides, hotter heads prevailed, and Paullus and Varro were elected Consuls. They raised an army of forty thousand Roman legionaries, forty thousand allied infantry, and 2,500 cavalry to confront Hannibal, who awaited them at Cannae.

From the start, even before the battle began, Hannibal demonstrated the strategic genius for which he is remembered for today. For example, he chose to camp his army in Cannae because it was a food magazine for the Romans, and was located in a region where Rome acquired much of its grain supply. These facts put much pressure on the Roman army. After the Romans arrived, Hannibal sent his cavalry to prevent the Romans from accessing water from the only river in the area, thus provoking a fight on his terms.

http://nationalinterest.org/blog/hanniba...most-18763





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFhuWHMkUQo

This bit of history about Hannibal is fascinating Popcorn

How would things be different today 'IF' Rome was defeated? The documentary paints Romes rise as a direct result of Hannibal.

The idea that Phoenicians had not previously colonized the Iberian peninsula is just plain nonsense.
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Lakeofmarch
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02-13-2018 07:33 PM

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Post: #21
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
It was a good thing he lost, though.. surviving images show a supernaturally cruel and unforgiving thug, worse than any caesar, as befits their secretive and violent religion.

[Image: Dc-hannibal-coin.png]

Those upon the kingship of the people
Those with their harvest measured in their mad time and their mad age
Will know their kingship will end in PAIN.
Their hands tied before them,they will be taken to the King,
To the First True Man.
-Chilam Balam-
https://secretsun.blogspot.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umfmmBHXbU0
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02-13-2018 08:40 PM

 



Post: #22
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
Scipio Africanus eventually crushed Hannibal at Zama 202BCE. Even carthage eventually exiled Hannibal and he went to serve Antiochus the Great in the east. He tried his lot as an admiral and was a failure. He later committed suicide as the Romans were closing in on him.

He never had a clue on how to make Rome submit. Back then, the Romans never surrendered. They always fought on till victory.
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loNeNLI
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02-13-2018 08:47 PM

 



Post: #23
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
i ve read
missed the point
why 'the most important' ...?

armies knew 2000 y before that , to go close off wells etc
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02-13-2018 09:00 PM

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Post: #24
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
LoP Guest  Wrote: (02-13-2018 08:40 PM)
Scipio Africanus eventually crushed Hannibal at Zama 202BCE. Even carthage eventually exiled Hannibal and he went to serve Antiochus the Great in the east. He tried his lot as an admiral and was a failure. He later committed suicide as the Romans were closing in on him.

He never had a clue on how to make Rome submit. Back then, the Romans never surrendered. They always fought on till victory.

According to the documentary they, his own government refused to send reinforcements he wanted. So who knows how this would have went if he received the backup he asked for.

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Pic made by CCLSHC
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02-13-2018 09:01 PM

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Post: #25
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
Lakeofmarch  Wrote: (02-13-2018 07:33 PM)
It was a good thing he lost, though.. surviving images show a supernaturally cruel and unforgiving thug, worse than any caesar, as befits their secretive and violent religion.

[Image: Dc-hannibal-coin.png]

That is a coin Greenie

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[Image: cert.jpg]
Pic made by CCLSHC
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02-13-2018 09:04 PM

 



Post: #26
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
loNeNLI  Wrote: (02-13-2018 08:47 PM)
i ve read
missed the point
why 'the most important' ...?

armies knew 2000 y before that , to go close off wells etc

Because military leaders from that point forward tried to duplicate the encirclement tactic used by Hannibal at Cannae.

It was the classic example of how to beat a greater force than that of your own on the battlefield.
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loNeNLI
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02-13-2018 09:09 PM

 



Post: #27
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
LoP Guest  Wrote: (02-13-2018 09:04 PM)
loNeNLI  Wrote: (02-13-2018 08:47 PM)
i ve read
missed the point
why 'the most important' ...?

armies knew 2000 y before that , to go close off wells etc

Because military leaders from that point forward tried to duplicate the encirclement tactic used by Hannibal at Cannae.

It was the classic example of how to beat a greater force than that of your own on the battlefield.

i love ancient history . it aint about that .

trust me - they were as smart , 2000 y before this .

OP is nice
but the slant the site gave to this , is a bit searched
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02-13-2018 09:16 PM

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Post: #28
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
loNeNLI  Wrote: (02-13-2018 09:09 PM)
LoP Guest  Wrote: (02-13-2018 09:04 PM)
Because military leaders from that point forward tried to duplicate the encirclement tactic used by Hannibal at Cannae.

It was the classic example of how to beat a greater force than that of your own on the battlefield.

i love ancient history . it aint about that .

trust me - they were as smart , 2000 y before this .

OP is nice
but the slant the site gave to this , is a bit searched

Hugs

I love history also and can only hope the material added is as historically close as possible.

[Image: KlW1xw5.gif]

[Image: cert.jpg]
Pic made by CCLSHC
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LoP Guest
lop guest
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02-13-2018 09:20 PM

 



Post: #29
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
Consider this: Everything happening in the world until your conception, led to your birth. Had anything else happened, you might not have been born.
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loNeNLI
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02-13-2018 09:26 PM

 



Post: #30
RE: Hannibal vs Rome:Why the Battle of Cannae Is One of the Most Important in History
PuddyCat  Wrote: (02-13-2018 09:16 PM)
loNeNLI  Wrote: (02-13-2018 09:09 PM)
i love ancient history . it aint about that .

trust me - they were as smart , 2000 y before this .

OP is nice
but the slant the site gave to this , is a bit searched

Hugs

I love history also and can only hope the material added is as historically close as possible.

it is

for you - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBuwC4VJi50
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